Divine Guidance Through Dreams and Visions


Part 12 of series:
How Does God Guide Us?

So far in this series I’ve shown that God guides us through circumstances, Scripture, community, and reason. Those who especially liked my last post on divine guidance through reason might find themselves a bit uncomfortable with today’s post.

I must admit that the subject of guidance through dreams and visions does not reflect my personal experience to any great extent. In fact, I feel most comfortable among Christians who are guided by thinking, not by visions and dreams. But as a biblically-committed Christian, I must not truncate my understanding of God’s activity by my own limited experience, no matter how tempting that may be. Rather, I must let the Bible speak. For this reason, I recognize the possibility of spiritual guidance through dreams and visions. Whether we are sleeping or awake, the Holy Spirit can reveal God’s will to us through inspired visual images.

Rembrandt, The Dream of St. Joseph, 1650-55

Throughout the Bible, God communicates with his people through visionary experiences. In Genesis 15, the Lord speaks to Abraham in a vision (Gen 15:1). A few chapters later, God speaks to the gentile king Abimelech in a dream (Gen 20:3). So it goes throughout the Old Testament stories. The New Testament begins on a similar note, with an angel appearing in a dream to Joseph, telling him that his fiancée is pregnant by the Holy Spirit (Matt 1:20). Not long afterwards, Joseph receives direction to go to Egypt as, once again, an angel speaks to him in a dream (Matt 2:13).

If we were to think that things like this happened only for biblical characters, the promise of Joel corrects that misconception. Several centuries before Christ, the Lord spoke through this Jewish prophet:

Then after I have poured out my rains again, I will pour out my Spirit upon all people. Your sons and daughters will prophesy. Your old men will dream dreams. Your young men will see visions. In those days, I will pour out my Spirit even on servants, men and women alike (Joel 2:28-29).

Seven weeks after Jesus’ resurrection, God poured out his Spirit as promised by Joel. Peter, preaching the first Christian sermon on the Jewish festival of Pentecost, quotes from Joel’s prophecy to explain what has happened to the followers of Jesus who have just received the filling of the Spirit (Acts 2:16-21). The fulfillment of this prophecy at this time implies that Christians, both old and young, will experience divine guidance through dreams and visions.

The rest of the book of Acts illustrates this implication as the Holy Spirit guides the early Christians through extraordinary visual experiences. In Acts 16, for example, the Spirit at first spoke to Paul and Silas, telling them not to evangelize in the Roman provinces of Asia and Bithynia. Then Paul had a vision in the night, in which a man from northern Greece asked him, “Come over here and help us.” The evangelists quickly left for that region, believing that God had called them to preach there (Acts 19:6-10). Later on, when Paul’s ministry in Corinth brought on Jewish wrath, God inspired and affirmed Paul through another vision:

One night the Lord spoke to Paul in a vision and told him, “Don’t be afraid! Speak out! Don’t be silent! For I am with you, and no one will harm you because many people here in this city belong to me.” So Paul stayed there for the next year and a half, teaching the word of God (Acts 18:9-11)

Of course, as we have noted with respect to other forms of guidance, that which we derive from dreams and visions must also be tested by Scripture in the context of prayerful, reasonable Christian community. Throughout history, heretical theologies have often originated in the visions of their founders, visions inspired by something other than the Holy Spirit. The New Testament letter from Jude refers to false teachers as “dreamers” (Jude 1:8). But, for those of us inclined to exalt rationality far above visions, I daresay that most modern heresy stems from thinking, not dreaming.

I know a woman named Sandy who, years ago, had a dream in which she and her husband were missionaries in a city she had never heard of, in a country on the other side of the globe from where they were presently living. As she shared this dream with her husband and with her church, they all began to believe that Sandy had indeed heard from the Holy Spirit, even though she and her husband were not missionaries and the city revealed was in a country that prohibited the entrance of all missionaries. Years of patient discernment followed, as this couple sought to follow God’s leading. He confirmed what Sandy had dreamed in hundreds of ways. Many, many years later, through a most amazing series of divine interventions, the dream was fulfilled, as they began to minister in the very city whose name had once revealed in a dream. A skeptic would scoffingly say that this was a self-fulfilling prophecy. But, knowing the journey of Sandy and her husband, I stand amazed at the grace of God who still speaks to us, as promised, through dreams and visions. (For the safety of Sandy and her husband, I have not used her real name and I cannot divulge the country in which she serves.)

Yet, divine guidance by circumstances, Scripture, community, and dreams and visions isn’t all. In my next post I’ll explore still another way in which God guides us.

  • Anonymous

    I have two friends, both of whom are committed Christians, who receive dreams that come true.  One time, it even saved someone’s life (he needed to go to the doctor, and my friend dreamt that he had a serious medical condition).  Like you said, it always must be tested against the Word of God, but we who do not experience it too often discount it as illegitimate. But I have learned to really listen to both my friends’ dreams.

  • David

    Very interesting article/series Mark. I would wish to suggest that there is much more which needs to be said on this matter of dreams/visions. For example what is the current “state of play” concerning  dreams/visions and personal  revelations in the church today? It seems that that we have basically a two-tier body of Christ in which the  chrismatic church operates almost wholy on a hermeneutic of visions/dreams/new relevations and unorthordox exegesis and the other protestant component on a hermeneutic of scholarly and acadmecially-rigorous exegesis .

  • Anonymous

    Thanks, Tim.

  • Anonymous

    David: Thanks for your comment. You are absolutely right about the need for more conversation about dreams and visions today. That’s not where I’m going right now, directly. But, indirectly, this whole series is demonstrating that there are many ways in which God guides us. Relying solely on one way, such as dreams and visions, would be at best inadequate, and at worst, misleading. Sadly, this is often the case for Christians who are “into” dreams and visions but discount things like Scripture, reason, etc.

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  • Alice Linsley

    I’ve been guided by dreams from God. The more important they were the more they disturbed me at the time. They were later shown to be prophetic. Having said that, I offer a word of caution.  I was trained in Jungian dream analysis and I had kept 16 years of deam journals so that I was able to see recurring symbols and patterns. No decisions were made soley on the basis of dreams.  As in Sandy’s case other factors must be taken into consideration, the Bible most especially.

    Divine guidance in dreams often employs biblical symbolism: the  pearl of great price was an important one for me.  The more thoroughly we are immersed in Scripture, the more this will be true.

  • Anonymous

    Thanks, Alice, for this insightful comment.

  • On Higherground

    Great subject and article, very precise as well!!!


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