Perhaps violence isn’t so black and white after all…

To kill one man is to be guilty of a capital crime, to kill ten men is to increase the guilt ten-fold, to kill a hundred men is to increase it a hundred-fold. This the rulers of the earth all recognize, and yet when it comes to the greatest crime–waging war on another state–they praise [Read More...]

Idiots, Maniacs and Me

I spend a lot of time arguing with people on Facebook. Perhaps too much time. But as I’m writing a script or doing some other sort of creative work, I find it helpful to jump back and forth between whatever I’m writing and whatever I’m arguing about. I used to play chess and Scrabble online [Read More...]

What is the best foundation for the existence of objective moral values–theism or atheism?

Either I’m getting old or something is happening at precisely 4:48 a.m. each morning to wake me up. Whatever the case, one of the things I do to while away the early morning hours/help myself fall back asleep is listen to podcasts on all sorts of topics. This weekend it was Sam Harris debating William [Read More...]

Moral outrage and other ways to “win” arguments

If you’d like to read a fascinating critique of penal substitutionary atonement theory, I heartily recommend you read through Michael Hardin’s comments on this recent post by Scot McKnight. However, if you’d like to observe some commonly employed tactics used to avoid substantive critique of one’s position, I invite you to read Scot’s post, itself. [Read More...]

A momentary lapse of reason?

I’ve been following with great interest Sam Harris’s extended exchanges with his critics. First it was Daniel Dennet, who wrote a lengthy and scathing critique of Harris’s book Free Will, calling it a “veritable museum of mistakes.” I am grateful to Harris for saying, so boldly and clearly, what less outgoing scientists are┬áthinking but keeping [Read More...]

The best of all possible stories — can it be true?

That’s the title of the paper I’ll be delivering at Trinity Western University’s Hell and Damnation public philosophy lecture event on February 13. Also presenting will be TWU philosophy professor Myron Penner, whose paper is called “How to Be a Universalist.” The event kicks off at 7pm and will wrap around 9. Q&A to follow [Read More...]

Can we be scientific about theology?

I say, “Yes!” But if we are going to be scientific about theology, it seems to me we need to proceed like scientists, with as few assumptions about the data under observation as possible, i.e. that the Spirit is somehow guiding us. Rather than proceed from that assumption, I would rather wait and see if [Read More...]

The NSA: From “No Such Agency” to “New Snowden Age”

In early 2001, I was doing research for a novel about a radio operator on a Trident nuclear submarine who receives a mysterious signal from what appears to be an extra-terrestrial source and subsequently finds himself at the center of an international and [possibly] interplanetary crisis. As part of my research, I spent time studying [Read More...]

A few thoughts on avoiding extremes

Just because something isn’t what you expected doesn’t mean it isn’t good. Just becomes something can’t do everything doesn’t mean it can’t do some things well. For something to be revealed, other things must be concealed. Therefore, the key question behind every “A-ha moment” should be, “What am I missing?” Don’t just accept an idea [Read More...]

This would be comical if it weren’t so ludicrous

Apparently, some troops stationed at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp–where prisoners have been routinely held without trial, abused and tortured since 2002–are upset about some nativity scenes displayed in two mess halls, which they say unfairly privilege Christianity over other religions. By placing these displays in prominent common areas, the impression is that one faith [Read More...]


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