Ad hominem links

If I do end up becoming a philosophy professor, I think one of my big goals in intro classes will be trying to teach students to identify common fallacies… and tell when a particular fallacy isn’t being committed. To that end, I think the following links would make a pretty good reading list on the topic of ad [Read More...]

Animal harm reduction

Andrew Sullivan publishes an e-mail from ex-vegan Rhys Southan. Among other things, Southan explains: [Read more...]

Learned a new term today: incestuous amplification

Paul Krugman taught me a new term today: [Read more...]

From the archives: Seduced by sophistication (follow up to “Philosophy is dysfunctional”)

While writing another post, I just realized that while I had reposted my post “Philosophy is dysfunctional,” I’d never reposted this, the follow-up. Like the first post, it was originally published in July 2011. [Read more...]

The problem with asking science to be religion-friendly

Previously: The scientific study of prayer [Read more...]

Following the argument where it leads ≠ believing everything you hear (even when accompanied by an argument)

The very last section of my first book (which I swear I will try to make available as an ebook very soon) tells readers to basically go out and research the issue for themselves and reach their own conclusions. Part of me worried about that part of the book, worries that it comes off as [Read More...]

Hirsch numbers for… err… various people

This post was originally going to be titled “Hirsch numbers for theologians,” but I got a little carried away checking Hirsch numbers for people in different fields and now it’s just “Hirsch numbers for various people.” The original intent, though, was to check something that’s been bugging me about chapter two of the book: are the theologians [Read More...]

Getting up to speed on my science (with reading recommendations!)

Update 12/2/2012: I’ve decided I’m going to be periodically updating this post. All updates (except this one) will be placed at the bottom of the post. [Read more...]

Ed Feser, physics, and the Dunning-Kruger effect

Leah Libresco keeps recommending Ed Feser’s books, though I can’t fathom why. But it gave me the idea to try to write something about his books. So I opened my ebook copy of Feser’s Aquinas… and was quickly reminded that all of Feser’s “arguments” always strike me as blatant non-sequiturs, just like the original versions in Aquinas’ writings. There is, [Read More...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X