The Seven Last Words of Christ: Reflections for Holy Week




The Seven Last Words of Christ

Reflections for Holy Week


Rev. Dr. Mark D. Roberts


Note: You may download this resource at no cost, for personal use or for use in a Christian ministry, as long as you are not publishing it for sale. All I ask is that you acknowledge the source of this material: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/markdroberts/. For all other uses, please contact me at markblog@markdroberts.com. Thank you.




You may also be interested in:


The Stations of the Cross: A Devotional Guide for Lent and Holy Week

Why Did Jesus Have to Die?

 


Daily inspiration for your life and work . . .

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Life for Leaders is a daily, digital devotional that is sent out each morning from the Max De Pree Center for Leadership, where Mark works. This devotional, written by Mark and his team, will help you make connections between God, Scripture, and your daily work. You can check it out and/or subscribe here. There is no cost. Your email address will be used only for Life for Leaders. You can unsubscribe easily at any time.


 




The First Word:
“Father, forgive them, for they don’t know what they’re doing.”
(Luke 23:34)

Copyright © 2007, Linda E. S. Roberts. For permission to use this picture, please contact Mark.

Reflection

It makes sense that the first word of Jesus from the cross is a word of forgiveness. That’s the point of the cross, after all. Jesus is dying so that we might be forgiven for our sins, so that we might be reconciled to God for eternity.

But the forgiveness of God through Christ doesn’t come only to those who don’t know what they are doing when they sin. In the mercy of God, we receive his forgiveness even when we do what we know to be wrong. God chooses to wipe away our sins, not because we have some convenient excuse, and not because we have tried hard to make up for them, but because he is a God of amazing grace, with mercies that are new every morning.

As we read the words, “Father, forgive them,” may we understand that we too are forgiven through Christ. As John writes in his first letter, “But if we confess our sins to him, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all wickedness” (1 John 1:9). Because Christ died on the cross for us, we are cleansed from all wickedness, from every last sin. We are united with God the Father as his beloved children. We are free to approach his throne of grace with our needs and concerns. God “has removed our sins as far from us as the east is from the west” (Ps 103:13). What great news!

Questions for Reflection

Do you really believe God has forgiven your sins? Do you take time on a regular basis to confess your sins so that you might enjoy the freedom of forgiveness? Do you need to experience God’s forgiveness in a fresh way today?

Prayer

Gracious Lord Jesus, it’s easy for me to speak of your forgiveness, even to ask for it and to thank you for it. But do I really believe I’m forgiven? Do I experience the freedom that comes from the assurance that you have cleansed me from my sins? Or do I live as if I’m “semi-forgiven”? Even though I’ve put my faith in you and confessed my sins, do I live as sin still has power over me? Do I try to prove myself to you, as if I might be able to earn more forgiveness?

Dear Lord, though I believe at one level that you have forgiven me, this amazing truth needs to penetrate my heart in new ways. Help me to know with fresh conviction that I am fully and finally forgiven, not because of anything I have done, but because of what you have done for me.

May I live today as a forgiven person, opening my heart to you, choosing not to sin because the power of sin has been broken by your salvation.

All praise be to you, Lord Jesus, for your matchless forgiveness! Amen.


The Second Word:
“I assure you, today you will be with me in paradise.”
(Luke 23:43)

 

 

 

 

Reflection

As Jesus hung on the cross, he was mocked by the leaders and the soldiers. One of the criminals being crucified with him added his own measure of scorn. But the other crucified criminal sensed that Jesus was being treated unjustly. After speaking up for Jesus, he cried out, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom” (v. 42).

Jesus responded to this criminal, “I assure you, today you will be with me in paradise” (v. 43). The word paradise, from the Greek word paradeisos, which meant “garden,” was used in the Greek Old Testament as a word for the Garden of Eden. In Judaism of the time of Jesus it was associated with heaven, and also with the future when God would restore all things to the perfection of the Garden. Paradise was sometimes thought to be the place where righteous people went after death. This seems to be the way Jesus uses paradise in this passage.

Thus we have encountered one of the most astounding and encouraging verses in all of Scripture. Jesus promised that the criminal would be with him in paradise. Yet the text of Luke gives us no reason to believe this man had been a follower of Jesus, or even a believer in him in any well-developed sense. He might have felt sorry for his sins, but he did not obviously repent. Rather, the criminal’s cry to be remembered seems more like a desperate, last-gasp effort.

Though we should make every effort to have right theology, and though we should live our lives each day as disciples of Jesus, in the end, our relationship with him comes down to simple trust. “Jesus, remember me,” we cry. And Jesus, embodying the mercy of God, says to us, “You will be with me in paradise.” We are welcome there not because we have right theology, and not because we are living rightly, but because God is merciful and we have put our trust in Jesus.

Questions for Reflection

Have you staked your life on Jesus? Have you put your ultimate trust in him? Do you know that, when your time comes, you will be with him in paradise?

Prayer

Dear Lord Jesus, how I wonder at your grace and mercy! When we cry out to you, you hear us. When we ask you to remember us when you come into your kingdom, you offer the promise of paradise. Your mercy, dear Lord, exceeds anything we might imagine. It embraces us, encourages us, heals us.

O Lord, though my situation is so different from the criminal who cried out to you, I am nevertheless quite like him. Today I live, trusting you and you alone. My life, but now and in the world to come, is in your hands. And so I pray:

Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom! Jesus, remember me today as I seek to live within your kingdom! Amen.


The Third Word:
“Dear woman, here is your son.”
(John 19:26)

 

Reflection

As Jesus was dying, his mother was among those who had remained with him. Most of the male disciples had fled, with the exception of one whom the Fourth Gospel calls “the disciple he loved.” We can’t be exactly sure of the identity of this beloved disciple, though many interpreters believe he is John, who is also the one behind the writing of this Gospel.

No matter who the beloved disciple was, it’s clear that Jesus was forging a relationship between this disciple and his mother, one in which the disciple would take care of Mary financially and in other ways. Jesus wanted to make sure she would be in good hands after his death.

The presence of Mary at the cross adds both humanity and horror to the scene. We are reminded that Jesus was a real human being, a man who had once been a boy who had once been carried in the womb of his mother. Even as he was dying on the cross as the Savior of the world, Jesus was also a son, a role he didn’t neglect in his last moments.

When we think of the crucifixion of Jesus from the perspective of his mother, our horror increases dramatically. The death of a child is one of the most painful of all parental experiences. To watch one’s beloved child experience the extreme torture of crucifixion must have been unimaginably terrible. We’re reminded of the prophecy of Simeon shortly after Jesus’ birth, when he said to Mary: “And a sword will pierce your very soul” (Luke 2:35).

This scene helps us not to glorify or spiritualize the crucifixion of Jesus. He was a real man, true flesh and blood, a son of a mother, dying with unbearable agony. His suffering was altogether real, and he took it on for you and for me.

Questions for Reflection

What does Mary’s presence at the cross evoke in you? Why do you think was it necessary for Jesus to suffer physical pain as he died?

Prayer

Lord Jesus, the presence of your mother at the cross engages my heart. You are no longer only the Savior dying for the sins of the world. You are also a fully human man, a son with a mother.

O Lord, how can I begin to thank you for what you suffered? My words fall short. My thoughts seem superficial and vague. Nevertheless, I offer my sincere gratitude for your suffering. Thank you for bearing my sin on the cross. I give you my praise, my love, my heart . . . all that I am, because you have given me all that you are.

All praise be to you, Lord Jesus, fully God and fully human, Savior of the world . . . my Savior! Amen.


The Fourth Word:
“My God, my God, why have you abandoned me?”
(Mark 15:34)

Reflection

As Jesus was dying on the cross, he echoed the beginning of Psalm 22, which reads:

My God, my God, why have you abandoned me?
Why are you so far away when I groan for help?
Every day I call to you, my God, but you do not answer.
Every night you hear my voice, but I find no relief. (vv. 1-2)

In the words of the psalmist Jesus found a way to express the cry of his heart: Why had God abandoned him? Why did his Father turn his back on Jesus in his moment of greatest agony?

This side of heaven, we will never fully know what Jesus was experiencing in this moment. Was he asking this question because, in the mystery of his incarnational suffering, he didn’t know why God had abandoned him? Or was his cry not so much a question as an expression of profound agony? Or was it both?

What we do know is that Jesus entered into the Hell of separation from God. The Father abandoned him because Jesus took upon himself the penalty for our sins. In that excruciating moment, he experienced something far more horrible than physical pain. The beloved Son of God knew what it was like to be rejected by the Father. As we read in 2 Corinthians 5:21, “God made him who had no sin to be sin for us, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God” (NIV).

I can write these words. I can say, truly, that the Father abandoned the Son for our sake, for the salvation of the world. But can I really grasp the mystery and the majesty of this truth? Hardly. As Martin Luther once said, “God forsaking God. Who can understand it?” Yet even my miniscule grasp of this reality calls me to confession, to humility, to worship, to adoration.

Questions for Reflection

Have you taken time to consider that Jesus was abandoned by the Father so that you might not be? What does this “word” from the cross mean to you?

Prayer

O Lord Jesus, though I will never fully grasp the wonder and horror of your abandonment by the Father, every time I read this “word,” I am overwhelmed with gratitude. How can I ever thank you for what you suffered for me? What can I do but to offer myself to you in gratitude and praise? Thank you, dear Lord, for what you suffered. Thank you for taking my place. Thank you for being forsaken by the Father so that I might never be.

When I survey the wondrous cross,
On which the Prince of glory died,
My richest gain I count but loss,
And pour contempt on all my pride.

Forbid it, Lord, that I should boast,
Save in the death of Christ my God;
All the vain things that charm me most,
I sacrifice them to his blood.

See, from his head, his hands, his feet,
Sorrow and love flow mingled down;
Did e’er such love and sorrow meet,
Or thorns compose so rich a crown.

Were the whole realm of nature mine,
That were a present far too small;
Love so amazing, so divine,
Demands my soul, my life, my all.

“When I Survey the Wondrous Cross” by Isaac Watts (1707)


The Fifth Word:
“I am thirsty.”
(John 19:28)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reflection

No doubt Jesus experienced extreme thirst while being crucified. He would have lost a substantial quantity of bodily fluid, both blood and sweat, through what he had endured even prior to crucifixion. Thus his statement, “I am thirsty” was, on the most obvious level, a request for something to drink. In response the soldiers gave Jesus “sour wine” (v. 29), a cheap beverage common among lower class people in the time of Jesus.

John notes that Jesus said “I am thirsty,” not only as a statement of physical reality, but also in order to fulfill the Scripture. Though there is no specific reference in the text of the Gospel, it’s likely that John was thinking of Psalm 69, which includes this passage:

Their insults have broken my heart,
and I am in despair.
If only one person would show some pity;
if only one would turn and comfort me.
But instead, they give me poison for food;
they offer me sour wine for my thirst.
(vv. 20-21)

As he suffered, Jesus embodied the pain of the people of Israel, that which had been captured in the Psalms. Jesus was suffering for the sin of Israel, even as he was taking upon himself the sin of the world.

As I reflect on Jesus’ statement, “I am thirsty,” I keep thinking of my own thirst. It’s nothing like that of Jesus. Rather, I am thirsty for him. My soul yearns for the living water that Jesus supplies (John 4:10; 7:38-39). I rejoice in the fact that he suffered physical thirst on the cross – and so much more – so that my thirst for the water of life might be quenched.

Questions for Reflection

How do you respond to Jesus’ statement “I am thirsty”? What does this statement suggest to you about Jesus? About yourself?

Prayer

O Lord, once again I thank you for what you suffered on the cross. Besides extraordinary pain, you also experienced extreme thirst. All of this was part and parcel of your taking on our humanity so that you might take away our sin.

Dear Lord, in your words “I am thirsty” I hear the cry of my own heart. I too am thirsty, Lord, not for physical drink. I don’t need sour wine. Rather, I need the new wine of your kingdom to flood my soul. I need to be refreshed by your living water. I yearn for your Spirit to fill me once again.

I am thirsty, Lord, for you. Amen.


The Sixth Word:
“It is finished!”
(John 19:30)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reflection

I never saw a more difficult film to watch than Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ. For most of that movie I wanted to avert my eyes. It was horrible to watch even a cinematic version of a crucifixion. And it was beyond comprehension to think that this actually happened to somebody, and not just anybody, but my Lord and Savior. I had studied the crucifixion before, and knew in my head what Jesus experienced. But seeing a visual presentation of his suffering was almost more than I could bear. When The Passion of the Christ was over, I felt palpable relief. Thank goodness it was finished.

When Jesus said “It is finished,” surely he was expressing relief that his suffering was over. “It is finished” meant, in part, “This is finally done!” But the Greek verb translated as “It is finished” (tetelestai) means more than just this. Eugene Peterson captures the full sense of the verb in The Message: “It’s done . . . complete.” Jesus had accomplished his mission. He had announced and inaugurated the kingdom of God. He had revealed the love and grace of God. And he had embodied that love and grace by dying for the sin of the world, thus opening up the way for all to live under the reign of God.

Because Jesus finished his work of salvation, you and I don’t need to add to it. In fact, we can’t. He accomplished what we never could, taking our sin upon himself and giving us his life in return. Jesus finished that for which he had been sent, and we are the beneficiaries of his unique effort. Because of what he finished, you and I are never “finished.” We have hope for this life and for the next. We know that nothing can separate us from God’s love. One day what God has begun in us will also be finished, by his grace. Until that day, we live in the confidence of Jesus’ cry of victory: “It is finished!”

Questions for Reflection

Do you live as if Jesus finished the work of salvation? To you have confidence that God will finish that which he has begun in you?

Prayer

How can I ever find words to express my gratitude to you, dear Lord Jesus? You did it. You finished that for which you had been sent, faithful in life, faithful in death. You accomplished that which no other person could do, taking the sin of the world upon your sinless shoulders . . . taking my sin so that I might receive your forgiveness and new life.

All praise be to you, gracious Lord, for finishing the work of salvation. All praise be to you, dear Jesus, for saving me! Alleluia! Amen.


The Seventh Word:
“Father, I entrust my spirit into your hands!”
(Luke 23:46)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reflection

Two of the last seven “words” of Jesus were quotations from the Psalms. Earlier Jesus had Psalm 22, “My God, my God, why have you abandoned me?” to express his anguish. Later he borrowed from Psalm 31, which comes to us from Luke as “Father, I entrust my spirit into your hands.”

On an obvious level, Jesus was putting his post mortem future in the hands of his Heavenly Father. It was as if he was saying, “Whatever happens to me after I die is your responsibility, Father.”

But when we look carefully at the Psalm Jesus quoted, we see more than what at first meets our eyes. Psalm 31 begins with a cry for divine help:

O LORD, I have come to you for protection;
don’t let me be disgraced.
Save me, for you do what is right. (v. 1)

But then it mixes asking for God’s deliverance with a confession of God’s strength and faithfulness:

I entrust my spirit into your hand.
Rescue me, LORD, for you are a faithful God. (v. 5)

By the end, Psalm 31 offers praise of God’s salvation:

Praise the LORD,
for he has shown me the wonders of his unfailing love.
He kept me safe when my city was under attack. (v. 21)

By quoting a portion of Psalm 31, therefore, Jesus not only entrusted his future to his Father, but also implied that he would be delivered and exonerated. No, God would not deliver him from death by crucifixion. But beyond this horrific death lay something marvelous. “I entrust my spirit into your hands” points back to the familiar suffering of David in Psalm 31, and forward to the resurrection.

Questions for Reflection

Have you put your life and, indeed, your life beyond this life, in God’s hands? How do you experience God’s salvation through Christ in your life today?

Prayer

Gracious Lord, even as you once entrusted your spirit into the hands of the Father, so I give my life to you. I trust you, and you alone to be my Savior. I submit to your sovereignty over my life, and seek to live for your glory alone. Here I am, Lord, available to you, both now and in the future.

How good it is to know, dear Lord, that the cross was not the end for you. As you entrusted your spirit into the Father’s hands, you did so in anticipation of what was to come. So we reflect upon your death, not in despair, but in hope. With Good Friday behind us, Easter Sunday is on the horizon. Amen.

 

You may also be interested in:


The Stations of the Cross: A Devotional Guide for Lent and Holy Week


Life for Leaders: Daily Devotions by Mark D. Roberts

  • Nikki

    Thank you for sharing and I love the artwork!!

  • Anonymous

    Thanks for your comment.

  • james patrick mercado

    thanks!!!

  • Anonymous

    You’re welcome.

  • Donald_chambers

    Dr. Roberts, I love your work and it is easy to understand. Is there anyway I can get a copy of the Seven Last Words. I tried to print it but to no avail. I wanted to use parts of it when we have the presentation of the Seven Last Words at my church. My name is Donald Chambers and I attend St. Luke’s United Methodist Church where I am a Lay Speaker.
     

  • Anonymous

    Thanks. The best way to get a copy is to copy the text into a word processor. You’ll have to play around with the formatting and pictures. I did this and it works. It takes about five minutes to get it ready to print.

  • Rev. Luis A. Figueroa, D.D.

    Dr.Roberts, I do believe you have truly expressed the “Seven Last Words” of our Savior at a very understandable stage. I do hope that many would read and truly seek the Lord for ALL He has done for humanity. May the Almighty continue to guide and bless you with your works. God Bless.

  • Anonymous

    Thank you.

  • Lucerolopez1942

    bROTHER Robert, thank you so much for you interpretetion of the seven last words of Jesus, will pass tjis to my group when my turn come to teach them.Blessings and hope to see more from you in this pag.

  • Anonymous

    Thank you and you’re welcome.

  • Gratefulreader

    Thank you for the blessing of this meditation on the last seven words of Jesus!!!
    The prayers are especially wonderful in putting into words what the heart is longing…
    May you be blessed in turn in every need of your life.

  • Anonymous

    Thank you.

  • CAUTRY

    THINK THIS IS TRIMIDOIUSLY GREEAT

  • Anonymous

    Thanks very much.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100003004994239 Clint Ouis Cabello

    thanks for the 7 words of JESUS CHRIST <3

  • Anonymous

    You’re welcome.

  • Armina magtibay

    Many times i’ve heard of these 7 Last Words of Jesus Christ especially during lenten season, but by reading this it brought me into a deeper gratitude of what Jesus had done for my salvation. Thank God for your life for this wonderful teaching.

  • Anonymous

    Wonderful. Thank you for this comment.

  • Lanielou75

    praise you JESUS!  Thank you for your sacrifice. 

  • Gusetme

     It was nice “bd”

  • jumalyn

    sooo..nice prayer:)

  • Anonymous

    Thank you.

  • Hope Marie Lourdes G. Salas

    thanks for your write-up i was able to get some information on the seven last words of Christ……… i have now something to share……. thanks a lot…. ^_^

  • Anonymous

    You’re welcome.

  • Rev. Richard Sudlik OMI

    thank you for this gift for Holy Week
    Rev. Richard Sudlik OMI

  • Anonymous

    You’re welcome.

  • danny r.

    You have given me a deeper understanding of the seven last words of our Lord. I am particularly moved by the 3rd and 4th words. They showed God’s immeasurable love for us by letting his Son suffer (aside from physical pain)  the two most painful  emotional experiences imaginable  in exchange for our salvation, namely:the agony  of  seeing his mother in great distress and pain at the imminent death of her child  (as you said “the most painful of all parental experiences”) and the feeling of being rejected by his own father.  

    Your write-up has been so enlightening. Thank you very much. 

  • Wonderful

    thanks for the seven last words of Jesus. it gave me new understanding about how he suffered for our salvation

  • p brown

    Wonderful -Wonderful = Thanks for the seven words .  I KNOW HE LIVES.

  • Anonymous

    Thank you. Amen.

  • JESSYELLS

    It thrills my  heart the  know  that God  would love  mankind so much to sacifice  his  son  on  the  cross;   It;s  so uplifting  to  know  that  our sins  have  been  nailed to  the  cross ,  Christ  suffered  so  we  would not have to; And  now  we  can  come  boldly  to  the  throne  of  grace to find  help in  the  time  of  need.  The last  seven  words  of  Jesus  on  the  cross was    made  so  plain,  that you  can  ubderstand why he made those  last Quotations ;  Thanks  again; 

  • Anonymous

    You’re welcome.

  • Diba Madolo

    Can I preach from your notes this Good Friday?

  • Anonymous

    Absolutely. Whatever is helpful to you.

  • Anonymous

    Thank you, Mark, for your reflection on the seven last words of Christ.  Thank you, Linda, for sharing your talent and paintings with all of us.

    I am having a problem reading the first word.  It seems as though there is a white box on the first paragraph that is blocking out a good deal of the text.  Is that something on the patheos site or is it my computer.

    Thanks for your help on this.

    Blessings to you and the work that you are doing. 

  • Anonymous

    So sorry. I’ve never heard about this from anyone else, or seen it myself. Did you try dumping your cache? That might help.

  • Vivianwtownsend

    am having that same problem with the white box

  • Brian.

    so am i

  • Ptr. Remy

    Thanx for the short but deep insights on the last words of Jesus…I’m gonna assign my deacons to give meditations on it, hope this will help them do it!

  • Khalidemmanuel777

    Thank you so much Mark D Robert for sharing wonderful words of Jesus Christ. i was looks the last seven words with illustrations. you made my desire fulfilled. may God Bless you.

  • Marivic

    thanks for the inspiration and great reflection.

  • Anonymous

    You’re welcome.

  • Brian.

    wel done, but i was always thought the last words of christ were .. it is finished.

  • Anonymous

    Yes, that’s the last “word” in John. Luke ends with a different saying. We really cannot know which came last. Both were right at the end of Jesus’ life.

  • bro.manuel

    thnks for encouraging msg.GOD BLESS

  • Anonymous

    You’re welcome.

  • cecille

    Thank you for sharing.

  • http://1minutedailyword.com/ Steve Martin

    That was a terrific piece, Pastor Roberts!

    I appreciate all your efforts and the insights and Word you have underscored for us.

    God bless you!

  • Anonymous

    Thanks very much!

  • Pastor Zaldy

    Thank you Dr. Roberts for your insightful and profound reflection of the last statements of Jesus on the Cross. I’d like to ask for your permission to use some of your thoughts during our Good Friday reflection of the same, with proper quotations, of course, from your work. 

  • Anonymous

    Absolutely. Thanks for asking.

  • Pkkurian

    Dear Rev Mark Roberts – this is a superb piece of document on the 7 words from the Cross.  Can I use this document as a reference for reflection at our Church on Good Friday?

  • Anonymous

    Yes, indeed. Thanks.

  • http://twitter.com/Michael_Espina Michael Espina

    Dr. Roberts, I was assigned by our Church to speak on the seventh words of Christ. A very insightful writing indeed of yours. Please allow me to use this material in my short exhortations on the 7’th word. Thanks and God bless you!

  • Anonymous

    Yes, indeed. You are most welcome to whatever is helpful to you.

  • Jonathanrebullar

    Greetings in the Name of Christ!
    Thanks for the Seven Words. This will be very useful for my neighbor who was assigned by the Catholic Church to speak and share about the reflection. I really appreciate this for the needs of our sister in Christ.      

  • Anonymous

    Great. Thanks for your comment.

  • Anonymous

    Thank you, Dr. Roberts, for this meditation on the 7 Last Words of Christ.  I am having problems viewing the first two paragraphs as they seem to be partially blocked out.  Is it possible for you to send me those first two paragraphs of the first word so that I can read them completely?  Thank you very much.

  • Anonymous

    That seems to happen to some people. A strange browser and website issue. Here are the paragraphs:

    It makes sense that the first word of Jesus from the cross is a word of forgiveness. That’s the point of the cross, after all. Jesus is dying so that we might be forgiven for our sins, so that we might be reconciled to God for eternity.

    But the forgiveness of God through Christ doesn’t come only to those who don’t know what they are doing when they sin. In the mercy of God, we receive his forgiveness even when we do what we know to be wrong. God chooses to wipe away our sins, not because we have some convenient excuse, and not because we have tried hard to make up for them, but because he is a God of amazing grace, with mercies that are new every morning.

    As we read the words, “Father, forgive them,” may we understand that we too are forgiven through Christ. As John writes in his first letter, “But if we confess our sins to him, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all wickedness” (1 John 1:9). Because Christ died on the cross for us, we are cleansed from all wickedness, from every last sin. We are united with God the Father as his beloved children. We are free to approach his throne of grace with our needs and concerns. God “has removed our sins as far from us as the east is from the west” (Ps 103:13). What great news!

  • Teodoro_cesar

    Will share it to others and acknowledging you as the author, THanks a lot

  • Anonymous

    You’re welcome.

  • Samson Borde

    I am from India, and searching through the Google, I found your reflections on the 7 last words of Christ very interesting.Going through some of the comments, every other person seems to be preparing for or on this reflection or  wishes to share it with others. Great work! Hmmn, think I should also share the same with my Prayer Group. Sam Borde

  • Anonymous

    Thank you.

  • Maryjanenghog

    refreshing to reflect ourself with Jesus sufferings for the great love for us mankind and sinners…. thank you Jesus for saving me and saving us all I love you Jesus… Help me to remind myself in doing good as my hepl to lighten your crosses and not nailing you again and again….

  • Anonymous

    Amen. Thanks for your comment.

  • liza

    i am very touch with the guide of the 7 last words of our Lord.   I feel like a cotton my feelings so light that a sort of burden on my shoulders had departed from my system.   Thank you and May God bless you even more.     Liza

  • Anonymous

    Thanks for sharing your comment.

  • florino

    the sharing gives an interesting insight to all believers and those who are following the life of Christ… thanks for your time in doing this reflection of life…

  • Anonymous

    You’re welcome. Thanks for your comment.

  • Joyceleyson

    thank you for the wonderful reflections,that help me in my journey to know and understand the love of our dear Jesus Christ. 

  • Anonymous

    You’re welcome. Thanks for your comment.

  • Jsdany

    Thank you Lord for such a touching words. Thanks for this author who could be used to share your word to so many people even to such a far distant as me. That’s you love.

  • Anonymous

    You’re welcome. Thanks for your comment.

  • servant woods

    thank you so much you help me with my sermon

  • Anonymous

    Glad to help.

  • janno

    Thanks mark for this 7 last Word of JESUS.. this Blessing for us.

  • Anonymous

    You’re welcome.

  • Ogilvie

    A moving and challenging commentary on Our Saviour’s seven last words. He died for me and for you, Jesus my Saviour I thank you for the gift of life and for your love for  me.

  • Anonymous

    Amen. Thanks.

  • Mary Franks

    This is a great article.  Very understandable.  This inspires me to be much more sensitive to the needs of other and long to have have a caring heart like Jesus had even on the cross.  

  • Anonymous

    Amen!

  • Wintintun

    Wonderful message it reminds again and again never ending. Thanks a lot.

  • Anonymous

    You’re welcome. Thanks for your comment.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1809942731 Alejandro Magdasoc

    Truly His steadfast love for us is new every morning,,,,great is Thy faithfulness

  • Marivicarnaiz

    I’m so blessed reading this Seven Last Words of Christ, it really touches one’s Heart,may everyone who will read this will receive Jesus Christ as their Personal Savior for He died on the Cross to forgive us our sins. Praise the Lord! Amen….

  • Anonymous

    Amen, indeed.

  • Jesan45

    these words would really help us to reflect how god truly loves us, that he even offer his own life for us…may these words always dwell in our hearts and minds and guide us to do good deeds to others as what he did for us…thank you lord for saving us..we do entrust our spirits to you….love lord…

  • Anonymous

    Yes. Thanks.

  • Pisara1973

    this lent season of april 5-9, 2010 my friends and I would be going to camiguin for a “panaad” i am hoping and praying to God that I could lead my friends to  a sincere refections and meditations. 

  • Anonymous

    Thanks for your comment.

  • Arnel_roxas2768

    Praise GOD!!! Thank you Jesus for what you have done, thanks for the promise of eternal life…We love YOU………

  • Anonymous

    Amen.

  • Germanni_5566

    thank you for this i really apreciate it!! I need this for our sermon this Holy week 😀

  • Anonymous

    You’re welcome. Glad to help.