Shame on You: Shame Cartoons

They’re popping up everywhere in harmless-looking packaging: shame cartoons.

A quick search online will turn up a multitude of articles, op-eds and full-on rants appealing to women’s sense of shame (One particularly delightful article was titled “I appeal to your sense of shame my Muslim sister.”)

And then we have cartoons.

The first kind are pretty straightforward: they want you to get veiled. But rather than engage you in discussions about interpretation of hadith or Qur’an, they try and shame you into wearing it.

As expected, most come across as being judgmental, preachy and rude. And ones that focus so much on women’s dress kind of miss out on an important point: what you put on your head is not necessarily more important than what goes on inside it.

The “hijabi shame cartoons” start from the fairly innocent “the veil is an obligation just like prayer” written next to a woman covering her hair and praying, to the more extreme: I’ve actually seen one of a woman wearing niqab (face veil) which shows her eyes standing in front of a fire (!) because according to that author, showing your eyes is haram (divinely forbidden).

Let’s take a cartoon that’s ‘in the middle’:

First off, it assumes that there is only one correct interpretation of hijab (veil),* and that those who wear it ‘improperly’ (let alone not wear it at all) are in the wrong, wrong, wrong.

Second, it equates dress with behavior, which in some ways is even worse than stereotypes of veiled women (oppressed, asexual, powerless, helpless, low IQ etc). Hijab is seen as the be-all and end-all. I’m a proud hijabi myself, but that doesn’t mean I was automatically transformed into a perfect Muslim the moment I wore it. Just because a woman wears a veil doesn’t meant that she doesn’t struggle with temptations just like any other person, or that she’s better than an unveiled girl.

(I particularly like the touch of designing the cartoon so the face of the veiled woman is ‘glowing’ because she’s so ‘good’).

The second type of shame cartoons are a hundred times worse. Because not only are they trying to shame women into dressing (and acting) in a certain way, but they’re trying to make them think that if they don’t veil and dress ‘properly’ they’re at fault if they get sexually harassed.

There’s a multitude of them out there, with the most recent being the “Veil your lollipop” ads, featuring a covered and uncovered lollipop—with the latter surrounded by flies and with the tagline “You can’t stop them, but you can protect yourself.”

Similarly another ad features a covered and uncovered sweet, this time with the tagline: “A veil to protect or eyes will molest.”


The ad campaigns have attracted furor from local and international press. I don’t know what’s more insulting: the idea that women are candy, or that men are flies.

As has been said numerous times, the veil doesn’t protect women from sexual harassment, which is about power and control, not sexuality. Let’s take Egypt as an example. The recent Egyptian Center for Women’s Rights (ECWR) study told us that in a country where over 80% of the women are veiled, 83% of women are harassed. During the Eid festivities in Egypt in 2006, mass sexual harassments went on downtown (video here), with hundreds of men sexually assaulting women.

What’s worse about the study (which surveyed 2,020 Egyptian men and women and 109 foreign women) is that 62% of Egyptian men surveyed admitted to harassment, and 53% blamed women for bringing it on. Sixty percent of the respondents (male and female) said that scantily clad women are more likely to be harassed though in reality 72% of the women who said they’d been harassed were veiled. But the worst part is the lack of understanding by Egyptian women that the harasser is a criminal and women had a right to dress as they pleased (read more about the study in Faith’s post here and about the “Respect yourself” campaign against sexual harassment in Egypt here.

According to the ECWR:

“[The cartoons] ignore [Egypt's] large Christian minority, promote wearing the veil for wrong reasons, objectify women, portray men as mindless insects, contradict statistics showing that women who wear a veil, even the full face veil, experience high levels of harassment, and contradict religion’s call for respect and personal responsibility for all.”

Harassment in Arabic is “tahroush”, but is referred to in colloquial Arabic as mu’aksa (“teasing”), which is a very light-hearted term that detracts from the seriousness of the situation.

Attaching religion to sexual harassment just fuels the harassers, giving them an excuse for their behavior and coerces women into dressing a certain way when they may not be fully convinced. The ‘blame the victim’ mentality is only compounded by shame cartoons, which absolve the harassers of any wrongdoing. (Mona El-Tahawy has a great post about shame here)

There are also many cartoons that compare veiled women to pearls (where the veil is their ‘protective covering’). These ads are particularly annoying because as we know, the veil does not necessarily offer ‘protection,’ which is a kind of a weak reason to veil in the first place. And that’s another thing these cartoons fail to realize—the desire to ‘cover’ is multifaceted, and is not necessarily related to religion.

For the cartoons that do realize women veil for other reasons, their reasoning is even worse: not only are they trying to brainwash women into believing they are at fault for sexual harassment—they don’t frame veiling as a religious duty. Instead, they say that ‘decent’ girls cover while ‘indecent’ girls don’t. If you take that to its logical conclusion: only ‘indecent’ girls get harassed.

Translation: Who is the happy one? The good woman: Fulfills all her obligations and recites the Qur’an; Vigilant about modesty and calls to God; Does lots of supplementary acts and listens to helpful tapes.

The ‘not good’ woman: Goes to the mall a lot; Wears short and tight [clothing]; Copies the infidels and watches satellite TV channels.

So, what is it about shame? Why are we trying to shame women?

The answer lies in the fact that for many cultures, especially Arab ones, ‘honor’ lies with women, whose reputation, behavior, virginity, and appearance becomes a benchmark for the respectability of a culture.

Arab cultures, for the most part, are ‘shame’ rather than ‘guilt’ cultures, where the reactions and treatment of society mandates an individual’s behavior, rather than his or her personal feelings of right and wrong.

The concept of shame is often confused with modesty. So many cartoons emphasize that you should be ashamed of your body, as if it was an unwanted appendage. Hayaa’ (modesty), an important part of Islam (regardless of how it’s interpreted) is often translated as shame, which is not only incorrect but goes against the fact that Islam says “Certainly We created man in the best make” (95:4) and promotes healthy sexual relationships within the proper framework of marriage.

Appealing to women’s sense of shame (which has already been ‘cultivated’ since they were young) in order to get them to dress in a certain way is a shortcut for the lazy who do not want to engage in proper discussions with them and only care about appearance. But browbeating women for the actions of men is, I’m sorry, just low. How come there are no cartoons shaming men for treating women like objects? No cartoons shaming men into realizing God created men and women as equals?

Search as hard as I could, I could not find one cartoon pointed at men and aimed at shaming them. The best I could come up with were some radio and TV ads that are currently airing in Egypt asking men not to harass women because…wait for it…harassment is harmful to the economy! You see, harassment tarnishes the image of Egypt in the eyes of tourists and they might not want to come, so you should stop. At least during tourist season. You can watch one of the ads here.

But that’s enough from me. What do you all think?

*Please let’s not get into arguments about what constitutes proper dress/whether hijab (however you define it) is mandatory, etc.

  • Philip

    totally agree(those adds are a crime against humanity), but just one thing, unless you are a modernist, hijab being fard is basically agreed by all 4 madhabs.

  • http://muslimahmediawatch.org/ Fatemeh

    @ Philip: “hijab being fard is basically agreed by all 4 madhabs.”

    Not the point. Please stick to the post.

  • WeO

    I’ve enjoyed reading this Ethar, I like how you relate the functions of these ads to the memes installed beforehand in our minds.

    Everyone should seriously read this op-ed and give it a thought. Keep them coming please.

  • http://www.stop-stoning.org Rochelle

    I remember seeing these ads when I was in Iran, particularly the ones dealing with ‘pearls.’ I was in the Tehran airport by myself, carrying tons of heavy bags and all these men were just hanging around seeing me struggle without offering to help. I ended up yelling (in english) “I’m a pearl, goddammit!!!”

    Of course, the most vexing thing about all these ads for me is the objectification part of it. Women are not pearls, nor lollypops, nor any other inanimate man-made thing. I’m a PERSON, who deserves respect and dignity. Stop calling me a lollypop.

  • xatheus

    I am curious Ethar, you have stated:
    “These ads are particularly annoying because as we know, the veil does not necessarily offer ‘protection,’ which is a kind of a weak reason to veil in the first place.”

    I take it your implying that hijab has little to do with protection at all?
    That’s a hard pill to swallow, especially when the word hijab often translates as a barrier, protection or a shield.
    Understood, the best of reasons and intentions come from seeking divine pleasure, but with that in mind practical wisdoms are inextricably linked to actions of piety.

    Secondly, you charge the lollipop ads, interpreting the message as “…if they don’t veil and dress ‘properly’ they’re at fault if they get sexually harassed.”

    Which although I agree, such a message is preposterous. That is not what is being communicated.

    Arabs have a tacky, didactic way of expressing themselves at times but there is a raw truth here.

    ‘Eye candy’ is a phrase well understood regardless where you are from. A woman cannot stop a man from looking upon her with desire, nor is she to blame if he does so. But what she can do is defy the ‘male gaze’, deny ‘him’ the opportunity, thus empowering herself.

    What is truly lacking here, is the call to virtue towards the men, it is easy for men to blame women for their ogling habits. What they look upon is not evil, rather their look is evil and that is what they will be asked about.

    Who wants to do the cartoon for that one? :)

  • Ethar

    @ Philip: Regardless of whether or not people believe hijab is a fard, the question is does that belief make it ok for them to try and coerce women into following that belief?

    @ WeO: Thanks!

  • Ethar

    Oh and I apologize for not translating the first cartoon: The arrows say “before” and “after,” and the tagline says: “Supposed to be wearing hijab.”

  • Nadine Hagar

    This sums up my trembling, speechless anger about these cartoons very eloquently. Thanks, Ethar.

    You know whats interesting though? How pious men suddenly become in Ramadan. I rarely get harassed. Their cat-calls have been replaced by judgmental stares. Apparently, I’m a scantily clad harlot who’s threatening the integrity of their fast. My loose linen pants and baggy shirts are just sooo risque.

  • http://samaha.wordpress.com/ samaha

    “72% of the women who said they’d been harassed were veiled”

    any theories in this study as to why?

  • cranberrie_21

    commenting for the first time ever :)

    I so very totally agree with this entire post! The sad part is that, most women and girls actually find these useless emails worthy enough of being forwarded around, meaning that they actually feel them to be correct!

    Whether hijaab is mandatory or not, is a discussion for another post and another day. But lets just face it, in trying to enforce the hijaab, our culture(s) has (have) failed (I say cultures because the use of women as a measure of modesty is not only the case with Arab societies, My Asian societies are pretty adamant about this too).

    But it has, however, succeeded in making a muslim woman feel ashamed of herself if she is beautiful or has a good physique. After all, beauty is such an alluring SIN that it needs to be stashed away, and hidden, and requires too much protection, and is solely responsible for her harassment. If she is beautiful, she is automatically guilty. If she looks pretty, its her “fault”, rather than a blessing from Allah (SWT). True, how she presents the beauty around (either by concealing it or by flaunting it) is her and hers alone choice.

  • INAL

    I am on the verge of believing that its a damn shame to be a woman, female, feminine…

    Shameful to think
    Shameful to feel
    Shameful to dream
    Shameful to want
    Shameful to desire
    Shameful to be

    Shame, Shame, Shame…if I were to raise my daughters based on that, they would now be the most neurotic humans on earth…addicted to something because they are in search of space where they are not the instigators, propagators, and receptacles all in one shot- man as if we were really that busy!

    A cloth has become someones battle cry, weapon, shield, poison, salvation…but it is not OURS…

  • Ethar

    Salams,

    @ Rochelle: Ha, that’s funny. And I love it how we’re pearls when ‘they’ want us to live in an “isolated thick shell,” in a “safe zone” “buried at the bottom of the sea,” but not when it comes to chivalry.

    (I’m quoting from a piece I performed in an Egyptian version of “The Vagina Monologues”—I think you can find it on YouTube. Halfway through the piece I kind of shout “I am not a pearl! I repeat, I am not a pearl. I am human.”)

    @ Xatheus: I meant protection from harassment. It’s very true that “practical wisdoms are inextricably linked to actions of piety,” but what I meant in this sense is that when these practical wisdoms become non-existent or negligible it seems kind of silly to wear the veil if that is your only reason for doing so. i.e. if you’re wearing the veil in Egypt so you don’t get harassed and yet you still do, then…?

    Plus protection is very subjective, and what the veil going to ‘protect you’ from means different things to different women. I didn’t go more into this because it’s not the point of the post, but there are many many reasons women veil and religious duty is only one of them.

    In Egypt (and this is based on extensive research I’ve done) women wear the veil because it is fashionable, because of cultural impositions, because they believe that a covered woman is a respected woman and also as a protective mechanism.

    The veil is also seen by many as an act of personal liberation, respresenting freedom from the ‘oppression of the western world,’ freedom from unwanted male advances, freedom from being judged solely on appearance, and freedom to speak out in a male dominated society. There’s also the whole political aspect to it but let’s not get into that.

    As for the lollipop ads, well, that’s my interpretation. Your logic is correct, and I see no problem with a woman covering to stop men ‘looking’ (and there are many women who cover for this reason). But my argument is that if she doesn’t, it’s not her fault that he looks, just as many still will even if she covers.

    I forgot to add this quote with regards to the ads that I felt was very appropriate (from an ECWR press release):

    “[The cartoons] ignore [Egypt's] large Christian minority, promote wearing the veil for wrong reasons, objectify women, portray men as mindless insects, contradict statistics showing that women who wear a veil, even the full face veil, experience high levels of harassment, and contradict religion’s call for respect and personal responsibility for all.”

    As for the cartoon, here’s hoping :)

    @ Nadine: But of course. Did you get the men giving you sneaky looks and then saying “Allahum eny sa’em!” [Oh God, I am fasting]. It’s kind of hilarious, really.

  • Ethar

    @ Samaha: It all goes back to the fact that sexual harassment isn’t considered a crime (by these men, at least). Many of the men in the study actually considered it non-offensive, and many said women like it when they harass them!

    From one of the ECWR press releases:

    “Mohsen Rady, MP […] outlined reasons why he thinks sexual harassment happens: absence of rule of law, lack of concern in society for harassment, people’s silence when harassment occurs instead of reporting it to the police, and the political, economic, and social situation in the country. Furthermore, he believes there is an absence of morals, which explains why veiled women are harassed.”

    “Dr. Hamdy Abdel Azem, Professor of Political and Economic Sciences and Former Head of the Sadat Academy, stated that sexual harassment is a moral problem and abnormal behavior. He suggested that reasons for sexual harassment could be unemployment, but harassment occurs at all economic levels, not just among the poor. There is a common belief that only poor men harass because marriage is very expensive, but men of all income levels harass to appear popular with women.* Increased use of drugs and alcohol may also be a factor since there is a correlation between drugs and corruption.”

    *my emphasis. I’m sorry, what?

    You can read more about the study and ECWR’s activities here: http://ecwronline.org/index.php?option=com_frontpage&Itemid=1&lang=english

    @ cranberrie_21: Yay! Thanks for posting and for the great comment.

    @ INAL: I do hope things haven’t deteriorated to that extent! And it’s our job to make sure that (insh’Allah) they don’t.

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  • http://www.stop-stoning.org Rochelle

    To xatheus:

    Are we really to believe that men are incapable of controling themselves from sexually harrassing women? If I was a man, I would be incredibly offended by these ads. They imply that men are like animals, that they MUST sexually degrade and harrass women unless they wear hijab. And the they don’t even stop then! Most hijabis are harrassed anyway!

    Perhaps they cannot control themselves from looking upon a woman with desire. I get that–it’s very difficult to control what you desire. But they do have the power to keep from harrassing women, from making them feel violated and powerless.

  • laila

    Great work, great examples, great point!

    I always hear many stereotypes of un-veiled women from many Muslims and the sad thing is they always complain how their stereotyped for wearing a veil.

    “‘Hijab is seen as the be-all and end-all. I’m a proud hijabi myself, but that doesn’t mean I was automatically transformed into a perfect Muslim the moment I wore it”.

    Yes I’ve noticed this as well, and Mona Eltahawy also noted this when she said “when you wear a veil your viewed as the Quran in motion”. And as a hijabi myself I’ve noticed extremely high expectations placed on veiled women which iis not fair, and it’s really alienating. But then again there are some veiled women with this attitude, that once they veil they automatically believe their superior or have more worth or honour to an unveiled women. What’s up with this holier than thou attitude in our community.

    No one has the right to tell you that your shameful, or judge you. The right to humilate belongs only to God. People are created in dignity and respect.

  • http://muslimahmediawatch.org/ Fatemeh

    @ Ethar: This is worth repeating, so I’m going to do it!

    “[The cartoons] ignore [Egypt's] large Christian minority, promote wearing the veil for wrong reasons, objectify women, portray men as mindless insects, contradict statistics showing that women who wear a veil, even the full face veil, experience high levels of harassment, and contradict religion’s call for respect and personal responsibility for all.”

    I totally agree!

  • Sakina & Sara

    I think that often we miss the point that hijab is from Allah and that if men still are gazing then its their problem and they will be questioned about it. We are not responsible for their actions. I do so love your articles and yes thanks for linking up. About the last Arabic poster, one comment about it, is that especially in Saudi Arabia, that there is friction within families sometimes when woman choose to wear the “shoulder” abayas which is the one on the left, versus the “abaya ras” or head abaya on the right, which is what the stricter families demand of their womenfolk. There is a whole “social scale” depending upon which kind of abaya and scarf a woman wears which I find so rediculous that to this degree we judge one another when we should be busy with our own actions and leave the judgement up to Allah swt.

    Keep up the great job.
    Sankina
    islamzpeace.wordpress

  • Sakina & Sara

    I think that often we miss the point that hijab is from Allah and that if men still are gazing then its their problem and they will be questioned about it. We are not responsible for their actions. I do so love your articles and yes thanks for linking up. About the last Arabic poster, one comment about it, is that especially in Saudi Arabia, that there is friction within families sometimes when woman choose to wear the “shoulder” abayas which is the one on the left, versus the “abaya ras” or head abaya on the right, which is what the stricter families demand of their womenfolk. There is a whole “social scale” depending upon which kind of abaya and scarf a woman wears which I find so rediculous that to this degree we judge one another when we should be busy with our own actions and leave the judgement up to Allah swt.

    Keep up the great job.
    Sankina
    islamzpeace.wordpress

  • Ethar

    @ Laila: Of course, and that’s one of the problems of judging people based on a piece of cloth they wear.

    I’ll be honest with you; I used to be one of those women who believed hijab somehow made them superior to those who didn’t wear it and would hold veiled girls at a higher standard than non-veiled ones (though I never went so far as expecting non-veiled women to act badly and veiled ones to act saintly)

    But I came to realize that behavior matters so much more! Plus hijab doesn’t automatically equal modesty. Another cartoon I really like (though it can also be critiqued) is this one:

    http://www.new.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=3120838&id=522785413&ref=share

    The veiled women in the cartoon are saying: “Does she not feel ashamed* of herself going out with no veil? She’s so ill-behaved!”

    *They use the word hay’aa but in this context they mean ashamed.

    But a good point that cartoon illustrates is that modesty in general is the ‘Islamic’ requirement—not just a piece of cloth covering your hair.

    @ Sakina and Sara: Thanks for linking! I didn’t want to elaborate too much on the ‘Saudi’ cartoon since it speaks for itself. The story of how I got it is actually funny, and you can read it here:

    http://musingsofamademoiselle.blogspot.com/2007/04/fitnathe-saudi-guys-story.html

    But basically, I was given it by a man in Saudi Arabia who followed me around calling me a ‘fitna.’ I thought it was relevant here because it is equating dress with behavior. (I also like the graphic cartoons of hell fire and paradise). But since it’s Saudi, the ‘bad’ dress is a woman in a BLACK abaya and BLACK headscarf with simple embroidery on it.

    Another interesting topic of discussion is how dress is relative: like the Saudi cartoon shows, ‘abaya ras’ is bad in Saudi. In Egypt, veiled or not, showing your stomach is a big no-no, but in India, your stomach is like an arm. Etc, etc.

  • Ethar

    Oh, and in case you can’t see the cartoon for some reason, it’s basically two women in bright, skintight clothing but covering their hair talking about a non-veiled woman in an extremely loosefitting long sleeved sweatshirt and skirt.

    ie their understanding of veiling = cover your hair, not modesty.

  • Sobia

    @ Ethar:

    Even that cartoon is offensive. Its a matter of who defines modesty. As you said, modesty is relevant.

  • Sobia

    Sorry…I mean modesty is relative, not relevant.

  • laila

    “…but in India, your stomach is like an arm.”

    That is so true. Modesty in India is different. Clothing is based on the time period, based on the people, the culture and their energy, based on the conditions of their environment.

    Modesty is different with even Nuns (and I’m going to give this example for all the people who use Nuns for examples of veils). Some Nuns show skin from the hand to the elbow and to a bit of the fore arm. Some show parts of their legs in a 3 quarter skirt (tea bag skirts-which aren’t that long). Some times their veil covers all their hair, some times their bangs and some more hair is shown. And some times some Nuns show all their hair because the veil is not part of their habit . Some eastern Orthodox nuns where long black veils and clothing. Some Nuns claim they get more favorable impressions and treatment when their in a White habit that resembles a nurse, compared to the black (with a tinge of white) habit. Each community of Nuns or Sisters have their own habit, even Mother Theresa habit was based on an Indian Sari***. Nobody told Mother Theresa, “you habit is too Indian, conform with such and such”.

    Besides when one thinks of Mother Theresa you shouldn’t be thinking of her clothing, it was her actions, her charities, her noble generosity, her kind words. The clothes Don’t Make the man or woman, it’s your character and your qualites. None of those Cartoons can demonstrated a person integrity or good manners. Some people who wore suits on wallstreet have wore or will wear orange jumpers .

    Who has the right to define or in this case illustrate Modesty? But Ethar like you said this goes one step further and “it equates dress with behavior”. So when a women is sexually assualted or harassed. the abuser states “She was Asking for it”, “She wanted it, I was just giving it to her”.

    The clothes don’t make a WOMAN.

  • Ethar

    @ Sobia: I agree. That’s why I was saying that cartoon has its own problems.

    @ laila: Totally agree. What we have to work towards now is getting away from the (wrong) belief that associates piety with outward appearance.

  • http://chocolatemintsinajar.com/ jessyz

    I agree somewhat because they have totally neglected the fact that men should lower their gaze if they see a woman who is not modest. The cartoons depict men as devoid of free will and are hormonal animals who must look. They too are responsible of their actions, sexual harassment is a voluntary action not an involuntary reaction.

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  • Melinda

    The whole thing makes me so sad. But excellent post, Ethar.

  • http://www.admirimi.com Admirim

    Excellent post!
    It is a well established fact that some “hijabis”, if not most consider themselves superior to other women. Do you think this is by large the by-product of these campaigns or is it something deeper?

  • Aynur

    @Admirim …. interesting subtopic. I can’t answer that though myself…

  • nobody

    BismillahirRahmanirRahim

    selam alaykum — very interesting article. I don’t know what the answers are… Your passing obseration about the glow around the face of the cartoon hijabi made me a little sad though. Some time ago I used to live at a Sufi dergah, and after being there a while, keeping salat and making zikr every day, not committing any major sins, sometimes during Fajr or during the zikr at night I could literally see a glow of light coming off people’s skin. It was beautiful, and remembering it now reminds me of a time when I felt closer to Allah than I do today…

    It does seem that many Muslims are more interested in controlling each other than drawing closer to Allah. In a wonderful book called *Healing the Shame that Binds You*, John Bradford talks about the difference between healthy shame (shame that motivates us to correct our mistakes) and toxic shame (existential shame that makes us ashamed to be who we are). Check it out?

    selam alaykum…

  • Ethar

    @ Admirim: Thanks!

    That’s an interesting idea—and I’m in no way qualified to answer it. But speaking from my own personal experience, it comes from a belief that you are more ‘Muslim’ than non-veiled women are, that you have gone further ‘down the path.’

    Unfortunately, this belief fails to take into account that iman faith is not something you can see. The tangible manifestations of Islam (veil, beard, holding a rosary, praying etc) in no way represent what the status of a person’s heart is, and how close s/he is to their God. Once you get that, you stop judging based on what you ‘see.’

    @ Nobody: You misunderstand what I meant about the glow…I meant that the cartoon was trying to tell us dress in a certain way (excluding the ‘pray all prayers on time’ bit), and you will get that glow.

    I know what you mean about people who have faces that seem to glow. I spent six weeks in a Tarim, a tiny village in Yemen this summer studying in an Islamic school, and I know what you mean. My point is, this glow doesn’t come if I ‘look’ a certain way—it comes from the status of my heart.

    The book sounds interesting. I will def. check it out.

  • http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2008/10/28/do2805.xml You might as well laugh

    I can’t stop laughing at the second cartoon. It brings to mind the glances I’ve seen towards the younger Somali women in my local area in north London from those perhaps a decade older. They are no so much disapproving of a more obviously fashionable younger generation as in awe. Why wouldn’t these women in their thirties, flapping around beneath those dark layers be envious of the enlightenment of those who walk without fear of condemnation.

    [This comment has been moderated to fit within comment guidelines.]

  • http://www.nbrobert.co.uk Na’ima B. Robert

    SubhanAllah, it really is pathetic how ALL these cartoons are aimed at women, at our supposedly innate sense of ‘shame’ – as if men don’t and shouldn’t feel shame for their actions.
    A journalist once slapped me in the face (figuratively speaking, of course) with the statement that, in Islam, shame is a woman’s trait while honour is a man’s trait. Seems these catoons are appealing to this sort of mentality… how depressing.

  • COVERYOURLOLLIPOP!

    this is kind of off topic but Ive come accross men in the uk who will attack a woman for spite if they somehow think she thinks she’s too good for them, if a woman covers herself some men will take this as a personal insult,so wearing a hijab would offer little protection against these ignorant creeps, also sickeningly enough Ive heard about a niqab fetish-which just goes to show that a certain amount of responsability has to lie with the man, no matter how much you cover up, there will still be a group of men who will have these thoughts,anyway surely it is wrong to try and scare women into covering for the wrong reasons.Also,a lot of the time sexual assault seems to be about ego and control,once this man I knew forced himself on me after I’d said no several times,and how he was it seemed like he couldnt stand not to get his own way,like how dare she turn me down,who does she think she is rather than not being able to control his urge,which brings me back to what I said a minute ago.Also, this is completely ramdom, but as someone who’s been sexually assualted on several occasions,I recommend wearing jeans under your normal clothes if you have to go out on your own very late at night(as tight as possible,so if you ever were unfortunate enough to get attacked they would struggle with the jeans which would buy you more time to try and get free,sorry to sound patronizing but I never thought of this myself until I nearly got raped on a late night train wearing a long skirt with just underwear underneath,he wouldve got a lot less near raping me if I’d had tight ,awkward jeans on.

  • orangey

    After seeing those little ads, I don’t whether to laugh or cry. I mean the cartoon that was in the middle made me giggle, but the one after that..the not-so-good woman who “…Copies the infidels and watches satellite TV channels” THAT one was a real piece of work. Honestly,though, it’s not creepy and preachy cartoons and ads like those that inspire Muslim women- it’s real things like the Quran and Sunnah.


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