Watkins on Pullman’s intolerance, Narnia’s flaws

Tony Watkins has just published a short but sharp perspective on the tension between Phillip Pullman’s perspective and work, and C.S. Lewis’s perspective and work.

Philip Pullman’s hostility towards The Chronicles of Narnia is a very strong reaction to a mere story, even if it is perhaps over-revered by some. Yes, Lewis’s work contains some serious flaws, but the real problem seems to be that it is a story which expresses and argues for a worldview completely antithetical to Pullman’s. Sadly, his ‘paroxysm of loathing’ … feels distinctly intolerant.

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About Jeffrey Overstreet

Jeffrey Overstreet is the author of a “memoir of dangerous moviegoing” called Through a Screen Darkly, and a four-volume series of fantasy novels called The Auralia Thread, which includes Auralia’s Colors, Cyndere’s Midnight, Raven’s Ladder, and The Ale Boy’s Feast. Jeffrey is a contributing editor for Seattle Pacific University’s Response magazine, and he writes about art, faith, and culture for Image, Filmwell, and his own website, LookingCloser.org. His work has also appeared in Paste, Relevant, Books and Culture, and Christianity Today (where he was a film columnist and critic for almost a decade). He lives in Shoreline, Washington. Visit him on Facebook at facebook.com/jeffreyoverstreethq.

  • sg

    I like it, but then I loved Funeral too, so i would like it.

  • Brett

    Watkins asks one question which I think has an automatic snappy (but true) answer:

    “Indeed, the outspokenness of Pullman’s comments has made him something of a hostage to fortune: how will his own works be read fifty years on?”

    They won’t.


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