Thirty Three Things #1

1. Newbie Time Travelers Always Kill Hitler on Their First Trip

11/15/2104
At 14:52:28, FreedomFighter69 wrote:
Reporting my first temporal excursion since joining IATT: have just returned from 1936 Berlin, having taken the place of one of Leni Riefenstahl’s cameramen and assassinated Adolf Hitler during the opening of the Olympic Games. Let a free world rejoice!

At 14:57:44, SilverFox316 wrote:
Back from 1936 Berlin; incapacitated FreedomFighter69 before he could pull his little stunt. Freedomfighter69, as you are a new member, please read IATT Bulletin 1147 regarding the killing of Hitler before your next excursion. Failure to do so may result in your expulsion per Bylaw 223.

At 18:06:59, BigChill wrote:
Take it easy on the kid, SilverFox316; everybody kills Hitler on their first trip. I did. It always gets fixed within a few minutes, what’s the harm?

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2. How To Steal The Space Shuttle: A Step-By-Step Guide

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3. Image of God at the Kitchen Table

Every child has a vocation. That’s easy to forget in the chaotic swirl of life: chores, soccer games, birthday parties, and so on. Parents have a lot to keep track of. But in the midst of the chaos, we have to remember that our children have a great purpose: image of God. God created them to be part of his people, called to manifest his glory on earth. It doesn’t matter if they’re two, twelve, or twenty, they’re made in God’s image. His little idols.

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4. At Least 5 Things Scripture Teaches Us About Governments

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5. Facebook’s Population Is Now as Big as the Entire World’s Was in 1804

One billion people. That’s how many active monthly users Facebook has accrued in the eight years of its existence, the company announced today.

It took the population of modern humans about 200,000 years to reach that number, a milestone that was hit, demographers believe, just over two centuries ago in 1804 (bearing in mind that population tabs, then and now, are not exactly precise). Since then, human population has just exploded, enabled and protected by advances in medicine, agriculture, and hygiene. In the past year, it is estimated that the human headcount hit 7 billion.

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6. 5 Great Christian Authors (Who Aren’t C.S. Lewis)

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7. Most Citizens of the Star Wars Galaxy are Probably Totally Illiterate

Not once in any Star Wars movie does someone pick up a book or newspaper, magazine, literary journal, or chapbook handmade by an aspiring Jawa poet. If something is read by someone in Star Wars, it’s almost certainly off of a screen (and even then, maybe being translated by a droid), and it’s definitely not for entertainment purposes. As early as the 1990s-era expanded Star Wars books and comic books, we’re introduced to ancient Jedi “texts” called holocrons, which are basically talking holographic video recordings. Just how long has the Star Wars universe been reliant on fancy technology to transfer information as opposed to the written word? Is it possible that a good number of people in Star Wars are completely illiterate?

(Via: Noah Millman)

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8. 10 Words You Literally Didn’t Know You Were Getting Wrong

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9. Why do humans walk in circles?

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10. Cell Phones as Meeting Points in a Featureless Landscape

Might cell phones have become so ubiquitous at least in part because they help us to orient ourselves to spaces that, in their endless repetition of national and international chain retailers, transform America into Generica and leave us too few unique identifiers of where we are in the universe? In Generica, cell phones orient us primarily not to place but to one another — which, perhaps, and to be fair, has its benefits.

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11. How to survive a plane crash

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12. Animal Video of the Week (Warning: Nature being red in tooth and claw)

(Via: 22 Words)

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13. Irony as a measure of a eliteness:

Irony is that special privilege of wealthy nations — Aristophanes, possibly the world’s first satirist, wrote his plays as Athens was becoming the dominant power in the region; Cervantes wrote at the height of Spain’s naval wealth; and Alexander Pope was born the year that England defeated the Spanish Armada. First, one scrambles for wealth; then one luxuriates in mocking the effeteness that comes with it.

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14. Kierkegaard on the Bible

The matter is quite simple. The Bible is very easy to understand. But we Christians are a bunch of scheming swindlers. We pretend to be unable to understand it because we know very well that the minute we understand we are obliged to act accordingly. Take any words in the New Testament and forget everything except pledging yourself to act accordingly. My God, you will say, if I do that my whole life will be ruined. How would I ever get on in the world? Herein lies the real place of Christian scholarship. Christian scholarship is the Church’s prodigious invention to defend itself against the Bible, to ensure that we can continue to be good Christians without the Bible coming too close. Oh, priceless scholarship, what would we do without you? Dreadful it is to fall into the hands of the living God. Yes, it is even dreadful to be alone with the New Testament.

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15. Faith is Thinking

Faith according to our Lord’s teaching in [Matthew 6:30], is primarily thinking; and the whole trouble with a man of little faith is that he does not think. He allows circumstances to bludgeon him… . We must spend more time in studying our Lord’s lessons in observation and deduction. The Bible is full of logic, and we must never think of faith as something purely mystical. We do not just sit down in an armchair and expect marvelous things to happen to us. That is not Christian faith. Christian faith is essentially thinking. Look at the birds, think about them, draw your deductions. Look at the grass, look at the lilies of the field, consider them… . Faith, if you like, can be defined like this: It is a man insisting upon thinking when everything seems determined to bludgeon and knock him down in an intellectual sense. The trouble with the person of little faith is that, instead of controlling his own thought, his thought is being controlled by something else, and, as we put it, he goes round and round in circles. That is the essence of worry… . That is not thought; that is the absence of thought, a failure to think.

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16. 25 Favorite Short Stories

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17. Why Liberal Arts Majors Wouldn’t Want to Live on a Space Colony

Think about what life in a space colony would be like: a hermetically sealed, climate-controlled little nothing of a place. Refrigerated air, synthetic materials, and no exit. It would be like living in an airport. An airport in Antarctica. Forever. When I hear someone talking about space colonies, I think, that’s a person who has never studied the humanities. That’s a person who has never stopped to think about what it feels like to go through an average day—what life is about, what makes it worth living, what makes it endurable. A person blessed with a technological imagination and the absence of any other kind.

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18. How to read a lot of books in a short time

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19. Tallis’s Daily Hallucinating Delusional Syndrome

If I told you that I had a neurological disease which meant that for eight or more hours a day I lost control of my faculties, bade farewell to the outside world, and was subject to complex hallucinations and delusions – such as being chased by a grizzly bear at Stockport Railway Station – you would think I was in a pretty bad way. If I also claimed that the condition was infectious, you would wish me luck in coping with such a terrible disease, and bid me a hasty farewell.

Of course, sleep is not a disease at all, but the condition of daily (nightly) life for the vast majority of us. The fact that we accept without surprise the need for a prolonged black-out as part of our daily life highlights our tendency to take for granted anything about our condition that is universal. We don’t see how strange sleep is because (nearly) everyone sleeps. Indeed, the situation of those who do not suffer from Tallis’s Daily Hallucinating Delusional Syndrome is awful. They have something that truly deserves our sympathy: chronic insomnia.

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20. The ten slowest sports cars of all time

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21. How Church Discipline Can Be Like Doctor Shopping

Law enforcement officials use the term “doctor shopping” to refer to the way those addicted to prescription pain medications seek to avert accountability. If you go to your doctor to ask for Vicodin, and your physician refuses to prescribe it, you are doctor shopping if you then seek out multiple doctors until you find the one who will prescribe the Vicodin. Sometimes an addict will have multiple doctors going at once, all prescribing different medicines, often those that are dangerous to mix. I’ve noticed the same thing going on when it comes to church accountability.

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22. HistoricalLOL of the Week

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23. Black American sign language and American sign language are different languages:

Some differences result from a familiar history of privation in black education. Schools for black deaf children — the first of them opened some 50 years after the Hartford school was founded, and most resisted integration until well after the Brown v. Board of Education decision of 1954— tended to have fewer resources. Students were encouraged to focus on vocational careers — repairing shoes or working in laundries — rather than pursuing academic subjects, Lucas says, and some teachers had poor signing skills.

But a late-19th-century development in the theory of how to teach deaf children led, ironically, to black students’ having a more consistent education in signing. The so-called oralism movement, based on the now controversial notion that spoken language is inherently superior to sign language, placed emphasis on teaching deaf children how to lip-read and speak.

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24. Statistic of the Week: More Americans now commit suicide than die in car crashes, making suicide the leading cause of injury deaths, according to a new study.

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25. Aircraft Carriers in Space

Foreign Policy: Let’s reverse the question. Has sci-fi affected the way that our navies conduct warfare?

Chris Weuve: This is a question that I occasionally think about. Many people point to the development of the shipboard Combat Information Center in World War II as being inspired by E.E. Doc Smith’s Lensman novels from the 1940s. Smith realized that with hundreds of ships over huge expanses, the mere act of coordinating them was problematic. I think there is a synergistic effect. I also know a number of naval officers who have admitted to me that the reason they joined the Navy was because Starfleet Command wasn’t hiring.

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26. Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules of Writing

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27. The Avengers and Classical Theism

God and The AvengersWe cannot assume Captain America to have had time between battles to study classical philosophy and theology, but his words could be read as containing implicitly the answer to pop atheism’s “one god further” objection (which I have discussed here, here, and here). The God of classical theism is not “a god” among others, precisely because He isn’t an instance of any kind in the first place, not even a unique instance. He is beyond any genus. He is not “a being” alongside other beings and doesn’t merely “have” or participate in existence alongside all the other things that do. Rather, He just is ipsum esse subsistens or Subsistent Being Itself. He is First Cause not in the sense of being the cause that came before the second, third, fourth, fifth, etc. causes, but rather in the sense of having primal or absolutely underived causal power whereas everything else has causal power in only a derivative and thus secondary way. He is not “a person” but rather the infinite Intellect and Will of which the persons of our experience are mere faint reflections. Since He has no essence distinct from His existence which could even in principle be shared with anything else, He is not the sort of thing there could intelligibly be more than one of. And so forth. Nothing less than this could be the ultimate source of all things and thus nothing less could truly be divine.

Hence the good Captain was correct to insist that there is only one God and that He just isn’t the sort of thing that wears a superhero costume, wields a hammer, can get knocked around by Iron Man, etc.

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28. How-To of the Week: Make the Perfect Sunny Side Up Egg

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29. The First Popular Psychoactive Drug for People Who Were Basically Fine

It as one of the first psychoactive drugs to be used on a large scale on people who were basically fine.

Taking a pill to feel normal, even a pill sanctioned by the medical profession, led to a strange situation: it made people wonder what “normal” really was. What does it mean when people feel more like themselves with the drug than without it? Does the notion of “feeling like themselves” lose its meaning if they need a drug to get them there?

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30.Tip of the Week: Use a Hair Dryer to Painlessly Remove Band-Aids

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31. Five Reasons You Didn’t Win a MacArthur Genius Grant

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32. The Blind Faith of the One-Eyed Matador

Last fall, one of Spain’s greatest matadors took a horn to the face. It was a brutal goring, among the most horrific in the history of bullfighting. Miraculously, Juan Jose Padilla was back in the bullring—sí, fighting bulls—a mere five months later. And in the process of losing half his sight, he somehow managed to double his vision

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33. Forgetfulness – Billy Collins Animated Poetry

  • http://www.twitter.com/johncfarrier John Farrier

    On church discipline as doctor shopping….

    Church is a job that you can’t get fired from. I’ve church members engage in outrageous behavior that would have, had they engaged in it at work, gotten them immediately fired. Stuff like wild temper tantrums, overt lying, malicious gossip and flagrant politicking for power. And the more that a church is struggling, the more that church is an accountability-free zone. Churches often don’t sanctify people but profane and debase them.

  • Pingback: The Bible: Easy to Understand? « The Glorious Deeds of Christ

  • Barry Arrington

    Regarding number 8, I know it is a phrase and not a word, but “begs the question” is used incorrectly far more often than otherwise. It means “to assume one’s conclusion,” but is is almost always used as a substitute for “leads to the question.”

  • Barry Arrington

    Also, did anyone else compare 19 to 8? In 19 the writer makes one of the mistakes identified in 8.

  • Barry Arrington

    The one-eyed matador tortures animals for a living. I despise him and his ilk.

  • http://PoetAndPriest.com Paul Hughes

    Re: #15 … Faith is thinking. It is also feeling, and acting. The reason thinking is emphasized, when it is, has more to do with it being prior to the other two — and because you can never “force” yourself to feel, and you can rarely force yourself to act, but in most cases, if you’re intentional about it (and assuming you have the time) you *can* force yourself to think. Since the passage the quotation refers to *specifically says* — several times — “do not be anxious” we may say that while thinking may be part of doing so, the result will be a different set of … feelings … leading to action. Try only *thinking* that you love, believe in, or will follow Christ. Good luck.


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