Cleaning and Cultural Prejudice: A Reflection on Good Practices and Toxic Theology

By Stephen Milliken Cleaning. Everybody at some point in their lives has to clean up something. But interestingly, those of us who practice this discipline the most tend to be society’s most neglected, or at least second class citizens. Gender norms place cleaning within women’s work, drudgery not fit for the magnanimous free thoughts of [Read More…]

Is the utopian workplace just a ploy to keep us all at work?

Today’s long read is from Aeon, and asks a provocative question about whether “tech campuses” and the like are really in all of our best interests. After talking about Google’s new Mountain View campus, author Benjamin Naddaff-Hafrey wonders: Such offices symbolise not just the future of work in the public mind, but also a new, utopian age [Read More…]

Refugee ministry: Can any church do this?

Not every congregation can do ministry with refugees. But every church can show up in their community and see where God is already working.  Reprinted from Faith & Leadership. By Hannah Terry When people find out about the work I do with the refugee community in the neighborhood surrounding my church, I’m often asked, “Can [Read More…]

Gratitude: An Elixir for a Time of Sadness

By Timothy Askew; reprinted from Inc. with the kind permission of Timothy Askew. Willie Nelson once said, “When I started counting my blessings, my whole life turned around.” I write a Thanksgiving column every year. I always look forward to it. Gratitude is my most welcomed emotion and Thanksgiving my favorite holiday. (Note my Inc. Magazine [Read More…]

There’s work to do; or, An open letter to my children

Some may shake their heads in disapproval or approval of the election results, but the bottom line is that there’s work to do, says the dean of Duke Chapel in this sermon, which originally appeared at Faith and Leadership.   By Luke Powery Faith & Leadership offers sermons that shed light on issues of Christian [Read More…]

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Why the #election is a faith and work crisis

I’ve told the story before how a chance phone call from Chris Armstrong in late 2013 involved me, a nice moderate United-Methodist-turned-Episcopalian mainliner who was doctrinally orthodox but not culturally evangelical, in the faith and work movement. Even as a not-particularly-liberal mainline type, one of the barriers to involvement in this space that I had [Read More…]