Jimmy Carter, Man of the People

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Jimmy Carter is on my plane to DC from ATL and just shook every hand of every passenger.

He’s smiling the whole time he greets each person and shake each hand—and somehow that’s not hard to imagine at all.

If you are whirling with positive jealousy, you can actually meet President Carter on any given Sunday during his weekly Sunday School class in Plains, Georgia at the Marantha Church. He has been known to take a photo with anyone who attends the class and would like stay after to take one with him. If former First Lady Rosaylynn Carter is there, she will probably join him. I know this because I went, and they did, and I have a photo to prove it. I was there the same day President Carter first announced, during the class, that he was cancer-free after being diagnosed six months earlier. The news initiated a joyful celebration around the globe. As man of great faith, Jimmy Carter has spent his life giving and walking the talk, and you can be sure, he is a veracious powerhouse and he does not hesitate to call out/censure religious hypocrisy when he sees it.

At 91, the 39th American president, also a Nobel Peace Prize laureate continues, through action and deed, to advocate for human rights, democracy and the elimination of disease around the world, via the The Carter Center (co-founded with wife, Rosalynn Carter). Together, they do much good, including physically building homes with Habitat for Humanity, one week every year—since the 1994. The couple has been married for close to seven decades and he former president refers to the former first lady as his “greatest influence” and says, “Marrying Rosalynn was the best thing I ever did.”

For a lifetime of giving, thank you, President Jimmy Carter. You are  what a REAL American president and leader looks like—and one of our most beloved national treasures. 

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