Glory, Thanks and Praise Be to God through our Lord Jesus!

Barbara Nicolosi passes on this story on the sister of one of her Act One Students:

Three shotgun pellets hit Anderson’s arm and another went through her nose — riding up the back of her cranium and hitting the back of her skull.

“Her injuries were severe, and her condition was critical…The doctors prior to surgery were concerned because so much of the brain had been traversed by the bullet,” Anderson’s pastor, Brad Strait, wrote in his blog.

Strait, who was in the hospital during the young woman’s surgery, added that doctors were worried that Anderson’s injuries could impair her speech, motor and cognitive abilities.

But incredibly, during the five-hour surgery, doctors soon found that Anderson’s brain sustained very little damage and the bullet was removed cleanly.

According to Strait, Anderson was saved by a miracle birth “defect” that no one could have anticipated.

The doctor explains that Petra’s brain has had from birth a small “defect” in it. It is a tiny channel of fluid running through her skull…Only a CAT scan would catch it, and Petra would have never noticed it.

But in Petra’s case, the shotgun buck shot…enters her brain from the exact point of this defect. Like a marble through a small tube, the defect channels the bullet from Petra’s nose through her brain. It turns slightly several times, and comes to rest at the rear of her brain. And in the process, the bullet misses all the vital areas of the brain.

Though still in the hospital, Anderson — who has already started to speak and walk again — is expected to make a full recovery.

Praise God through our Lord Jesus!

  • http://www.SwanseaAcupuncture.net Dr. Eric

    God can turn “defects” into advantages.

  • http://www.rosariesforlife.com Dave

    Why, it’s almost as if the “defect” was put there in the first place for a reason!

  • MumbleMumble

    And the other twelve people who died?

    • Mark Shea

      …are in the hands of God as well. You do realize, don’t you, that this woman and all the rest of us are going to die sooner or later? Lazarus eventually died too. That doesn’t mean that we should not marvel that he was raised from the dead. Nor does it mean that his rescusitation is diminished by the fact that others who died that day were not raised. Rather, his raising gives us hope for those who were not raised. The Chosen are always chosen for the sake of the unchosen.

      One of the marks of atheism is its absolute insistence on smashing gratitude and emphasizing despair. It is, like all haughtiness, a false “realism” dressing a real hatred of hope and consolation and seeking to crush the hearts of those wounded by such tragedy. It *wants* there to be maximum darkness and doesn’t care if it drives to suicide those harmed by such horrors. It is in league with the shooter’s hatred of life. That is but one of the reasons it is evil–and cowardly.

  • MumbleMumble

    I do realize that. So I am left wondering where the miracle is. I think that it is wonderful that this person survived a terrible ordeal, but I do not see the hand of God in it.
    And I think you are absolutely ridiculous for comparing my opinion that there is no god to the actions of a psychopathic killer. How dare you? I believe in the sanctity of life, the preciousness and fragility of mortality. Your miserable inability to either accept or understand that stands in stark contrast to your proposed divinity.

    • Mark Shea

      Be honest. You aren’t “wondering” anything. You are cocksure that there can be no miracle anywhere, ever. And so, you are here to crush any joy at this particular manifestation of hope. And yes, you are are talking like an enemy of life when you do that. You are using the dead as human shields for your dedication to a philosophy of despair which is what atheism always is, in the end.

      • Mark Shea

        I should, however, hasten to add that though you are an atheist, you are not atheism. You are better and greater than atheism. Your moralism shows that. My hope is that you will extricate yourself from this cramped ideology. You are far bigger than it. Don’t get played.

        • MumbleMumble

          Or perhaps my moralism shows you don’t quite understand atheism as well as you think you do.

          • Mark Shea

            On the contrary, I understand it better than you do. Most atheism is intensely moralistic. It is also deeply muddled, not because it is immoral, but because it cannot give an account of where it gets its morals from without stealing from supernaturalism and the Christian tradition.

          • Ted Seeber

            All I know is that your so-called moralism isn’t even honest enough to give the 10 commandments credit.

    • Ted Seeber

      Why not? Is it because you don’t see God’s hand in mutations and random quantum effects?

      This is the difference between me and a materialist- I see proof of God in absolutely *everything*.

  • MumbleMumble

    I am a humanist. My morals come from the desire to do good for humanity, and to oppose actions which damage it. Where do your morals come from?

    • Mark Shea

      My morals come, like yours, from the Judeo-Christian tradition. I did not make them. God and humanity made them and they made me–and you. The only real difference is that I think we should be polite and not plagiarize them and refuse to give credit to God as you do. Morals spring from the fact that we are creatures made in the image and likeness of God and therefore must be treated in accordance with that fact. You live (partly) in accordance with that reality. You do well in according human being dignity and should be praise for that as far as it goes. But you are an ungrateful thief in that you do not acknowledge that our dignity comes from the God who made us. Sooner or later, you will have to either choose to root our dignity in God (and therefore humble yourself before him) or (like Rorty) abandon completely the notion that humans have dignity that is by nature to be respected.

      • MumbleMumble

        Why would I give credit to something I don’t believe in?

        • John in NE

          Why do you show up here? The answer’s may be related.

          • MumbleMumble

            Because I am curious as to how people think. I am perplexed by bad arguments (on all sides), and I want to know why it is people think the way that they do.

            • John in NE

              Got it. Right.

              • MumbleMumble

                I have been called an ungrateful thief, was compared to a mass murderer, and I have been told that I have an evil, cowardly philosophy of despair. Wouldn’t you stick around for that?

                • John in NE

                  It doesn’t read to me like you were being accused of all that. Look, I told you I got it. I wouldn’t stick around for that, though. If that’s the kind of thing you like to stick around for, then maybe Mark is correct.

                  • MumbleMumble

                    I was joking.
                    And I just found out that three words is apparently too short for an approved comment. Make a note.

                    • John in NE

                      The fact that you were joking was actually far more obvious than in my comment.

                      The world has both unfairness and suffering in it, and as Christians we believe that’s not incompatible with a loving God’s will.

                      The girl who survived the shooting didn’t steal life from one of the other victims. It’s just one less life the shooter took. If people want to be grateful for that, then great.

            • Ted Seeber

              No you don’t. You just want to feel smarter than everybody else, when you’re really just intellectually dishonest and a liar.

            • Mark Shea

              No argument was being made here. Simply an expression of gratitude. So why focus on it? Seriously, you should ask yourself what you really want. As far as I can tell, you either came here with the secret hope that you are wrong and that there is a reason to hope and rejoice, or because you want to smash hope and rejoicing. Like all atheists, you are a human being in the image of God, made for communion with him and seeking him (however inchoately and incoherently) while trapped in a system of thought that is fundamentally hostile to the nature of who you and all you love truly are. My hostility is directed to that thing, not to you. So I ask you: since I was not making an argument here in the original entry, then what was it you were really seeking? If it could be shown that God is real, would that be a relief or a threat to you? Why? Why not? That’s where I’d start if I were you.

        • Mark Shea

          The existence of God is not a matter of belief. Atheism is.

          • MumbleMumble

            I am not a devout atheist. I am technically an agnostic. I recognize that it is impossible to know the truth. Yes, atheism is a belief system, as is any religion, including yours. If you don’t see that, there’s nothing more to talk about.

            • Ted Seeber

              Belief systems all contain truth. But you’re right, there’s nothing more to talk about if you reject 4000 years worth of evidence to the contrary, then there is no end to your skepticism.

            • Hezekiah Garrett

              That’s sad. You don’t even know if your own mother loved you? She wa sprobably just being nice to you in order to manipulate you into acting as she wished, and laying the ground work for guilting you into caring for her when se can no longer care for herself.

              You’d be better off an Atheist than an agnostic. The Atheist is wrong. The agnostic is just paralyzed.

              • MumbleMumble

                I know, right? That wench.
                I really just figured only calling myself an agnostic was a cop-out – so, yes, a form of paralysis. But it’s still technically true. I am an agnostic/atheist (or something).

                • Hezekiah Garrett

                  Then I will pray for you. Any chance you could give me a name other than MumbleMumble? God knows who MumbleMumble is, but it just feels silly saying it.

                  Nevermind, I will offer up my indignity at calling you MumbleMumble for the sake of both our souls.

            • Mark Shea

              Um, I just said I saw it. Atheism is, indeed, a belief system, requiring a particularly robust faith, and full of various dogmas. And I would agree with you that it is not possible to know *all* truth. I would also agree that it is impossible to comprehend him who is Truth. But I emphatically deny that it is impossible to know any truth. So do you or you would not bother to argue. You believe it is possible to make some definite statements which you regard as true. I think you are wrong about the particulars of what you think true, but we agree that *something* is true and we even agree that it is possible to arrive at knowledge of it or we would not argue. Agnosticism is, at bottom, a fear of commitment, coupled with a desire to commit to the truth. The question is, which will you choose. God believes in you and sent his Son Jesus to fetch you. But you have to pony of the willingness to entertain the possibility that your intuition which lead you to argue for limited truths eventually leads to him who is the Truth. Some who claims “I don’t know” is in a particular poor position to tell somebody who does know “You can’t know.”

          • Mark

            The athieist’s argument starts breaking down from day 1 of time. As logical and rational as atheist always try to be when they express their lack of belief in God or even in intelligent design. I truly doubt that they really ever think about the origin of life in any profound way.
            Abiogenesis, is how they explain the beginning of life. A theory that has never been proven or reproduced in anyway is what they put their “faith” in. The belief that life began from inanimate objects through random chemical reactions.

            If that’s not faith. I don’t know what is?

            • Jared

              And, even if true, it would–as usual–not contradict the faith. What’s true is that God creates…we still have no idea what creation looks like. For all we know, God created made the laws of nature, created space, time, matter, and energy, then simply set the universe into motion. Maybe life did form from inorganic material, if that is how God wanted to create life.

        • Ted Seeber

          You should at least give credit to the people who do believe, that you got *ALL* your philosophy of what is good and evil from. NONE of it came from your own imagination at all.

    • Ted Seeber

      No you are NOT a humanist. True humanists care about other human beings enough to empathize with them- and thus, understand that subjective evidence is still evidence.

  • MumbleMumble

    @ Ted
    Thank you for reminding me why I dislike organized religion.

    • Mark Shea

      Organized Religion (which one?) made Ted say that and is to blame for Ted’s remarks?

      So then, can I blame All Atheism for what you say here?

      • MumbleMumble

        I’m sorry, I reacted before you had time to adequately respond to Ted’s comments. Would you care to do so now?

        • MumbleMumble

          On second thought, yes. Go ahead. You can blame atheism on me.

          • Mark Shea

            No. I proposed blaming you on all atheism, as you blamed Ted’s remark on All Organized Religion.

        • Mark Shea

          I disagree with Ted in that awareness of natural law does not come from the Ten Commandments (which are an expression of, not the source of, natural law). But since natural law comes from God and not from the fact that you are Just That Sort of Chap, that doesn’t help you much. The sensible thing to do is to say, “Thanks be to God for the natural law” and then ask what else God might have to say. The senseless thing to do is to try to come up with some explanation for natural law that is rooted purely in a nature without a Creator.

          • Ted Seeber

            I said what I said because his morality seems to go *far* beyond natural law to me. Natural law is “protect those I like” not “be kind to my enemies”.

    • Ted Seeber

      You dislike organized religion because it tells you things that are uncomfortable for you to hear? What a shallow reason to dislike anything at all!

  • Observer

    Most, if not all, dark moments as what happened on Colo. are a failure of culture (not an advacement of it.) Culture which becomes enchained to an emptiness (what is commonly referred to as nihilism) does not evoke any good (especially one of gratitude.) If a society spent its’ time on real gratitude, you would have a culture of virtue expressively come out of it. And, in particular, you would eventually lead to a culture of charity (thus encouraging a culture of life.) What has been assaulted, in today’s culture, is charity (real charity.) Charity has been attacked in the home (meaning the family), the work area, in day-to-day experiences as shopping and other interests (and outlets.)

    In a movie which depicts not a moral and virtuous uprightness, but a terrible decadence of a society brought into decay, you get a dualism between two madmen (the Joker and the Bat-man.) Nothing, at all, has even the slightest suggestion of God restoring the family. Rather, as what the story truly depicts, is a suicide of culture and society. When two men (one being the hero and the other being a crook) go back and forth in endless recurring sequels (and episodes) having no end to dualist forces of vendettas (that never cease), you have the re-curring theme of the serpent biting it’s tail. Worse, you have a strange interest and fascination with the whole story, theme, character, and plot. The worst, terrible, and sad story is a madman who got caught up into such a fancy in finding his purpose portraying a movie into real life. And sadly still, you had a movie which nothing of moral uprightness and mercy (love and justice) are even relfected nor depicted to the audience as a sign and reason for hope.

    Take a look at the whole picture, a madman used the cloak of darkness of both midnight and the theater (he used the movie as a challenge to life and liberty to people sitting there.) Like the madman called the Joker and using the night (and darkness as Bat-man), he thought out an attack which he uses everything from a boodytrap at home and real arms (as Bat-man and the Joker.) A man who used the cloak of midnight and darkness upon un-suspecting people who sat theater with families and loved ones. Nothing, what-so-ever, depicted a point of reason and sanity for both those who watched the movie nor to the madman who thought it out. In American culture, you have a sad form of expression from madness: obsession. And since our culture has made an obsession (a deep rooted fascination of the characters of Bat-man and Joker), you bear the fruit of the man and insane (and, worse, the loss of a human soul – each person who was either victimized the brutality and the perpetuator of the crime.)

    • Ted Seeber

      And to top it off, like the Joker’s unnatural green hair, he had unnatural Orange Hair!

  • Elaine S.

    You know, one does not have to be an atheist to wonder “Where was the miracle for the people who died?” It’s a question that torments many people who survive tragedies or disasters, or lose loved ones in them. But this is how I look at it: miracles are (for lack of a better word) extra-ordinary events, bonuses or extras, not something we have a “right” to expect or demand (despite what some of the more aggressive Prosperity Gospel preachers may say). God does not promise or “owe” any of us any particular amount of time on this earth; every day we receive is a gift. If someone else receives more of that gift, it does not diminish the value of what we have received, or prove that the Giver doesn’t exist.

    • Mark Shea

      Right. And it’s really possible to think that. To consider it as a real way of looking at things. The difference between you and MumbleMumble is that you make the effort to do so.


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