Open Letter to Daphne Bramham on Women’s Soccer… and Burqas

I recently penned a letter to a Canadian journalist whose article was sent to me by a friend. For the most part, it was a  fantastic piece commenting on the funding inequalities of women in sports - particularly soccer. As a player, coach and supporter of women’s soccer. I was pleased to read it. Until the last paragraph of this intelligent, well researched articles plunged into a racist, Islamophobic, ridiculous abyss lined with veils. I responded on Twitter, addressing the author directly. Da … [Read more...]

And the Hijabs and Niqabs Won’t Go Away!

Source

During a period of time right after my conversion to Islam, I contemplated the idea of wearing hijab. I rushed off to several stores and bought a giant scarf collection that now sits in my dresser. I experimented with the veil, and I was basically a weekend hijabi (I wore it to go to the mosque and to hang out with my Muslim friends). I even tried out niqab after a friend convinced me of wearing it to go shopping. Later on, I decided that neither hijab nor niqab were going to work out for me… In … [Read more...]

Sri Lanka: “When Sleeping Women Wake, Mountains Move”

This post was written by guest contributor Hafsa, and originally published at Sisterhood.Last June, while visiting a north-western province in Sri Lanka, I had the chance of observing a community development initiative that focused on women’s empowerment and enhancing their role in participatory democracy. One of interesting prescripts that I observed was that most of the requests came from local women, who brought their concerns to informal gatherings; from where community organizers took o … [Read more...]

The Subtleties of Being Caught in the Crossfire

Maryam Basir. [Source].

This post was written by guest contributor Amina Jabbar (@AminaJabbar).Amina Jabbar, Twitter handle: @AminaJabbarIn a recent article, “Muslim women are caught in the crossfire between bigots on both sides,” Sara Khan thoughtfully maps the spaces that Western Muslimahs negotiate. Muslim women, on one end, are more likely to experience Islamophobic violence than Muslim men. In the UK, Khan notes, as much as 54% of the violence is perpetrated by those with links to the British National Par … [Read more...]

Would the Real Muslim Woman Please Stand Up?

Panelists at a symposium on Islamophobia, hosted by the American Islamic College.

Editor's Note: This post was written by Yasmin Ali.  I apologise for not including her name when this was originally posted. - KristaI recently attended a symposium on Islamophobia at American Islamic College titled “Facing Religious Intolerance: Islamophobia in the 21st Century .” Panel members included Nathan Lean as well as Ahmed Rehab and Dr. Farid Hafez.  The panel was moderated by Laith Al-Saud, who is a professor of Islamic World Studies at DePaul University.   Nathan Lean is a scholar … [Read more...]

Zero Dark Thirty: A Tale of Bias and Burqas

Zero Dark Thirty - Maya

This post was written by guest contributor Emaan Majed.The scene opens on a bustling Peshawar market. The street vendors peddle ripe oranges and bananas. Decorated rickshaws bustle through busy streets as Maya, the determined female protagonist of Zero Dark Thirty, makes her way to her destination. But in contrast to actual Peshawar markets, the only Muslim women on the movie screen are two briefly seen, unnamed extras wearing sky blue Afghan chadris.The central narrative of Zero Dark … [Read more...]

French Magazine Le Point’s Shameless Headline

November 1 cover of Le Point.

France is and will always be my special soapbox, so I guess I shouldn’t be surprised when crap like this comes out. On November 1st, the magazine ran a cover with a niqabi (OF COURSE) on the front, with the headline “Cet Islam sans gêne” (This Brazen Islam), with a sub-headline of examples of where Muslims are behaving badly: schools, cafeterias, pools, schools, school programs. Note that in France these are always the examples of Muslims behaving badly, the actual content is such weak sauce I wo … [Read more...]


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