Congratulations, Peter and Deanna Chattaway! The twins have arrived!

After three months of bed rest, Deanna Chattaway has given birth, and she and Peter are celebrating the arrival of Elizabeth Joy and Thomas Lawrence. Click here (Peter’s FilmChat blog, of course) for photos and Peter’s awestruck account.

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  • Christian

    “Actually, that’s not quite what I said.”

    –No, it’s not, but I didn’t mean to suggest that it was. I shouldn’t have used quotes; I was trying to capture what I thought you meant.

    “Adam asks, ‘Why? Why has Mike changed?’ I think it’s because he’s come to see the value of human life — whether snuffed out intentionally, or by accident — is the ultimate sort of trespass, and it demands some sense of remorse and contrition. …”

    Adam: “Also, where in the film do you find the evidence to support your interpretation? How do you even know that Mike’s tears were honest ones?”

    –Where is there evidence in the film that it’s about the value of human life, and the heinousness of killing others? It’s everywhere: Melquiades’ killing, the immigrants who heal Mike instead of letting him die, Pete’s refusal to kill Levon Helm’s character, the sheriff’s refusal to gun down Pete when he has him in his crosshairs.

    As for the honesty of Mike’s tears, I don’t think there’s much other choice than to see them as honest, unless you think Jones’ point was to make a film about a deranged man who finally forces a teary “confession” out of a scared, kidnapped cop. Jones has made it pretty clear in interviews that he was going for something closer to my interpretation, but if you don’t accept that when you watch the film, that’s legitimate. The film didn’t work for you. I wouldn’t chalk that up to the film being internally confused, but I can understand why you might see it that way.

  • Adam Walter

    Christian wrote: Adam’s reaction to “Three Burials” is to demand that characters’ motivations be explained clearly. The film is fascinated because of the inscrutability of *some* of the characters’ behavior, and because not all questions are answered.

    Actually, I rather like films that operate on super-rational levels. But not films that are anti-rational or sub-rational.

    BTW, you’re not a fan of Dada art, are you? Not that I think this is anything like a Dadaist film. From all evidence, the film’s internal confusion is unintentional.

    Adam asks, “Why? Why has Mike changed?” I think it’s because he’s come to see the value of human life — whether snuffed out intentionally, or by accident — is the ultimate sort of trespass, and it demands some sense of remorse and contrition.

    Actually, that’s not quite what I said.

    Also, where in the film do you find the evidence to support your interpretation? How do you even know that Mike’s tears were honest ones?

  • Christian

    That should be “The film is fascinatING.” Also, the “ultimate sense of trespass” refers to the “snuff[ing] out” of human life, not to the “value of human life,” although the stupid way I wrote that sentence suggests the latter.

    I wish I could go in and edit the post, but I’ll settle for being able to post here again under the “other” option, which had been “snuffed out” earlier due to some post-ing abuse. I’m glad this non-blogger can submit comments once again.

  • Christian

    Adam’s reaction to “Three Burials” is to demand that characters’ motivations be explained clearly. The film is fascinated because of the inscrutability of *some* of the characters’ behavior, and because not all questions are answered. However, the importance of the ending should not be treated as yet one more aspect of character confusion. It’s the point of the film, the realization of Pete’s mission, the completion of a journey, and the start of a new beginning. Adam asks, “Why? Why has Mike changed?” I think it’s because he’s come to see the value of human life — whether snuffed out intentionally, or by accident — is the ultimate sort of trespass, and it demands some sense of remorse and contrition. Several elements in the film point to that truth, but Mike doesn’t come around until the final moments.

  • opus

    I just watched the Wes Anderson commercial earlier today. Great stuff… my fave part is at the very end when the birds fly right past his face.

    The Coke commercial is quite good too… I had to double-check to make sure it wasn’t directed by Michel Gondry… it looks just like something he’d do.


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