Solomon’s mare

Solomon’s first wife was an Egyptian princess (1 Kings 3:1). She was Solomon’s mare among the chariots of Egypt (Song of Songs 1:9). We can imagine Pharaoh showing Solomon around the capital, displaying his court and his stables and gathering his army to make an impressive military display. Solomon has eyes only for the princess. She stands out among the chariots of Pharaoh. She only is the object of his desire. Military power and violence hold no interest.

It does not last. Solomon begins to multiply wives and to marry foreign women. Solomon’s eyes are no longer on a single woman, and at the same time he begins to find Pharaoh’s horses and chariots desirable. He trades horses, multiplies horses and chariots, begins to trust in the military power that he can get from Egypt (1 Kings 10:26-29). His heart turns to other wives, which means he worships other gods, which means he begins to worship power. Roving sexual desire has an inner connection with unfaithfulness to Yahweh and attraction to the latest military technology.

Beware the promiscuous king, because idolatry and militarism are likely to follow.


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