“Jesus’s Wife” Scholar Admits: Where There Are Flames, There May Be Fire

jw

Partially conceding the bloody obvious, Harvard professor Karen L. King said the following to the New York Times: This is substantive, it’s worth taking seriously, and it may point in the direction of forgery. This is one option that should receive serious consideration, but I don’t think it’s a done deal. The “this” she’s talking [Read More...]

Another Nail in the Coffin of the “Jesus’s Wife” Hoax

Gospel of John fragment from same group as the Gospel of Jesus's Wife.

Evidence indicating that Karen King’s so-called “Gospel of Jesus’s Wife” (GJW) is a modern forgery just keeps piling up. Most recently, we learned that the man listed as the source for the document (prior to the anonymous donor/forger) almost certainly never owned it. This came on top of a mountain of other evidence suggesting modern [Read More...]

“Jesus’s Wife” Hoax: The Plot Thickens

smith

Kudos to LiveScience for doing an actual investigation into the provenance claims of the so-called “Gospel of Jesus’s Wife.” The results are fascinating. Karen King initially put the document forward as a copy of a 2nd century lost “gospel” before retreating, in the face of inconclusive testing, to the possibility of it being an 8th [Read More...]

A New Poem By Sappho Discovered UPDATED

Saphhos

This is pretty big news: there’s a major discovery of previously unknown poems by the great Greek poet Sappho. Few lines of her work have survived (some of them in our old friend the Oxyrhynchus dump), so each find is important. This new verses are on a scrap of papyrus in the hands of a [Read More...]

The Oxyrhynchus Project: Desktop Papyrology

ancientlives

el-Bahnasa is a sand-blasted village about 100 miles south of Cairo. Once known as Oxyrhynchus (“City of the Sharp-Nose Fish”), it prospered under the Greeks, and became largely Christian under the Romans and Byzantines. It had a gradual decline until about the 7th century, when Arab invasions finished it off. Its structures–including a number of churches and monasteries–were [Read More...]


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