"Ray" pretty much guarantees that Jamie Foxx will win an Oscar.

I’m giving Ray a B+.

Foxx … just give him the Oscar now.

Here’s my full review.

Please notify me of any necessary edits in the comments here, or send me a note at LookingCloserReview@msn.com.

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About Jeffrey Overstreet

Jeffrey Overstreet has two passions: writing fiction, and celebrating art — music, cinema, photography, literature — through writing and teaching. He is the author of a “memoir of dangerous moviegoing” — Through a Screen Darkly. And his four-novel fantasy series, The Auralia Thread, which begins with Auralia's Colors, was published by Random House. He speaks at universities and conferences around the world about understanding art through eyes of faith. He is earning his MFA in Creative Writing at Seattle Pacific University, where he has worked for 11 years as an editor, writer, and communications project manager. His work has been recognized in The New Yorker, TIME, The Seattle Times, IMAGE, Ravi Zacharias International — and Christianity Today, where he served as a film journalist for more than a decade. He recently began a weekly column called "Listening Closer" for Christ and Pop Culture.

  • Anonymous

    I thought of Malick’s films when I read your post. I’ve heard that during filming he cleaves to the actions in the script and only in the editing room takes liberties with breaking up the narrative.

  • Anonymous

    lovely.

  • Denny Wayman

    Jeffery,

    I agree that film can reach us in a whole deeper way than language.
    A good example of the use of visual and musical cinematic art is HERO.

    In my review I wrote:
    The visual mythology of Yimou Zhang transcends the language barriers in his Chinese film, “Ying Xiong” or “Hero.” Inviting us to enter the magical world he has created, we experience his tale with our entire souls and not just our eyes and ears. Entering into the myth that is being told, the visual arts and musical scores make each moment a feast that we don’t want to end as they support the fluid movement of the dancing fighters. Similar in style to “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,” we are now taken to another level of art.

    Denny


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