Are you a Narniac?

Today’s Reel News is up, featuring your big opportunity to work for Disney for no pay, promoting a “masterpiece” that nobody’s seen!

P.S.

Narniacs aren’t the real problem. The real problem comes from nicknamaniacs who must put a label on everything and everybody.

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About Jeffrey Overstreet

Jeffrey Overstreet has two passions: writing fiction, and celebrating art — music, cinema, photography, literature — through writing and teaching. He is the author of a “memoir of dangerous moviegoing” — Through a Screen Darkly. And his four-novel fantasy series, The Auralia Thread, which begins with Auralia's Colors, was published by Random House. He speaks at universities and conferences around the world about understanding art through eyes of faith. He is earning his MFA in Creative Writing at Seattle Pacific University, where he has worked for 11 years as an editor, writer, and communications project manager. His work has been recognized in The New Yorker, TIME, The Seattle Times, IMAGE, Ravi Zacharias International — and Christianity Today, where he served as a film journalist for more than a decade. He recently began a weekly column called "Listening Closer" for Christ and Pop Culture.

  • Chris Durnell

    Business likes to classify everyone as some type of demographic and classify everything as some kind of commodity. However, I think the true problem with Narniacs is that it’s an attempt to create, and therefore control, a brand of people. There are various “geek” cultures out there as a ready market, but before thisI would not say people who like CS Lewis would particularly qualify.


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