Luke 12: Where Your Treasure Is, There Is Your Heart

One of the greatest lines in the Gospels from my perspective is found in Luke 12:34. Jesus says, “For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.”

The context is one in which Jesus teaches his disciples that God supplies their needs. As a result, they do not need to worry, but rather live a life of generosity that gives to those in need.

He then provides some examples:

A raven is given the food it needs to live by God, apart from work of its own.

The wild flowers of the field display exquisite beauty, apart from any effort on their own.

God cares for us much more than birds or flowers. As such, He challenges us not to worry, but to live the life He has called us to pursue, here and for eternity.

Where is your treasure? The next sale, the next paycheck, the next vacation, the next party, the next relationship? If so, that is where your heart will be focused. But if your treasure is Christ, he will be the focus of your heart.

To become more like Christ, we must focus more on Christ.

“Where your treasure is, there is your heart.”

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Dillon Burroughs has written, co-written, or edited over 60 books, including the upcoming devotional work Thirst No More (October 2011). He served as an associate editor for The Apologetics Study Bible for Students and is a graduate of Dallas Theological Seminary. Find out more at readdB.com.

Luke 10: Who Is My Neighbor?

Luke 10 opens the dialogue that redefines our typical definition of neighbor. We think of a neighbor as the person next door, but Jesus had something else (and something better) in mind.

The question: “Who is my neighbor?”

The response: “The one who had mercy on him [the one in need].”

In the story used to answer the question, known as the account of the Good Samaritan, many interesting observations can be made.

The person…

…was in need.

…could not help themselves.

…was of a different ethnicity.

…was of a different religion.

…had nothing to offer in return.

…required time, energy, and financial commitments.

…and required a risk.

If that is the requirement of a good neighbor, we all have room to grow. Only when we can respond to people in similar situations, whether the difference is religion, race, or another risk, are we truly answering Christ’s call to “Go and do likewise.”

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Dillon Burroughs has written, co-written, or edited over 60 books, including the upcoming devotional work Thirst No More (October 2011). He served as an associate editor for The Apologetics Study Bible for Students and is a graduate of Dallas Theological Seminary. Find out more at readdB.com.

Luke 9: How Jesus Made Headlines

Our consumer culture envies the pursuit of publicity for its organization’s latest product or service. Fans camp out for the latest iPad or film release. Politicians even pay attention to the ever-changing trends in popular culture, knowing their message is impacted by what happens elsewhere.

But how did Jesus make headlines?

It’s an interesting question. In some ways, he didn’t. Jesus didn’t publish bestselling novels, direct a film, or start the First-Century equivalent of Microsoft or Facebook.

On the flip side, his activities garnered the attention of the king, the religious leaders, and eventually led to a death sentence.

One intriguing aspect in Luke 9 is revealed in the response of Herod. Luke notes:

7 Now Herod the tetrarch heard about all that was going on. And he was perplexed because some were saying that John had been raised from the dead, 8 others that Elijah had appeared, and still others that one of the prophets of long ago had come back to life. 9 But Herod said, “I beheaded John. Who, then, is this I hear such things about?” And he tried to see him.

Herod “heard” things. A new teacher with healing powers had arrived. He spoke about the kingdom of God and scared away demons. This was even bigger than a camel-skin wearing preacher on the riverside. Herod, as a result, tried to see him.

What are you doing to follow Jesus that would attract the attention of others? I’m not talking about a stadium event or suing your state over some religious liberty issue. What are you doing to attract the attention of those around you by the faith you live?

Jesus loved people, cared for the outsider, spoke against the abuses of religious leaders in his society, offered hope, healing, and eternal life. The more we do what he did, the more we’ll receive the response he did.

Hopefully that won’t include the death sentence part, but it will draw attention to Jesus, the one who died for us so we could have new life. This new life, lived out in the ordinary activities of each day, continues today to make headlines, changes the world, and changes eternity.

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Dillon Burroughs has written, co-written, or edited over 60 books, including the upcoming devotional work Thirst No More (October 2011). He served as an associate editor for The Apologetics Study Bible for Students and is a graduate of Dallas Theological Seminary. Find out more at DillonBurroughs.org.


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