Person of the Day: St. Quodvultdeus

In the Office of Readings for today, the Feast of the Holy Innocents, is a sermon from St. Quodvultdeus, bishop. “Who?” I thought.  So here is his story: Quodvultdeus was a father of the church.  He lived in Carthage in the early fifth century, and he became a deacon in 421 A.D.  He corresponded with St. Augustine, who served as his spiritual mentor; and like Augustine, he was an opponent of Arianism.  Augustine dedicated some of his writings to Quodvultdeus. When Carthage was … [Read more...]

Would St. Jerome Go to the Library?

St. Jerome

September 30 is the feast of St. Jerome, Doctor of the Church, patron of libraries.  The most scholarly of the church’s early theologians, Jerome has an extensive list of writings.  His commentaries and letters offer a peek into fourth-century life in Rome, but he is probably best known for translating the Bible into Latin (the Vulgate).  Medieval paintings of the saint always show him with a large book. Which has me wondering:  If Jerome, scholar that he was, were alive today, … [Read more...]

The Seashell and the Three-In-One

Augustine of Hippo lived a wild life—abandoning the faith, fathering a child out of wedlock, and rejecting the values of his mother Monica. Monica, however, prayed for her son, that he would turn back to God.  For thirty years, Monica prayed unceasingly for her son—who eventually was converted, and who became one of the Church’s greatest theologians.  He was named Doctor of the Church, and the story of his dramatic conversion gives hope to mothers who pray for their wayward children, … [Read more...]


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