The Books On My Bedside Table

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My actual bedside table

I got so excited discovering what books were on everyone else’s bed-stands (see My Weird Fixation on What People Read at Night) that I forgot to list what books are on my own. They are, right now:

“In the Compny of Cheerful Ladies” (#6 in the awesome “The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency” series) by Alexander McCall Smith

“Tears of the Giraffe” (#2 in the series above)

Three issues of “New Yorker” magazine

“Until I Find You,” by the incredible John Irving

The 6-volume Oxford Jane Austen set

“The Philosphy of Andy Warhol,” by Andy Warhol (which I’ve been reading almost nightly for 25 years)

“A Confederacy of Dunces,” by John Kennedy Toole (which I’ve been reading almost nightly for 25 years)

“The Princess Bride,” by William Goldman (which I’ve been reading almost nightly for 25 years)

“The Bhagavad GitaBhagavad-Gita: The Song of God,” translated by Swami Prabhavananda and Christopher Isherwood (which has been on my bed-stand for for 35 years)

“Why Christianity Must Change or Die,” by John Shelby Spong (which, for the record, I care little for)

“The House at Pooh Corner” by some English guy.

“Winnie the Pooh,” ditto.

“Selected Poems and Two Plays of William Butler Yeats” (I never know what he’s talking about)

“The Portable Faulkner” (I never know what he’s talking about)

“Holidays on Ice,” by David Sedaris

“The Milagro Beanfield War,” by John Nicols

“The Crisis of Islam,” by Bernard Lewis

And … there you have it!

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About John Shore

John Shore (who, fwiw, is straight) is the author of UNFAIR: Christians and the LGBT Question, and three other great books. He is founder of Unfundamentalist Christians (on Facebook here), and executive editor of the Unfundamentalist Christians group blog.  (In total John's two blogs receive some 250,000 views per month.) John is also co-founder of The NALT Christians Project, which was written about by TIME,  The Washington Post, and others. His website is JohnShore.com. You're invited to like John's Facebook page. Don't forget to sign up for his mucho-awesome newsletter.

  • http://jerrisblog.blogspot.com Jerri Harrington

    On my bedside table: God's Chosen Fast, Beth Moore's Breaking Free daily devotionals, Good Housekeeping Magazine,some other magazine, A Non-Tourist Guide to Places of Interest in DC,(I got that for my husband, but I am just as interested….), and my Bible. I do most of my reading during the day, not in bed at night. I have been reading God's Chosen Fast for over a year, and it's one of the best books on spiritual disciplines I have ever read. You'd think I would remember the author…I think he is Albert Lemons, but I'm not sure.

  • http://tonyyork.wordpress.com Tony York

    Just had to point out that there is a pink wall behind that bed stand. I'd have to read too in order fall asleep.. :)

  • http://www.johnshore.wordpress.com John Shore

    That's not pink. It's … it's … okay, fine. It's pink.

    And I don't actually read those books. As I was just telling a friend, I keep those books on my bedside table because it comforts me to imagine, just before I go to sleep, that I'm smart.

  • http://www.johnshore.wordpress.com John Shore

    Jeri: What extremely wholesome bedtime reading! Excellent!

  • http://mymenandme.wordpress.com Janelle

    Love those murder mysteries. I'd DIE to meet Sue Grafton (cat lover and only 6 letters to go) and Robert B. Parker (dog lover). Loved reading about what everyone is reading about. The only thing on my bedside table is dust. We have an iron bed thingee (the word escapes me) that is very uncomfortable to lean against, no matter how many pillows you try to prop up against it. So my evening reading is on the couch, and the coffee table is littered with, currently: James Patterson: The Sixth Target, Jeffrey Archer: A Prisoner of Birth, Randy Pausch: The Last Lecture, Wayne Jacobsen and Dave Coleman: So You Don't Want to go to Church Anymore, Kenneth Oppel: Airborn (my son got it for Christmas and I love it, he's a great Canadian adventure writer for kids), and The Spiderwick Chronicles, which I am reading to my youngest son as bedtime stories. Oh, and several versions of the Bible, in which I am currently reading 1 Peter over and over. Living Stones, so cool.

  • http://tonyyork.wordpress.com Tony York

    Janelle,

    I just taught on 1 Peter chapter 2 this past weekend. And living stones are Way, Way cool.

    I love the analogies to the priests and physical tabernacle/temple to a living church that is made up of a royal priesthood.

    I think it was Tozer that talked about how the Levites(priests) weren't given land when the children of Israel entered Canaan – they got God. And Peter tells us to live as aliens and strangers, royal priests part of a living church… not a building made by hands.

    And then, just after that part he talks about how living in such a way will cause the 'greeks' that had bad things to say about them to glorify God in the day of visitation. Connect that to Chapter 2 of Acts and what was going on there as they 'continually devoted' themselves to 4 things: the apostle's teaching, to fellowship, to break of bread together, and to praying. Later in the chapter he says that they lived with singleness of heart and praised God and found favor with all people.

    Man, that is good stuff. Something that we can aim for in our time.

  • http://mymenandme.wordpress.com Janelle

    Tony,

    I love how Christ is the Living Cornerstone for the Living Stones (us) to build on. To me, that is all about being outside the box religiously. I mean, if Jesus was a “traditional” cornerstone, the other builders wouldn’t have thrown him out. He would have been a perfect fit. But although he was/is the perfect stone on which to build, he was/is not what those religious folks were/are expecting. He didn’t follow the “religion rules”.

    “Present yourselves as building stones for the construction of a sanctuary vibrant with life.” Churching, rather than going to church, if you know what I mean.

    Good stuff, for sure.

  • Mark Lattimore

    Right on about John Irving. "A Prayer For Owen Meaney" is my favorite novel of all time. I started "Until I Find You" a couple of times but life kept getting in the way.

    Explain the appeal of "A Confederacy of Dunces." A lot of people love this book but I couldn't get past the second chapter. Is there something wrong with me?


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