Premillenial dispensationalism and superheroes

I have this idea for a superhero novel kicking around in my head… maybe I’ll do it for this year’s NaNoWriMo, who knows. Anyway, because I’m annoyed by the fact that it’s impossible to give an explanation of superpowers that makes any sense, part of the premise is that nobody knows why people suddenly started getting superpowers in 1999.

Of course, just because nobody knows who people are getting superpowers doesn’t stop people from claiming to know. People end up trying to explain things in terms of every kind of late-90s looniness imaginable. So, for example, there would be people going in to hypnotherapists to help them “remember” being given their powers while being abducted by aliens (not all of these people would actually have powers).

The one thing I can’t figure out: what do the premillennial dispensationalists think of all this? Obviously the powers are demonic and mark the beginning of the ends times, sure, but how exactly do they go about twisting Bible passages to claim the Bible predicted superheroes?

Given the convoluted interpretations premillennial dispensationalists have come up with in real life, I’m sure they can do it, but I’m not sure how. My brain isn’t up to quite the necessary level of insane troll logic. Can anyone, particularly ex-premillennial dispensationalists, help me out here?

(Obviously, the last three digits of 1999 are 666 upside down, and 666 x 3 = 1998, which could be interpreted as significant if you assume we were one year off in calculating Jesus’ birth or people really started getting powers in 1998 but we didn’t notice for a year. Other than that, I got nothing.)

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Kris Komarnitsky's Doubting Jesus' Resurrection

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