Eliot Spitzer and the use of religion in American politics

Anyone writing a satire on American politics would be hard pressed to improve on the plot already oozing out of the New York City comptroller's race. If you haven't been following the story, Eliot Spitzer now finds himself running against a woman who claims she formerly secured prostitutes for the former attorney general's use. Inconvenience, thy name is Kristen Davis! Naturally, Spitzer denies Davis' claims, but his call-girl history reasonably prompts doubts. Shall we hold it against … [Read more...]

The redemptive quality of a story

Flannery O'Connor

In her essay “The Grotesque in Southern Fiction,” Flannery O’Connor writes that readers desire and even need something uplifting in the books that they read. “There is something in us,” she says, “as storytellers and as listeners to stories, that demands the redemptive act, that demands that what falls at least be offered the chance to be restored.” At Thomas Nelson, where I work, we strive to publish stories that are in some sense redemptive. It’s a priority at the … [Read more...]

More tragedy, please

More tragedy, please

Tales of tragedy, crime, and corruption have value for several reasons. One is that those that read them do not usually lead tragic, criminal, and corrupt lives, at least not the extent portrayed in such stories. Don't mistake: Their natures are corrupt. As Paul says in the letter to the Romans, “all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God....” Greed, hatred, lust, lies — most people are marked by these in some measure. We all bear their stain. But forces internal and external, … [Read more...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X