What Do You Think About an e-Passover?

Reflecting on Technology

I read a fascinating piece in the New York Times this morning: A Question for Seder: What Role for Screens? by Jennifer Medina. This raises all sorts of questions about the use of technology in the exercise of faith. Here’s the set up: For many Jewish families, this Passover night will indeed be different from [Read More...]

A Week of Holy

For Western Christians (even those from not-very-liturgical traditions), this week is Holy Week, in which we remember the days that led up to Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection. Over at The High Calling, they ran a series of posts on observing Holy Week. Laura Boggess reflects on at “a week of holy”: A week of little [Read More...]

Walking: America’s Favorite Spectator Sport

In odd Friday news – did you know that a popular competitive sport in the 1870s and 80s was . . . walking? NPR has more: “In the decades after the Civil War there was mass urbanization in the United States [with] millions of people moving into the cities,” Algeo tells NPR’s Robert Siegel. “And [Read More...]

Reflecting on Passion – Posthumously

In the New York Times last weekend, Nicholas Kristof – looking ahead to graduation season – wrote about a book written by Mary Keegan, an emerging writer who died tragically two years ago that prods the reader to think about their life direction: Keegan recalled being paid $100 to attend a recruiting session at Yale by [Read More...]

Moving Beyond Mediocrity: It’s Hard Work!

I’ve reflected a bit lately on how we often assume that if something is difficult, we’re doing it wrong and need to change course. While that’s true for some things, of course, we sometimes forget that many things are difficult because they’re worth doing – work, projects, relationships. Over at The High Calling, Charity Singleton [Read More...]

A Doubter in the Holy Land

In The New York Times, the writer and literary critic Maud Newton – who was raised in a fervently religious household and now describes her own religious views as “uncertain” – writes about visiting the Holy Land: When I was young, my mother had a feverish conversion and started a church in our living room. I’d [Read More...]

A Seamless Calling

Over at the InterVarsity website “The Well,” my Christianity Today colleague Katelyn Beaty wrote a lovely profile of Dr. Karen Swallow Prior, of Liberty University, and her “seamless vocation”: Now, I’m getting to see Karen — who is spending this break finishing a biography of social reformer and abolitionist Hannah More — in her daily [Read More...]

A Thread Called Grace

My friend Jon Merritt is a brave, wise writer, and everyone should read the excerpt from his new book that appears in April’s Christianity Today : I can’t tell you how many times something like this occurred. I remember those three vividly, and when I let my mind wander, I can still see the events in my [Read More...]

Lenten Reflections on the Apostle’s Creed

Every week in church, we recite the Apostle’s Creed. I didn’t grow up doing this, so it took me a while to memorize it, and I find it to be very meaningful every week. So I found this meditation especially meaningful, in which the author thinks through each phrase of the creed. If you’re not [Read More...]

Creativity and Minecraft

Here’s an interesting piece: the case for creating — and video games: Things progressed. Servers popped up where players could work together in a world. Some players replicated real-world buildings and spaces. Conferences were held. People started to wonder about applications outside of video games: education? design? urban planning? Mojang, the maker of Minecraft, is now [Read More...]

A Year of Grieving Dangerously

Over at Christianity Today, an absolutely compelling interview with Kay Warren (Rick Warren’s wife) about their year of “grieving dangerously” after their son Matthew’s tragic suicide last year: I said at Matthew’s memorial service, “We’re devastated, but not destroyed.” I don’t know that you ever stop being devastated by catastrophic loss. In the last year-and-a-half of [Read More...]

The First Baseball

I spent a couple hours this weekend first compiling and then keeping an eye on my fantasy baseball draft. I’m in a league with six of my colleagues and seven of our students. It’s the first year I’ve played, but I grew up watching the Red Sox (my Dad was born and raised in south [Read More...]

Sports for the Glory of God

March Madness is upon us, and with it, all things basketball are important once again. The High Calling has this interview about “sports for the glory of God” with Pastor Stephen Chen, who serves as a pastor to, among others, NBA star Jeremy Lin: Intelligent, high achieving people can be good because they want to [Read More...]

The Importance of Family Farming

The Curator (which has a new look!) published an interesting little piece on the trend toward transparency in food systems and the importance of a very old institution: We should be encouraged to note that a people-based food system isn’t just a trend; it’s the model by which most of the world’s food is grown. Family [Read More...]

The Pointlessness of Unplugging

We often talk about the importance of stepping away from our screens and iDevices in order to “unplug.” Going cold turkey, we feel, will help us decrease our dependence on our devices. But Casey N. Cep had a fascinating piece over at the New Yorker‘s culture blog about “the pointlessness of unplugging”: Unplugging from devices [Read More...]

Running as Therapy

I started running about a year and a half ago, more or less seriously (with some weather-induced breaks), and a little over a week ago I ran the New York City Half Marathon, my fifth race at that distance. It was very cold, and the course was challenging, and my time wasn’t quite as good [Read More...]


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