From the archives: How to choose a career: Advice from a Puritan pastor

Just because there’s a market for a particular line of work doesn’t mean we should do it for a career. The question Baxter makes us ask is strange for modern ears: is this job honorable? [Read more...]

A 1949 guide to doing what you love

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This channel’s been home recently to some musings on the “Do What You Love” school of vocation advice: Jeff Haanen and J. B. Wood have reminded us that God may sometimes want us in places we don’t love, that failure to be in a place where we can do where we love does not mean [Read More...]

Which is a higher calling: building churches or building fences?

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Here’s another post in an occasional series about blue-collar work and meaning that we’re running here on MISSION:WORK. (You can read the first one here.)  Here a pastor and former fence-builder reflects on the differences between the two callings. By Jonathan Huddleston My first day of building fences, my boss took his workers aside during break. He [Read More...]

Teach us to want

Today, we’re simply featuring a friendly reminder that a great book about faith, desire, and vocation, Jen Pollock Michel’s Teach Us to Want, is being featured for a few more days at the Patheos Book Club (until August 15.)  We featured an interview with Jen by Bethany Jenkins of The Gospel Coalition a couple of weeks [Read More...]

God has many kinds of servants (says Martin Luther)

This is one more excerpt from our friends at Christian History Institute and their great new issue of Christian History about work, calling, and vocation in the history of the church.  (The deadline to sign up and get a copy is ⇒TODAY⇐, and you can do that here.) In 1530 Martin Luther wrote a treatise, “On Keeping Children in School”–ironically, arguing [Read More...]

“Have I no harvest but a thorn to let me blood?”

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Since our last poem in this space turned out to be surprisingly popular, here’s another of my favorites about those times when following one’s calling seems difficult.  This poem has been interpreted as Herbert’s wrestling with his own calling of being a priest, and much of the imagery speaks to that. But it has something [Read More...]


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