An Ode to Copies

In The Millions, Nick Ripatrazone writes an ode to photocopies: 1. I make too many copies. 2. When using even the best machines, including those newly serviced and primed, a double-sided job is a risk. I say prayers while the sheets are sucked through the feeder. Hail Mary, full of grace(the sheets disappear), the Lord is with thee (the [Read More…]

How Technology is Enriching My Season of Thanksgiving

If you think of technology and Thanksgiving, what comes immediately to mind? You might think of watching football on some giant screen of a million pixels. Or you might think of the technology that enables you to fly a long distance to be back with your family. Maybe the tech that enriches your Thanksgiving is [Read More…]

Absolutely, “Interstellar” Is a (r)eligious Movie

Have you seen the mind-bending Interstellar yet? I did, last week, and in Christianity Today I wrote about its religious dimensions: To me it seems that Interstellar, perhaps more than any of Nolan’s films to date, positively resounds with religious—even Christian—stuff that might not ring as loudly if you weren’t steeped in it to begin with. To wit: Cooper promises [Read More…]

Sharing Faith Online?

Something to chew on: only one in five Americans share their faith online, says the Pew Research Religion & Public Life Project: In an average week, one-in-five Americans share their religious faith online, about the same percentage that tune in to religious talk radio, watch religious TV programs or listen to Christian rock music. And [Read More…]

How recaps changed the way we think about TV – and our lives

Buried deep within this fascinating post about how TV episode recaps changed the way we think about both TV and our lives is a bold assertion: Our real-life ethical debates tend to bottom out at this point – the point at which, despite living in the information age, we can claim in Facebook threads that [Read More…]

A Subtle Grace

My friend Callie wrote a marvelous essay on writing (or not writing), reading, and life getting in the way. It made me want to write! My study is a nook on our second floor. My desk faces a window that boasts a view of baby oak trees that were planted about ten years ago. Brick [Read More…]

Re-Reading the Same Story

Over at Relief, my friend Ross Gale writes about re-reading the past, and writing a different future: A recently divorced friend told me how he and his ex-wife have different stories about how they met. His version is that he approached her at a party. Her version is that she introduced herself in a class. They [Read More…]

Your Labor is a Work of Art

Over at The High Calling, Randy Kilgore points that our work for God is, in some very real way, an art – one that anyone can share in. So what about our work transcends time and becomes something eternal? We sometimes believe that Christians are the only workers capable of doing the right thing or even [Read More…]

Hack Your Cooking

Just for fun: here are nine pretty awesome “hacks” for cooks: Read the rest here. [Read more…]

Saying Goodbye for Good

Wesley Hill wrote a great column for Christianity Today about a topic I think about often: how we say goodbye, and why our bodies matter in that. Christians believe not only in a future bodily resurrection. We also believe in the importance of our bodily lives now, with all the benefits that physical companionship entails. Food prepared [Read More…]

Beauty is Embarassing

In The Curator, Janice Blakely looks at a documentary she watched almost accidentally, then couldn’t stop watching, and what she learned: I used to watch Netflix documentaries on my laptop while getting ready for work. One particular morning, without pretense or expectation, I clicked on the documentary Beauty is Embarrassing, and then, about twenty minutes into the [Read More…]

Labor in the Dark

I really enjoyed this reflection from Howard Butt Jr., posted at The High Calling, about Toscanini and why we can’t dare give up: Howard Butt Jr. shares another encouraging video about faith and work. Sometimes success means long hours of work and preparation, just so we’re ready when the moment comes. It’s easy to get discouraged [Read More…]

Toward a Definition of “Religious Movies”

Last week, I got the itch to write about how we talk about what a “religious” movie is. So I did, and if you’re interested in the topic, you might find the post useful: . . . there’s a wide gulf between the various definitions of religious moviesthat we’ve been using. But because we’re using the same [Read More…]

What If Age is Nothing But a Mind-Set?

The New York Times reports on an old study about age, and whether it may merely be a state of mind: Langer did not try to replicate the study — mostly because it was so complicated and expensive; every time she thought about trying it again, she talked herself out of it. Then in 2010, [Read More…]

Lila and the Religious Novelist

Here’s a great review from The New Republic of Marilynne Robinson’s highly acclaimed latest novel, Lila: Marilynne Robinson is one of the great religious novelists, not only of our age, but any age. Reading her new novel Lila, one wonders how critics could worry that American fiction has lost its faith, though such worries make one think there [Read More…]

The Problem with Positive Thinking

Here’s a fascinating piece from the New York Times about the problem with positive thinking (and a solution): Positive thinking fools our minds into perceiving that we’ve already attained our goal, slackening our readiness to pursue it. Some critics of positive thinking have advised people to discard all happy talk and “get real” by dwelling on [Read More…]


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