Millennials and Education

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A Millennial Branding survey of more than 1,300 college students found that they are open to new ways of learning. Could the high cost of college be driving this change? Or could it be the ubiquity of free learning tools available online?

Regardless of the reason, it’s obvious that the higher education environment is changing….

The answer remains to be seen, but college students’ attitudes could push that change more quickly than we expected. Below are a few key statistics from The Future of Education.

Of college students surveyed:

84% use a computer in the classroom
78% believe that it’s easier to learn in a traditional classroom than online
57% believe internships are most important when developing their business skills
53% believe that online colleges are reputable
50% say they don’t need a physical classroom
43% say that online education will provide them with courses of the same or higher quality than traditional colleges
39% view the future of education as being more virtual
19% said that they’ll be using social media to engage in the classroom
12% believe college courses are most important when developing their business skills

 

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  • http://davidbrush.com mrdcbrush

    One of the trends, and not just for millenials, is that many are looking for inter-disciplinary learning experiences. In the current job marketplace it makes sense to have cross-disciplinary skills both from a flexibility standpoint, but from a personalized learning standpoint. Examples would be someone who combine computer science and music, statistics and sociology, or in my case missiology/theology/data science. It is the academic rejection of modernist specialist categories.

    The challenge is that universities aren’t built to provide ala-carte degrees and accrediting groups aren’t equipped for the variance in degree structure to validate outcomes.

  • Boyd

    43% say that online education will provide them with courses of the same or higher quality than traditional colleges
    coupled with
    78% believe it is easier to learn in a traditional classroom
    and
    50% say they don’t need a physical classroom
    Interesting.

  • revdrdre

    this is interesting as just now the NY Times had this piece:http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/19/opinion/the-trouble-with-online-college.html?hp&_r=2&