Do you know who said this?

Here’s another one on atonement: “The logic of punishment was a logic of equivalence (the wages of sin is death); the logic of grace is a logic of surplus and excess.” [Read more...]

Do you know who said this?

Atonement is “the radical newness of the practice of the gospel, as over against the tolerated violence of all other human practices.” Jesus’ death is efficacious, not because it satisfies God… but “because it is the inauguration of the ‘political’ practice of forgiveness … The practice is itself continuing atonement.” Answer: Do you think atonement [Read More...]

Atonement and Postmodernity

An excellent brief on how postmodernity intersects with how we understand atonement can be found in Michael Alsford’s essay, “The Atonement and the Post-Modern Deconstruction of the Self,” in J. Goldingay, Atonement Today (pp. 203-221). Essentially, Alsford contends that postmodernity forces the question of the dethronement of the self which modernity enthroned. [Read more...]

Anti-Semitism and Atonement

I’ve not read it put any better than this when it comes to how Jews respond to the cross and how Christians depict it: “There is a glaring contradiction between a theological tradition [of anti-Semitism] which sets the cross against Israel and uses it to justify setting the Christian community against Israel when the event [Read More...]

Who tells the best atonement story?

This is from Embracing Grace in an earlier version. I jumped into the atonement theory conversation yesterday, and thought I’d put this on the blog today: which theory of the atonement do you believe? I have posted a new poll where you can choose which one [not all] you prefer. [Read more...]

Christ Plays: Atonement and Moralism

The second section of Peterson’s Christ Plays in Ten Thousand Places deals with Christ playing in history (the first was on creation). And in this section he explores the significance of the atonement, Jesus’ death as an act in history, over against moralism (133-147). Peterson is not easy to summarize. Why? Because poetry cannot be [Read More...]

Feminism and Atonement

I will lay it down as a premise for theological thinking about the atonement that one’s theory of sin shapes (even to the point of determining) one’s theory of the atonement. I will also agree with many scholars who point out that males have shaped the discussion of the atonement. [Read more...]

Jesus and His Death arrives

I got my first copy of Jesus and His Death today from Baylor University Press. I thank its fine editorial folk, Carey Newman and Diane Smith, for their exceptional work. It is hard for me to compare editorial staffs, but there can’t be any that are more precise than Baylor’s. I dedicated Jesus and His [Read More...]

Jesus and His Death: First Review

Rick Brannon, a bibliophile, has blogged the first brief review of Jesus and His Death. I posted it at my Jesus and His Death blog, and point you there. [Read more...]

Postmodernity and the Atonement 2

In yesterday’s post I asked the question how we can “prove” that Jesus died for our sins. Many of your responses were challenging and were, so I think, getting to the issue itself. I’d like to wend my way through to what I will call an “answer.” First, I begin with Lyotard’s observation that postmodernity [Read More...]


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