It’s Only Fair

Having encouraged people to tear other Christian-film-reviews to pieces with their editing cutlery, I should put myself on the operating table as well. I do this to emphasize that I’m interested in better writing, not in belittling other review writers.

So, here is a somewhat-hurriedly written review of James Redford’s “Spin.”

Feel free to post any comments on what you would do to improve the review. I’m likely to take your advice next time I have a chance to sit down and improve it (which may not be until this weekend, when I can go home and find a few minutes at my desk.)

If I don’t see comments being posted, I’ll assume that somehow, in my twenty minutes at the computer last night, I actually produced something readable.

 

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About Jeffrey Overstreet

Jeffrey Overstreet has two passions: writing fiction, and celebrating art — music, cinema, photography, literature — through writing and teaching. He is the author of a “memoir of dangerous moviegoing” — Through a Screen Darkly. And his four-novel fantasy series, The Auralia Thread, which begins with Auralia's Colors, was published by Random House. He speaks at universities and conferences around the world about understanding art through eyes of faith. He is earning his MFA in Creative Writing at Seattle Pacific University, where he has worked for 11 years as an editor, writer, and communications project manager. His work has been recognized in The New Yorker, TIME, The Seattle Times, IMAGE, Ravi Zacharias International — and Christianity Today, where he served as a film journalist for more than a decade. He recently began a weekly column called "Listening Closer" for Christ and Pop Culture.

  • Josh

    …but Superman is DC, not Marvel…

  • Martin

    Really not bad for 20 minutes. There are about four or five small typos (including a missing word in your opening sentence). The most annoying thing about your review was that you used the cliché “scratches the surface” twice. It could use a little tightening and recasting, but it’s still far better than the previous two examples.

    The film in question sort of sounds like All the Pretty Airplanes—it even features Ruben Blades!

    And I agree you shouldn’t be too hard on young Redford. His dad directed some great films (Ordinary People, A River Runs through It, Quiz Show), but he also directed The Natural, which made him look like a “natural” in the Shakespearean sense. Even good directors have their clunkers.


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