Apostrophe to Zion: New Meaning for a Dead Sea Scroll?

psalmscroll

I’m still enjoying Slacktacular August with a reduced blogging schedule, but I thought this was a fascinating little slice of the philology world that shows how scholars grapple with ancient languages and shifting meanings. In this case, it’s the Hebrew root “taph-bet-ayin,” which has various modern meanings: “to demand,” “to investigate,” “to prosecute.” The “Apostrophe [Read More...]

The Temple Mount: A Virtual Tour

3dtemple

Courtesy of the Israeli Minister of Construction and Housing and a group called The Heart of the Nation comes this virtual tour of the Temple Mount, complete with 360-degree views of various locations. It’s was released to coincide with Tisha B’av, which commemorates the destruction of the First and Second Temples. A couple of caveats: [Read More...]

Are These Beams From the First Temple?

photo credit: Matti Friedman/Times of Israel

Reused for millennia, discarded, forgotten, left in a padlocked storage space: these rough chunks of wood hewn from cedar, cypress, and oak up to 3000 years ago may once have been part of the First Temple. Building materials routinely were recycled throughout ancient times, but these are important because they were removed from the Al-Aqsa [Read More...]

Conviction Upheld in Dead Sea Scrolls Identity Theft

golb

In yesterday’s news about the final stop for the Dead Sea Scrolls exhibit, I mentioned some of the controversy surrounding scroll scholarship. One of the more bizarre sideshows in the world of the DSS is The Sorry Saga of the Golbs. Raphael Golb is the son of scroll scholar Norman Golb, a man who has [Read More...]

Dead Sea Scrolls Heading to Boston Next

exhibits_dead-sea-scrolls_family-pointing-scales-weights

I wrote about the Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Ancient Times exhibit when it visited Philadelphia last year. The scrolls still fascinate because they’re a kind of missing link between the closing of the Old Testament and the opening of the New, giving us a picture of some elements of Judaism as it [Read More...]

Wine in the Gospel of John

Gerard David, "The Marriage at Cana"

The discussion of wine in the Old Testament provides the background for the Wedding at Cana in John 2, which is rich in OT imagery made new in Christ. The Evangelist tells us that Jesus has come to a wedding: a time of joy and celebration where wine would play a crucial role. But the [Read More...]

Wine in the Old Testament

Egyptian wine press

Bread was the ordinary food of the people, but wine was for celebration. It was a symbol of joy. It was considered so important in the ritual life of the Jews that people had the responsibility to provide wine for the poor during the feasts if the poor could not provide it for themselves. The [Read More...]

Bread & Wine | Life & Abundance

"Bread" in the Old Testament

The moment when the Lord comes down and transforms bread and wine to become his Body and Blood cannot fail to stun, to the very core of their being, those who participate in the Eucharist by faith and prayer. When this happens, we cannot do other than fall to our knees and greet him. The [Read More...]


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