Friday Links | November 19, 2010

Nicholas Kristof tells us about a Muslim woman fighting terrorism with microloans.

A woman and her boyfriend will be lashed 100 times each, jailed and deported from the Emirates for committing unlawful sex.

A Conservative local politician has been arrested after he called for a female Muslim journalist to be stoned to death.

Mona Eltahawy thinks that Saudi Arabia’s spot on the UN commission for women’s rights is a joke. Eman Al Nafjan doesn’t.

The New York Times profiles Daisy Khan.

On women, homophobia, and homosexuality in Egypt.

Women and girls are exploited by Bangladesh’s quarry industry.

The Scavenger inteviews Sabina England.

A UNICEF study shows that community-driven change that addresses the complex social dynamics associated with FGM is more successful at ending the practice.

Elan magazine profiles Mubarakah Ibrahim.

A young woman thinking of converting to Islam recounts her first experience praying at a mosque.

Al Jazeera looks at the lives of Balkan widows.

The New York Times discusses Saudi women and competitive sports participation.

Women’s eNews examines the life of one Iraqi refugee in Syria who is pressured into prostitution.

Dawn examines the rise of “Allah’s tailors” in Turkey.

Another story about how Angelina Jolie’s new movie is angering and insulting Bosnian war survivors.

Many Muslim women in India celebrate Chhath, a Hindu festival in Bihar, India.

ReligionDispatches interviews a cast member on NBC’s Outsourced.

MuslimMatters reviews a history of Muslim women’s rights in France and Afghanistan (part 1).

Nasrin Sotoudeh’s illegal detention continues.

A three-day conference in Kuala Lumpur examined the challenges that blended families face.

A Nigerian governor’s wife sends out an eid message for Muslim women to love one another.

CAIR Canada told a National Assembly committee on Bill 94 that the niqab bill is unconstitutional because it would limit personal choice and freedom of religion.

Rabia Z comes out with a line of designer sportswear.

The Times of India reports that Karachi is too cosmopolitan for burqas. Perhaps even too cosmopolitan for the headscarf.

Iran “Islamicizes” ties, dolls, and software.

The Vancouver Observer talks to four “hip hijabis” about their relationship to the headscarf and fashion in general.

Eid is lots of fun, right? Unless you’re working all day like lots of women.

Some “he said, she said” in an Australian court room.

Muslim women hold a photography exhibit showcasing their lives for a Mumbai festival.

A transnational collaboration to challenge the assertion that Muslim women are all oppressed.

Did we miss any news about Muslim women from this week? Feel free to post links in the comments!