The Power of Storytelling

There’s a lot of talk in the business world about how important it is to learn to tell good stories when you’re trying to build your brand or business. But as Denis Haack points out over at The High Calling, there’s more to it than that: The nonprofit I direct knows that if our Board [Read More…]

Creativity Creep

At The New Yorker, Joshua Rothman has some interesting stuff to say about “creativity creep”: Every culture elects some central virtues, and creativity is one of ours. In fact, right now, we’re living through a creativity boom. Few qualities are more sought after, few skills more envied. Everyone wants to be more creative—how else, we think, [Read More…]

Work less, do more, live better

Patience Schell reminds us that we might want to reconsider longer hours if we actually want to do good work: Some years ago, I heard that a colleague characterised me as “someone who didn’t work weekends”. This description was not meant as a compliment. It’s true that I make a concerted effort to keep something approximating normal [Read More…]

Work/Life Separation

I frequently work from home, as does my husband, and it’s been a process of trial and error to figure out how to do that well. I wish I’d read this piece from 99U on work/life separation: Emotional traffic through that door moves in both directions: good news in one arena can lead to positive [Read More…]

Why Can’t Men Be Friends?

Over at Christianity Today, they’re asking a provocative question: why can’t men be friends? As a single person, I acutely need intimacy and loyalty from my friends. I’m eager for them to say to me, “We love you because you’re ours,” without leaving an escape clause. Part of the reason I need that kind of friendship is [Read More…]

Quotidian Magic

In The Curator, Josh Gotwalt writes about Boyhood, the movie that is turning out to be the talk of the year: In his essay, which Emily Belz cited in her review for WORLD,  “E Unibus Pluram” David Foster Wallace critiques the stylized conceits of contemporary cinema and television as meretriciously catering to our desire to transcend our average daily lives. These hysterical [Read More…]

A Letter to My Younger Self: Three Crucial Needs in Your Life

Over at The High Calling, they’ve been running a series of “letters to my younger self.” I especially liked Bob Robinson’s letter: Not only was Richard good at what he did, he had developed a reputation for honesty and integrity. People knew that his word was solid and that they could trust him. His clients [Read More…]

The Oldest Story: Broadchurch and True Detective

At Christianity Today, I wrote about Broadchurch and True Detective and the situation in Ferguson, and whether or not I am part of the problem: But there’s one very important thing both shows do, something that Christians, frankly, need to do better in their storytelling: they understand intuitively that sin is both a personal and a corporate matter. Sin is something in [Read More…]

The Power of Privileged Words

Over at Christ and Pop Culture, Drew Dixon writes some powerful words about, well, words, in the wake of the Redskins kerfuffle: A gospel-centered perspective on words calls us to speak in such a way that prioritizes the impact of our words on our neighbors over our personal perception of them. Perhaps the greatest lie we [Read More…]

Bearing New Images: Miyazaki

Hayao Miyazaki has brought joy to people all over the world with his movies, like Castle in the Sky, Princess Mononoke, and Howl’s Moving Castle. But he’s retiring, and his studio is shutting down. So now’s the time to read a bit more – including some surprising truths about Miyazaki – here in The Curator: Through their triumphs, Miyazaki’s [Read More…]

Is It “Goodbye Evangelicalism” or “We Join You In Your Suffering”?

Thabiti Anyabwile wrote a remarkable post about Ferguson and the failure of movement evangelicalism: When James Cone wrote A Black Theology of Liberation in the late 1960s, he was attempting to provide a theological framework for understanding and guiding the feelings and actions of African-American protestors. He wrote in the wake of a deadly riot in Detroit. [Read More…]

Grieving in a Social Media World

Over at Christianity Today, Ken Morefield writes about how to grieve in a social media world: As I advanced in years, my peers began catching up to me in terms of being initiated with grief, but my head start always seemed to give me an advantage at avoiding the really big mistakes we all make when [Read More…]

Helping Churches Helping Ferguson

It’s definitely been difficult to watch what’s happening in Ferguson over the past few weeks, and if you’re like me, you don’t know what to do. At OnFaith, they’re writing about ways you can help the churches that are helping Ferguson. It’s worth a look. [Read more…]

Christians’ Unbiblical Approach to “Biblical” Movies

Over at Christ & Pop Culture, E. Stephen Burnett has some good reminders for Christians as we anticipate the release of Exodus: Gods and Kings: I can still recall when evangelicals feared that The Prince of Egypt would show the liberal mainline theologians’ perversion of the scene: a ragtag band of slaves slopping through a decidedly non-miraculously-parted “sea of [Read More…]

A Life of Prayer Amidst News of Death

Every week there’s a tragedy for someone, just as every week brings some joy, too. But the last few weeks have seemed especially difficult, with strife, chaos, and unspeakable horrors being visited on people all over the world. So this piece from Art House America is apt: For me, the news about Iraq is a [Read More…]

‘The Giver’ Keeps Giving

Over at my blog at Christianity Today, I published a guest post from my colleague Elissa Cooper, who is an assistant editor at CT. She saw an advance screening of The Giver and wrote about how the film’s story keeps giving, and the danger of not facing truth as children: Four and a half years ago, as [Read More…]


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