What Do You Think? Tell us.

It’s not new but it’s not talked about. I’m talking about the choice of so many to exercise their rights of free speech by calling out someone on social media — Facebook, Twitter, blogs — who said something they didn’t like, did something they didn’t like, or created a situation they didn’t like. What was said or done in private is made public.

The person going public perceives himself or herself of naming an injustice, setting the record straight, calling someone out, whatever. At times the self-righteousness of the person going public becomes insufferable.

If someone writes something on a website or writes a book or preaches a sermon in public … then a public response is not incommensurate.

But if someone has said something, done something, etc. in a more private realm — let’s say where you work or where you serve — and you call them out in public on social media in order to create an outrage … most of the time this is done publicly in order to create a sense of anger and to put pressure on the person through crowdpounding accusations in social media.

Is this the Christian way?

Do you realize what happens to your employment opportunities down the road? (A friend wrote me a few weeks back to say they wouldn’t hire this person because that person had a habit of taking what was private into the public realm and crowdpounding for justice.)

What is your wisdom?

About Scot McKnight

Scot McKnight is a recognized authority on the New Testament, early Christianity, and the historical Jesus. McKnight, author of more than fifty books, is the Professor of New Testament at Northern Seminary in Lombard, IL.