Dear Patheos

patheos ads

Dear Patheos:

I hope you guys are doing well. I’ve been meaning to drop you a line and I’ve finally gotten around to it.

The last three years have gone by so quickly! Image journal’s blog “Good Letters” has flourished here, gaining many more readers than would ever have been possible if we’d remained sequestered on our own website.

We’ve been amazed at your growth and all the many fascinating conversations about religions that take place here. The rise of Patheos has certainly been one of the more remarkable stories among religious websites on the Internet.

I must say that you’ve treated us well. You regularly choose posts from “Good Letters” to be featured on your home page. That means a lot to us, precisely because our posts reflect Image’s identity as a literary quarterly seeking to bring the indirect, intuitive language of art to bear on the big religious questions. [Read more...]

The Thing Itself: Art and Poverty, Part 2

Continued from yesterday.

 

picasso1How should we treat the poor?

Among those who work on behalf of them, it has become a truism that our first obligation toward our less fortunate brothers and sisters is to first recognize and celebrate their humanity. What is less often recognized is the vital role that art can play in such a process. Roberta Ahmanson in the interview she gave recently for Image spoke about how she, as a patron of the arts, has worked to serve homeless families through a nonprofit called Village of Hope:

I think people might say that the Village of Hope doesn’t need stained-glass windows; they need food, job training, tutoring, beds for the babies. But Jim [the founder] intuitively understood that the places you bring people to speak to them about their own value. When you…put them in a box like a prison cell, you have just said, “We think you are a prisoner.” [Read more...]

The Thing Itself: Art and Poverty, Part 1

The following is adapted from a presentation given at the Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology in Berkeley in January 2015 during a convocation on the topic “Blessed Are You Poor: What Does It Mean to Be a Poor Church for the Poor?”

 

pop__frugal_mealI am profoundly grateful that the witness of Pope Francis has spurred so many of us to rethink our relationship to the poor and marginalized. There are a dozen directions to take this topic, depending on how we define poverty. We have spoken of it as an evil—a condition to be ameliorated whenever possible—and we have spoken of it as a virtue—a habit that embraces simplicity, freedom, and sacrifice.

It is, of course, both.

[Read more...]

The Contemporary Literature & Faith Debate: Weblinks

As many of our readers know, there has been a lively debate over the past year concerning the condition of contemporary literature as it engages religious faith.

Because that debate has been conducted over many different venues, we’ve received requests for a list of weblinks that would enable readers to follow the conversation.

That’s what we’ve done below. Feel free to add further thoughts about this conversation in the comments section.

Paul Elie, “Has Fiction Lost Its Faith?”

D.G. Myers, “The Novel of Belief

Gregory Wolfe, “Whispers of Faith in a Postmodern World

Dana Gioia, “The Catholic Writer Today

Gregory Wolfe, “Cultural Anorexia: Doubting the Decline of Faith in Fiction

Gregory Wolfe, “The Catholic Writer, Then and Now” (expanded version of “Cultural Anorexia”)

Paul Elie, Dappled Things interview (include comments on Wolfe’s “Whispers of Faith” article)

[Read more...]

The Problem with Waiting, Part 1

books, candleI don’t have much time. I’m sitting in a coffee shop less than a mile from my house and place of employment feverishly re-reading Dana Gioia’s recent First Things essay “The Catholic Writer Today” and pounding out these words. But in an hour I will need to pack up my laptop and books and make the walk back—my morning course “The Elements of Fiction” starts at 9:50 am.

There are two ways of making the walk, one practical the other prosaic. The practical one is the most direct and takes me along the shoulder of a busy two-lane county road whose berm is piled with old snow. The prosaic takes me into the woods behind the elementary school adjacent to this coffee shop. There I can pick up a well-blazed trail lined with towering pines that drifts away from the road and eventually leads to the cul-de-sac at the end of the subdivision where I live. [Read more...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X