What Do Stay-at-Home Mothers DO All Day?

Every mother is a working mother.

It’s just that some mothers go out into the world and spend their time and their energy in the workplace, advancing someone else’s goals and dreams.

And some mothers expend that same energy building, creating, laboring for those whom they hold most dear in all the world:  their husbands and children.

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I know that not every family can afford to have one of the adult wage-earners stay at home.  I know that some women have worked hard to build a career, and the prospect of giving up prestige and financial freedom for a different, quieter lifestyle is a weighty decision, indeed.

But for those who are able to make that career change, even for a while, the rewards are prodigious.  Motherhood is the most challenging, the most frustrating, and the most rewarding job of all.

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Buzzfeed has posted a short (2 1/2-minute) vimeo, 3 Queens by Matt Bieler, which captures a day in the lives of three women, in three different parts of the country.  It’ll make you laugh and cry.  Check it out.

 

  • Spectrall

    Every mother is a working mother.

    This is true in the trite, meaningless way that all people work, but in any meaningful sense, it is not so. I grew up with parents that both had to work hard to support a family and they did a great job. Suggesting that staying at home while raising children is just as difficult as working a full time job while raising children is insulting to people that weren’t privileged enough to step out of the work force.

    • Erick Ybarra

      Spectrally,

      I was raised with a single mother who also had to work, and I would say that my stay at home wife who takes care of 2 kids is much harder work. Do you have the experience to tell the difference? Do you know good mothers who are stay at home moms? And who are open to children in their life?

      • Spectrall

        Yes, I know stay at home spouses. I think their tasks look vastly easier than those of people that are gainfully employed. The idea that doing less things is harder than doing more things strikes me as ludicrous on its face; in this particular case, I think it’s nothing more than lip service to an ideal.

        • Kathy Schiffer

          I’ve been in both worlds, Spectrally, and I wrote about it a while ago (see link below). Both women who work inside the home and those who work outside have the same number of hours in their day; it’s just that the stay-at-home moms devote their hours and their passion to forming souls. That is infinitely more important than, say, working a cash register or crunching numbers or even teaching someone else’s kids–because a mother’s love will make a difference for eternity. http://kathyschiffer.com/for-mothers-everywhere-on-scrubbing-toilets-and-the-challenger-disaster

          • Spectrall

            You really don’t see how spectacularly insulting that is to mothers that work? Really? Suggesting that children are insufficiently loved because their mothers have to go to work is condescending and insulting to a high degree. I know everyone wants a gold star for what they do, but there’s no real way around the part where it’s easier to do one thing than two things.


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