Living in the Tension (LITT) Community Gathering

Each LITT will start at 7pm in Room 120 at 5255 N. Ashland Ave in Chicago. Here are the remaining dates and forum topics:

June 25: Gay Pride Parade: Original Intent and Current Purpose

July 22: I Do Exist—Ex Gay Viewing and Discussion

Aug 11: Discussion with a Gay Secular Person

Aug 27: Discussion with an Ex-Gay Person

Sep 17: Discussion with a Gay Christian

Oct 8: Secret Confessions (Oct 11th National Coming Out Day)

Nov 5: Gay Marriage

Nov 17: Discussion with a Straight Conservative Christian

Dec 3: Discussion with a Celibate Person

Dec 14: The Actual Argument

Here is a reminder of why The Marin Foundation hosts these discussions:

Purpose for Living in the Tension Community Gathering:

Christians need to start willfully planting themselves in the middle of some very uncomfortable places—making a conscious commitment to stay in that place with the GLBT community. In 1963 Martin Luther King Jr. was locked up in a jail in Birmingham, Alabama. In a letter to confront his fellow white clergymen, MLK reflected on his life’s work to that point and said: “I must confess that I am not afraid of the world tension. I have earnestly opposed violent tension my whole life, but there is a type of constructive, non-violent tension which is necessary for growth.”

I’m going to be real right now—the Christian community has been running from that constructive, non-violent tension for too long when it comes to gays and lesbians. The productive growth that MLK was talking about only comes retrospectively, after much time has been spent immersed in tension filled areas with what we are most uneasy about. Those tension-filled areas are dirty, uncomfortable, confusing, overbearing and uneasy. And they’re worth every minute for the kingdom we so boldly claim ourselves to be a part of.

Mission Statement:

For gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, ex-gay, celibate and straight (progressive and conservative) people to all willfully enter into a place of constructive tension, intentionally forming a community that peacefully and productively takes on the most divisive topics within the culture war that is faith and sexuality.

Why:

Culture wants to resolve conflict—we want to use our different communities’ filtration systems to elevate the conversation through the tension. Get past the stereotypes. Learn and practice what it means to live in unanswerable questions. Shift the paradigm away from a ‘fix it’ culture to one that turns hearts onto Christ amongst the most uncomfortable places.

Stay. Commit. Reconcile. Grow.

He was a Jewish carpenter and therefore I build bridges ©

Much love.
http://www.themarinfoundation.org/

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About Andrew Marin

Andrew Marin is President and Founder of The Marin Foundation (www.themarinfoundation.org). He is author of the award winning book Love Is an Orientation (2009), its interactive DVD curriculum (2011), and recently an academic ebook titled Our Last Option: How a New Approach to Civility can Save the Public Square (2013). Andrew is a regular contributor to a variety of media outlets and frequently lectures at universities around the world. Since 2010 Andrew has been asked by the United Nations to advise their various agencies on issues of bridging opposing worldviews, civic engagement, and theological aspects of reconciliation. For twelve years he lived in the LGBT Boystown neighborhood of Chicago, and is currently based St. Andrews, Scotland, where he is teaching and researching at the University of St. Andrews earning his PhD in Constructive Theology with a focus on the Theology of Culture. Andrew's research centers on the cultural, political, and religious dynamics of reconciliation. Andrew is married to Brenda, and you can find him elsewhere on Twitter (@Andrew_Marin), Facebook (AndrewMarin01), and Instagram (@andrewmarin1).

  • Anonymous

    I agree with your ministry, of course! But I don't consider dealing with GLBTs as dirty, etc.(whatever you said – my memory is bad!). It may be for many, but some of us are interested & committed to reaching out!

  • Anonymous

    I also don't agree with the word progressive as a substitute for liberal. Some conservative ideas are also very progressive!
    Also some 'liberal' ideas are embraced by conservatives!
    Thanx!

  • Andrew Marin

    When I said dirty, I was not referring to GLBT folks as dirty – I was referring to the "constructive place of tension" that is so foreign to both communities, that many times it seems dirty, uncomfortable, overbearing, etc – all things that would tend to cause us all to run away.

    As for the word progressive, I understand what you're saying but I can never win with that one or liberal or conservative or traditional or whatever structural people-group I am referring to. Good point though.


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