Three Questions for American Muslims: Rabiah Ahmed

The Muslim Portal at Patheos  is hosting the “Three Questions” project for the month of September in conjunction with the tenth anniversary of the terrorist acts of 9/11.  We are asking American Muslims from across the nation three simple but important questions. Click here to learn more about the project.

Rabiah Ahmed, director of Mirza PR and a board member of the My Faith My Voice project, offers her answers to the three questions:

1. What is the most pressing issue or concern for you as a Muslim in America today, 10 years after the tragedy of 9/11?

 10 years after 9/11, I am concerned that we are still a fairly insular community. Most of the conversations we have are still had within Muslim circles. We need to break out of our comfort zones and reach out to people of different faiths and backgrounds. I think we will learn a great deal about our neighbors, our colleagues, and our follow countrymen and find it easier to relate to them in a real, meaningful ways.

2. In what ways – inwardly /or outwardly – did 9/11 change you or affect you?

I have always wanted to use my interest in the field of mass communication to help my community, but the events of 9/11 made it a near necessity. There is a great deal of work yet to be done in terms of building better interfaith relations in America today, and I feel like coming up with creative opportunities for us to engage and get to know one another is one small way I can contribute to advancing society.

3. What do you think non-Muslim Americans most need to know about Muslims?

For the past 10 years, American Muslims have devoted much of their time, resources and efforts into trying to get people of other faiths to know our faith and community better. While that is very important, I think what might be more helpful is if we (American Muslims) dedicated the next ten years trying to get to know America better. By talking less and listening more, we will be in a better position to understand and address the needs and concerns of others.

About Dilshad Ali
  • Samina Abdullah

    In my opinion, the best way to communicate with society at large is to do what the Book tells us to do. ‘Amal saleh’ is linked to belief in so many places that even a cursory reading tells us that this is what defines a Muslim. The wonder of it is that as a community our record of doing good is non existent. If we do bestir ourselves, we help only Muslims!
    How can we be recognized as an asset to U.S. society if we have nothing to offer except talk?


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