“Calvary” and the High Risks of Pursuing a Vocation

The film Calvary, which features Brendan Gleeson as a good priest staring down the end of a gun barrel, has been in theaters for a few weeks. The High Calling writes about the film and vocation: There is a cost to vocational calling, not just to the called, but also, and perhaps more so, to [Read More...]

On Adventure

In In Earnest, Denton Josey writes about how he learned to love adventure on a missions trip to Honduras, and how that’s shaped his life: My life has become a lot less predictable. I see that as a direct result of choosing to seek out adventure. Part of adventure is not knowing how things will turn [Read More...]

Loving the Faceless Portrait

Faceless portraits seem like they’re all the rage these days – and at Art House America, Lindsay Crandall talks about why she loves them, and includes a number of hers: Last year, as more people began asking me to take their picture, I sort of stumbled into portrait photography. I started a small photography business [Read More...]

Philosophy, PB & J’s, and Bogotá

Over at Fieldnotes, Jamaica Abare reflects on what changed when her vocation grew to include motherhood: Although she admits that in the past she dreaded the child-raising stage of life, one of her friends in graduate school used to talk to her toddlers as if they were philosophers, breaking down profound truths about life into [Read More...]

Your Work Matters, Even When It Feels Like It Doesn’t

A welcome reminder from The High Calling for this Monday: your work matters (even when it feels like it doesn’t). Blogger and Chief Creative Officer at iDoneThis Janet Choi quotes authors Teresa Amabile and Steven Kramer from their book The Progress Principle, “What matters is whether you perceive your work as contributing value to something or someone who matters (even your [Read More...]

Why Make a Beautiful Bible?

At Christ and Pop Culture, Jason Morehead writes about the Bibliotheca project and asks, what’s the point of making the Bible more beautiful? Similar things could be said about Bibliotheca. All of that time, money, and effort could be put towards something more practical and necessary, like translating the Bible into a language that doesn’t have it [Read More...]

Adventuring Alone

Tiffany Owens writes at In Earnest about adventuring alone (something I rather enjoy, too): Let’s begin with definitions. By solo trip, I mean a deliberate choice to enjoy a journey and destination without traveling with anyone or scheduling any meetups with friends. Of course, you might make new friends in the process, which is part of [Read More...]

The Hidden Blessing of Infertility

Over at Christianity Today, Karen Swallow Prior wrote about an often-difficult topic: the hidden blessing of infertility. My husband and I decided that further procedures were off the table. Although we are Baptists, we believe in the principles set forth in the Catholic Church’s Donum Vitae (“The Gift of Life”), which distinguishes between medical interventions that assist the marital union in [Read More...]

Rituals of Embodied (Coffee)

Over at Front Porch Republic, David Walbert wrote about rituals of embodiedness – prompted by his new coffee mill: I admit I don’t much care who writes the protocols for the ways I interact with my home, nor whether I have a choice of two or five or ten such protocols. What I care about [Read More...]

Catholics and Protestants Together?

This week at QIdeas, the question has been an interesting one: can Catholics and Protestants work together? The responses are interesting, including two videos and three articles that cover some of the challenges – and encouraging developments – across denominational barriers. Take a peek. [Read more...]

The Good Ministers

Last week at Christianity Today, I enlisted my friends to help come up with a list of some of our favorite “good” ministers in movies and TV from the past decade. Of course, it’s not an exhaustive list, and there are plenty of notable omissions. But it’s a good start, we think. The list is [Read More...]

What Does Rest Look Like?

Comment held a symposium, asking writers how they are working at rest this summer. It’s worth reading. For instance, here’s Norman Wirzba: The opposite of rest is not activity but restlessness. That is, I need to rest so I can calm down and discern how the world around me is a place of so much beauty [Read More...]

Life, Death, and Vegetables

Over at Art House America, Christie Purifoy writes about life, death, and . . . vegetables: I look forward to the beets for weeks and then, inevitably, I ignore them for a moment only to find that they have grown to the size of softballs and must be fed to the chickens. I tell myself they are [Read More...]

Become a Better Online Reader

At the New Yorker, Maria Konnikova looks at how to become a better online reader: In new research that she and her colleagues will present for the first time at the upcomingconference of the International Society for the Empirical Study of Literature and Media, in Torino, Italy, Mangen is finding that that may indeed be the case. [Read More...]

Don’t Fight the Road

At In Earnest, Jane Clark writes about discovering, on a road trip through Southern California, that it’s actually more fun to drive the speed limit . . . and considers why: This is counter-intuitive on every level. First of all, the speed limit is the rule, and following rules usually seems less fun than bending or breaking [Read More...]

Many Hopes

There’s an interview over at Darling with Alice Kinyua, founder of the organization “Many Hopes,” which invests in the generation of children who can defeat extreme poverty in Kenya: Before working for Many Hopes (which is known as MUdzini Kwetu in Kenya) I was previously working in a commercial law firm. One day, a friend told me about [Read More...]


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