“A Christian Voice” in “Children of Men”?

From a comment posted in a previous post, by Mike Harris Stone:

Well I saw Children of Men last night. A fantastic piece of cinema which does, IMHO, go beyond even the filmmaker’s intentions in what it says, much as Wings of Desire did. Interestingly, the original music in the film is by British Composer John Taverner, an Orthodox Christian, so in that one aspect there is a Christian voice in the movie. I agree with your critique of it, Jeffrey.

And by the way, the backlash against the CT critics celebrating Children of Men . . . I keep wondering if some of those offended by the choice might be less offended if they actually Read. The. Review.

I’m hearing “How could they choose that?” Looking back at my original review, I think I spelled it out quite plainly why the film deserves praise (even though, in the end, my personal votes in that poll went for different films). And if that wasn’t enough, well, there’s defense #2, which I posted yesterday at this blog.

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About Jeffrey Overstreet

Jeffrey Overstreet has two passions: writing fiction, and celebrating art — music, cinema, photography, literature — through writing and teaching. He is the author of a “memoir of dangerous moviegoing” — Through a Screen Darkly. And his four-novel fantasy series, The Auralia Thread, which begins with Auralia's Colors, was published by Random House. He speaks at universities and conferences around the world about understanding art through eyes of faith. He is earning his MFA in Creative Writing at Seattle Pacific University, where he has worked for 11 years as an editor, writer, and communications project manager. His work has been recognized in The New Yorker, TIME, The Seattle Times, IMAGE, Ravi Zacharias International — and Christianity Today, where he served as a film journalist for more than a decade. He recently began a weekly column called "Listening Closer" for Christ and Pop Culture.


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