Interview on America’s Most Listened to Christian Program

I’m back from a WONDERFUL vacation (no Blackberry for 6 days was close to the best thing I’ve ever experienced!), and what a better way to be greeted back then by an interview on The Frank Pastore Show – America’s most listened to Christian radio program. I have been on air with Frank one other time, and it was one of the most intriguing and best segments I have ever done. Frank is a great host, asks great questions, and I’m looking forward to tonight. You can listen live here (click the Listen Live button at the very bottom of the page), or you can even call in and ask questions live as well, starting at 6:55pm CST.

Lots to talk about post-vacation, and I’m looking forward to catching up with all the comments while I was gone.

Much love.
www.themarinfoundation.org

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About Andrew Marin

Andrew Marin is President and Founder of The Marin Foundation (www.themarinfoundation.org). He is author of the award winning book Love Is an Orientation (2009), its interactive DVD curriculum (2011), and recently an academic ebook titled Our Last Option: How a New Approach to Civility can Save the Public Square (2013). Andrew is a regular contributor to a variety of media outlets and frequently lectures at universities around the world. Since 2010 Andrew has been asked by the United Nations to advise their various agencies on issues of bridging opposing worldviews, civic engagement, and theological aspects of reconciliation. For twelve years he lived in the LGBT Boystown neighborhood of Chicago, and is currently based St. Andrews, Scotland, where he is teaching and researching at the University of St. Andrews earning his PhD in Constructive Theology with a focus on the Theology of Culture. Andrew's research centers on the cultural, political, and religious dynamics of reconciliation. Andrew is married to Brenda, and you can find him elsewhere on Twitter (@Andrew_Marin), Facebook (AndrewMarin01), and Instagram (@andrewmarin1).

  • Jon Trouten

    I'm listening to the show on podcast. I still don't get the goal of your approach. Lots of discussion about ex-gays or when exactly one gets the right to talk with gay people about their negative thoughts about homosexuality. Or disapproving thoughts on pro-gay theology.I can't stop feeling like people are just in this holding pattern waiting for people like me to get it right. To leave our same-sex spouses or to leave "the lifestyle".Unfortunately, most of the interviews that I read or hear are coming from traditional Christian media sources so I never hear anyone call who's not trying to cope with having a gay kid or friend or who's saying that s/he's now ex-gay.I really need to call one of these shows sometime from the perspective of a married gay Christian male with kids who has no intention of abandoning my familiy.

  • Andrew Marin

    Hi Jon!

    My approach vs. the questions and outside perceptions of what I'm all about are two different things. Whenever I'm on a conservative Christian show the questions will always generally be the same, because that is the perspective of where they're coming from – an "ex-gay" and "lifestyle" and against "pro-gay theology" place.

    Moving a faith community in a more understanding, non-volitile, non-traditional direction (in my opinion) is beyond moving the Titanic. Why it has never worked in the past (in either direction) is because both ends of the spectrum are trying to convince the other they are right, and the other is wrong (what I call in my book as "living in a false model of the ideal situation").

    My main thesis is that has to stop first, before (and I literally mean "before") any significant understanding, or even productive conversations can actually take place.

    Therefore, meeting a community where they're at (whether conservative or GLBT) is the point of what I'm trying to do with these interviews – the conversation will not look the same depending on which group I'm talking to (although my overall message will be the same) because I'm not trying to talk past people and where they're currently at (as is traditionally done), I am talking to people in their current state of being and understanding.

    And you do bring up a GREAT point…at some point those shows need to hear your voice, because many of them don't believe people like you exist (even though they might conseptually understand you do exist). As corny as this sounds: when it's real, it's real. And you're real and so is your life and that you're not going to abandon your family. And for that I am ever appriciative in being in this journey with you (us), because a bridge can't be built from one side.

    Much love.

  • Anonymous

    I just heard the podcast & can see how Jon might be offended.
    But, I am so glad you can keep getting on these shows. The word is getting out!
    BTW, does the podcast end prematurely? It stopped before you said good-by or commented on the 'ex-gay' guy.

  • Jon Trouten

    Anonymous: Make sure that you heard the second hour of Andrew's appearance. That second hour is its own podcast (if that makes sense…). I listened to a portion of the first hour live (and then left to watch the new season premier of Torchwood) and then listened to the second hour yesterday on podcast.

    I don't know if it's that I'm offended. I mean, if that one guy wants to be ex-gay, that's his journey. But I feel conflicted by messages and sometimes feel like too many church people are reaching out to gay people. But their ultimate goal is the same: to de-gay people. Internet Monk seems like one of these folks, for example and it drives me nuts.

  • Andrew Marin

    Jon – I think you hit it on the head when you mentioned the ex-gay guy. That is his journey. But what I think a lot of conservative folks miss, is that if they are willing to validate that guy's experience as legitimate to him, they must also do the same to you and your journey.

    I was once told by an ex-gay person in their defense of being ex-gay: "it's not free will unless I have the option to go in the other direction." And he was talking about his freedom to want to be ex-gay. However what I said back to him is, "that is true, and it also goes for gay Christians as well if you are demanding that option for yourself." It's just one of those things that get overlooked in the validation/affirmation debate within the Church wanting to look at what they feel is worthy of validation.


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