A Doubter in the Holy Land

In The New York Times, the writer and literary critic Maud Newton – who was raised in a fervently religious household and now describes her own religious views as “uncertain” – writes about visiting the Holy Land: When I was young, my mother had a feverish conversion and started a church in our living room. I’d [Read More...]

A Seamless Calling

Over at the InterVarsity website “The Well,” my Christianity Today colleague Katelyn Beaty wrote a lovely profile of Dr. Karen Swallow Prior, of Liberty University, and her “seamless vocation”: Now, I’m getting to see Karen — who is spending this break finishing a biography of social reformer and abolitionist Hannah More — in her daily [Read More...]

A Thread Called Grace

My friend Jon Merritt is a brave, wise writer, and everyone should read the excerpt from his new book that appears in April’s Christianity Today : I can’t tell you how many times something like this occurred. I remember those three vividly, and when I let my mind wander, I can still see the events in my [Read More...]

Lenten Reflections on the Apostle’s Creed

Every week in church, we recite the Apostle’s Creed. I didn’t grow up doing this, so it took me a while to memorize it, and I find it to be very meaningful every week. So I found this meditation especially meaningful, in which the author thinks through each phrase of the creed. If you’re not [Read More...]

Creativity and Minecraft

Here’s an interesting piece: the case for creating — and video games: Things progressed. Servers popped up where players could work together in a world. Some players replicated real-world buildings and spaces. Conferences were held. People started to wonder about applications outside of video games: education? design? urban planning? Mojang, the maker of Minecraft, is now [Read More...]

A Year of Grieving Dangerously

Over at Christianity Today, an absolutely compelling interview with Kay Warren (Rick Warren’s wife) about their year of “grieving dangerously” after their son Matthew’s tragic suicide last year: I said at Matthew’s memorial service, “We’re devastated, but not destroyed.” I don’t know that you ever stop being devastated by catastrophic loss. In the last year-and-a-half of [Read More...]

The First Baseball

I spent a couple hours this weekend first compiling and then keeping an eye on my fantasy baseball draft. I’m in a league with six of my colleagues and seven of our students. It’s the first year I’ve played, but I grew up watching the Red Sox (my Dad was born and raised in south [Read More...]

Sports for the Glory of God

March Madness is upon us, and with it, all things basketball are important once again. The High Calling has this interview about “sports for the glory of God” with Pastor Stephen Chen, who serves as a pastor to, among others, NBA star Jeremy Lin: Intelligent, high achieving people can be good because they want to [Read More...]

The Importance of Family Farming

The Curator (which has a new look!) published an interesting little piece on the trend toward transparency in food systems and the importance of a very old institution: We should be encouraged to note that a people-based food system isn’t just a trend; it’s the model by which most of the world’s food is grown. Family [Read More...]

The Pointlessness of Unplugging

We often talk about the importance of stepping away from our screens and iDevices in order to “unplug.” Going cold turkey, we feel, will help us decrease our dependence on our devices. But Casey N. Cep had a fascinating piece over at the New Yorker‘s culture blog about “the pointlessness of unplugging”: Unplugging from devices [Read More...]

Running as Therapy

I started running about a year and a half ago, more or less seriously (with some weather-induced breaks), and a little over a week ago I ran the New York City Half Marathon, my fifth race at that distance. It was very cold, and the course was challenging, and my time wasn’t quite as good [Read More...]

What’s With the Doppelgangers?

There’s a whole bunch of movies about doppelgangers (someone’s exact double) coming out in the next month or so. Over at The Atlantic, I wrote about that, and speculated on why this may be (hint–maybe the Internet has something to do with it): That mainlined update on everyone else’s life, I think, taps into the root [Read More...]

Growing Up With Each Other

I wrote a little blog post over at Relief Journal‘s blog about the movie Her and how relationships make us mature: In the days since I saw the film the second time and noted how the film lingers, at the end, on a shot of Theodore and Amy, I’ve thought about whom, exactly, the titular Her is. Maybe it’s [Read More...]

Productivity Tips – from the SAT

Two weeks ago, the news broke that the College Board is changing the SAT, the test that nearly every high school junior and senior takes (and that decades of high school graduates remember with either rueful fondness or PTSD). Over at The High Calling, Marcus Goodyear considers productivity tips gleaned from the switch: No one can [Read More...]

Notes from a Pilgrimage

My friend Stephen started a review of Christian Wiman’s memoir My Bright Abyss a year ago, and finished it a few weeks ago. The result is a beautiful melding of the personal and the critical: On this trip to Kentucky, I’m staying in a small cottage overlooking the pond at the back of Bethany Springs (the [Read More...]


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