October 20, 2003

In her monograph on magic and the demonic in Luke-Acts (entitled The Demise of the Devil ), Susan Garrett offers some illuminating comments on Jesus’ declaration that He watched Satan fall from heaven like lightning (Luke 10:17-20): 1) She argues persuasively that Jesus is speaking prophetically of a future fall of Satan. She appeals to the parallel between Jesus’ “I was watching” and the similar phrase that Daniel uses to introduce his prophetic visions (cf. Dan. 7:2, 4, 6, 7,… Read more

October 19, 2003

The same Weekly Standard review mentioned in a previous post gives a brief summary of the editorial introduction to Volume 21 of the Works of Jonathan Edwards , written by Sang Hyun Lee: “Lee claims that Edwards marks a stunning departure from the Western theological tradition by the way he repudiated deism. Eighteenth-century deists depicted a watchmaker god who observes from a distance his self-sustaining world, and Western theology in a similar manner has represented God as ‘externally’ but not… Read more

October 19, 2003

Two very different evaluations of the Enlightenment appear in recent books. First from Robert Darnton, historian of the French Enlightenment, who, according to the reviewer in the October 6 TNR , devotes the first and most substantative essay in his recent book George Washington’s False Teeth to defending the Enlightenment. The reviewer’s summary: “Enlightenment was a cause that galvanized intellectuals committed to tolerance, skepticism, individuals, civil liberty, and cosmopolitanism, and that its values have proved to be the most potent… Read more

October 18, 2003

There’s a breakdown in the traditional typology that links “promised land” with “heaven.” Though the promised land is eschatologically a new heavens and new earth, the typology is more exactly fulfilled in the church’s fulfillment of the great commission on earth. After all, we don’t embark on a “conquest” of heaven ?Eso it can’t be the fulfillment of Canaan. We embark on a conquest of earth, which will eventually be united with heaven at the coming of the Greater Joshua… Read more

October 18, 2003

Moses is the matchmaker who brings the bride to a trysting place with her lover, Yahweh. He is the “friend of the bridegroom” who, like John the Baptist, prepares the bride for her husband. As such, Moses and John are models for all Christian ministry, which is also all about protecting the virgin bride, training and perfecting her, for the consummation of her wedding. Ultimately, this is a work of the Spirit, the divine matchmaker, but the Spirit works through… Read more

October 18, 2003

Something to check: Is Moses the first “horned man” in the Bible? He comes down from the mountain, having seen the glory of God, with “horns” on his head, rays of glory radiating out. This may be the source of the horned man image used elsewhere, in the Psalms for instance: He has raised up my horn like a wild ox and God has raised up a horn of salvation for us in the house of his servant David. It… Read more

October 17, 2003

Douglas A. Campbell argues forcefully for interpreting the phrase ek pisteos (from faith) in Romans 1:17 as a reference to the faithfulness of Christ in his obedience to death. This, in turn, suggests strongly that Paul’s later use of pistis Christou (faith of Christ) as Christ’s own faithfulness rather than our human faith in Jesus. Several of Campbell’s arguments are worth noting: 1) He argues that the phrase ek pisteos is controlled by the use of the phrase in Habakkuk… Read more

October 17, 2003

Douglas A. Campbell argues forcefully for interpreting the phrase ek pisteos (from faith) in Romans 1:17 as a reference to the faithfulness of Christ in his obedience to death. This, in turn, suggests strongly that Paul’s later use of pistis Christou (faith of Christ) as Christ’s own faithfulness rather than our human faith in Jesus. Several of Campbell’s arguments are worth noting: 1) He argues that the phrase ek pisteos is controlled by the use of the phrase in Habakkuk… Read more

October 17, 2003

In a footnote to the aforementioned article, Muller briefly discusses the medieval debates about the atonement. He points out that the medieval doctors stressed the passive obedience almost to the exclusion of the active; the active obedience was merely preparatory, making Christ acceptable or meritorious as a sacrifice. So, the Reformed introduction of the active obedience was actually a move in favor of biblical theology and the gospels. Fair enough. But I stand by my suggestion in the previous post… Read more

October 17, 2003

I came across this from Mark Twain today: “History does not repeat itself but it does rhyme.” Read more

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