Morefield on “Lars and the Real Girl”

Yesterday, Kenneth Morefield posted comments on Lars and the Real Girl. He gets so much of what I love about this film. And his thoughts make me eager to rent it and see it again…

…the community is the hero of Lars and the Real Girl. I can’t think of the last commercial, American film I saw that presented community as a positive force (at least that wasn’t doing so ironically or satirically). Compare the doctor here to the technician in Juno. Compare the pastor and his community here to the one in There Will Be Blood. Compare the portrayal of businesses (like the merchant who gives Bianca a part time job) to that of Michael Clayton. Compare the film’s take on the possibility for healing, growth, or forgiveness with that of Atonement.

Maybe it is the responsibility of art or film to hold a mirror up to the world and show us the cold, hard, truth.

Or maybe, just maybe, on a rare occasion, a film can do something even harder. Maybe, now and again, it can show us the more excellent way, the way that things should be, the way things are beneath the surfaces hardened by cynicism, and scorn, and just plain old weariness.

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About Jeffrey Overstreet

Jeffrey Overstreet has two passions: writing fiction, and celebrating art — music, cinema, photography, literature — through writing and teaching. He is the author of a “memoir of dangerous moviegoing” — Through a Screen Darkly. And his four-novel fantasy series, The Auralia Thread, which begins with Auralia's Colors, was published by Random House. He speaks at universities and conferences around the world about understanding art through eyes of faith. He is earning his MFA in Creative Writing at Seattle Pacific University, where he has worked for 11 years as an editor, writer, and communications project manager. His work has been recognized in The New Yorker, TIME, The Seattle Times, IMAGE, Ravi Zacharias International — and Christianity Today, where he served as a film journalist for more than a decade. He recently began a weekly column called "Listening Closer" for Christ and Pop Culture.

  • http://teleguy2.wordpress.com/ teleguy2

    This film was excellent. My pastor recommended it and on hearing the premise I was quite surprised. I knew it was a film that my wife and I would like, but I was not sure that our congregation would be too “cool with it”.

    What a great, redemptive film. Not since Tom Hank’s Wilson character have I so loved an inanimate object.

  • kenmorefield

    Thanks for the shout out, Jeff.


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