Friday Links

Linda Sarsour is a woman in a hurry. Only 35, she has already helped to partly dismantle the New York Police Department’s program of spying on the city’s Muslims and has worked with officials in City Hall to close public schools for the observance of two of Islam’s most important holy days. The New York Times writes a special profile on Sarsour.

Inside Behpooshi Modelling School in Tehran, models-to-be learn to pose and catwalk in accordance with Iranian law. The Middle East Eye highlights Iran’s first modelling agency.

Indian Muslim women want a ban on oral and unilateral divorce and punishment for the qazis (clerics) for sending such divorce notice. A majority of the women rejected polygamy saying their husbands should not marry again under any circumstance during the life of an existing marriage.

The introduction of anti-terrorism laws in Australia has made Muslim victims of family violence afraid to contact authorities for protection, an advocacy group says.

A leading Nigerian civil rights group has condemned calls to ban hijab in northern Nigeria, warning that any such ban would offer no solution to the problem of Boko Haram extremism.

“The headscarf on my head doesn’t stop my brain from working. Being female and Muslim doesn’t make me oppressed or brainwashed. My gender doesn’t prevent me from pointing out to my co-religionists that things need to be better for Muslim women,” writes Shelina Zahra Janmohamed for the National.

Mahasin Shamsid-Deen, who is a teacher and a writer, conducted an analytic study on how Muslim names and dress lead to bullying in American schools. The experience of being a Muslim student in America’s public school system is unique to each young person. These personal challenges are a natural part of growing up and build character.

A new play at Birmingham Rep hopes to be a knockout , as it’s set in a boxing ring. No Guts, No Heart, No Glory is about the expectations placed on young Muslim women and is devised in collaboration with former national boxing champion Ambreen Sadiq.

 


Browse Our Archives

Follow Us!