Henry Thoreau on Walking as a Spiritual Practice

 

 

 

I have met with but one or two persons in the course of my life who understood the art of Walking, that is, of taking walks — who had a genius, so to speak, for sauntering, which word is beautifully derived “from idle people who roved about the country, in the Middle Ages, and asked charity, under pretense of going a la Sainte Terre, to the Holy Land, till the children exclaimed, “There goes a Sainte-Terrer,” a Saunterer, a Holy-Lander. They who never go to the Holy Land in their walks, as they pretend, are indeed mere idlers and vagabonds; but they who do go there are saunterers in the good sense, such as I mean. Some, however, would derive the word from sans terre, without land or a home, which, therefore, in the good sense, will mean, having no particular home, but equally at home everywhere. For this is the secret of successful sauntering. He who sits still in a house all the time may be the greatest vagrant of all; but the saunterer, in the good sense, is no more vagrant than the meandering river, which is all the while sedulously seeking the shortest course to the sea.

Henry Thoreau

Walking

 

 

"I'd love to know the author of the FB post. Sounds like we may have ..."

Ten Rules for Social Engagement: A ..."
"Here's an interesting piece you might already be familiar with. --. http://www.thezensite.com/Z...The author doesn't consider ..."

No Zen Masters in the West
"This raises the very important question of the relation between zen and concept. Like no ..."

No Zen Masters in the West
"Why wait? Walk on fire today right now, step by step. [kick]"

No Zen Masters in the West

Browse Our Archives

Follow Us!


What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment