Practical Ideas for Church Leaders Encouraging Vocational Faithfulness

There’s a lot of talk about vocation these days. The church is waking up to the need to equip parishioners not just on Sundays, but throughout the week. But how can church leaders do this? That’s an ongoing discussion over at The High Calling, and Amy Sherman offers some very practical ideas: It’s critical for [Read More...]

Fair Trade . . . Sports?

The Superbowl is over, but sports keep going forever. And Zach Smith published an interesting piece over at QIdeas about “fair trade sports”: There has been tension in the relationship between sports and the Church for about as long as the Church can claim a formal existence. The early fathers of the Church were no [Read More...]

Documentaries and St. Augustine

I don’t watch a lot of documentaries, but there were quite a few good ones released in 2013. Over at Christianity Today, Asher Gelzer-Govatos made the surprising connection between those docs and St. Augustine: Plenty of good documentaries are made in this style: it dominates the genre. But 2013 yielded a number of documentaries which push [Read More...]

Some Thoughts on Philip Seymour Hoffman

The actor Philip Seymour Hoffman died this weekend of an apparent drug overdose – a tragedy, for anyone who saw any of his performances (I can’t list them all off, but some of his more spiritually-themed films included Magnolia and Doubt, and he most recently was in the second Hunger Games film as Plutarch Heavensbee). He may [Read More...]

The Allure of the Map

I remember that the copy of Winnie-the-Pooh I used to check out of the library when I was a child had maps in the front and back of the book, and I used to pore over them, intrigued by the placement of the Hundred Acre Wood among all the other locations. My brother was similarly fascinated by [Read More...]

Beating the Digital Overwhelm Epidemic

We’re all worried about being digitally overwhelmed. Over at Q Ideas, Claire Diaz-Ortiz (who helped found Twitter) was thinking about how Christians can beat that digital overwhelm epidemic: What can you do? How can you reap the best of technology’s blessings without suffering the worst of its curses? Is it even possible to find peace, [Read More...]

Don’t Let Your Need for Approval Get In the Way

A lot of things can hold us back in our work – something they were exploring at The High Calling last week. But this one seemed especially interesting: “how your need for approval can hold you back in your work.” You’re 25. And when you’re applying for a promotion as a columnist in the metro [Read More...]

‘Gimme Shelter’

On Monday, Ken Morefield reviewed the new film Gimme Shelter for Christianity Today. It’s a film with a strong pro-life message that also has good performances. He made a good point about this in his review: In his introduction to George MacDonald: An Anthology, C. S. Lewis wrote, “There are indeed, passages, many of them in this collection, where the [Read More...]

A New Year’s Prayer

We still get to talk about the New Year until the end of January, right? Okay, good. In Art House America, Jessica Brown wrote about a prayer for the new year: Twelve years ago in the little gift shop of St. Mary’s church in Oxford, I found a tray of laminated prayer cards. Assuming “An [Read More...]

The Imagination Wars

Businesspeople, creatives, theologians, and others have long said that our imaginations are vitally important to showing us why, and how, we do the things we do. But what vision animates your imagination? For more on this, you can watch a short talk from Gabe Lyons of Q which asks an important question: what vision of [Read More...]

The Best Punctuation Marks

It may seem frivolous, I suppose, but thinking about punctuation is one of those things that writers and teachers love to do. I spent a half hour in an upper-level college writing class recently explaining what difference it makes to a reader whether you use a comma, a colon, a semicolon, a dash, or some [Read More...]

Wearable Technology: Darth Vader or Dick Tracy?

The whole issue of “wearable technology” has been around a long time, but it’s starting to become a hot topic with advancements like Google Glass and Fitbit. So over at The High Calling, Marcus Goodyear is asking, “Does it matter if people see technology before they see each other?” Forget about the big TVs. The [Read More...]

Joni Eareckson Tada at the Oscars?

The Oscar nominations came out late last week, and there were plenty of reactions all over the internet from movie lovers, critics, and more. But in a move that surprised nearly everyone, the Academy nominated a song from the movie Alone Yet Not Alone for Best Original Song. The shocker for many was that the film—which didn’t [Read More...]

The Geography of Memory

I had the privilege of hearing Jeanne Murray Walker read several times from her memoir-in-progress, The Geography of Memory, while I was a graduate student in the M.F.A. program at Seattle Pacific University (in which Walker is one of the poetry mentors). The book examines both family history and personal memory alongside the story of Walker’s [Read More...]

Why Millennials Long for Liturgy

An interesting take on the millennial generation’s burgeoning interest in liturgical workshop over at The American Conservative: Yet all three say the high church has presented them with a sense of community they would not have experienced otherwise. For Gingerich, the seasons of feasting and fasting taught him to suffer and celebrate with the church [Read More...]

What The Internet Can’t Do

Over at Image’s Good Letters blog, Stuart Scadron-Wattles is reflecting on the value of curation in our info-saturated world: In other words, I get to read what I already have read. Amazon gets to sell me something, and—assuming I repeatedly click the right button, my reading life begins to resemble life in these American suburbs: safe, [Read More...]


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