Questions on a Novel Journey

Novel Journey’s Ane Mulligan just posted her conversation with me about Auralia’s Colors. These are the questions she asked:

  • Time to crow: What new book or project do you have coming out?
  • How did you come up with this story? Was there a specific ‘what if’ moment?
  • You write movie reviews for Christianity Today. How did you get into that?
  • Every novelist has a journey. You say on your blog you dreamed about your first novel since you were five. That’s a long road to publication. Tell us about it. How did you find out and what went through your mind?
  • Do you ever bang your head against the wall from the dreaded writer’s block? If so, how do you overcome it?
  • Novelists sometimes dig themselves into a hole over implausible plots, flat characters or a host of other problems. What’s the most difficult part of writing for you?
  • How did you climb out or overcome it?
  • Where do you write: In a cave, a coffeehouse, or a cozy attic nook?
  • What does a typical day look like for you?
  • Some authors report writing 5-10 thousand words a day. Do scenes flow freely from your veins or do you have to tweeze each word out?
  • Briefly take us through your process of writing a novel… from conception to revision.
  • What are a few of your favorite books (not written by you) and why are they favorites?
  • What’s the best writing advice you’ve heard?
  • What do you wish you’d known early in your career that might have saved you some time and/or frustration in writing? In publishing?
  • How much marketing do you do? What have you found that particularly works well for you?
  • Do you have any parting words of advice?
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About Jeffrey Overstreet

Jeffrey Overstreet is the author of a “memoir of dangerous moviegoing” called Through a Screen Darkly, and a four-volume series of fantasy novels called The Auralia Thread, which includes Auralia’s Colors, Cyndere’s Midnight, Raven’s Ladder, and The Ale Boy’s Feast. Jeffrey is a contributing editor for Seattle Pacific University’s Response magazine, and he writes about art, faith, and culture for Image, Filmwell, and his own website, LookingCloser.org. His work has also appeared in Paste, Relevant, Books and Culture, and Christianity Today (where he was a film columnist and critic for almost a decade). He lives in Shoreline, Washington. Visit him on Facebook at facebook.com/jeffreyoverstreethq.


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