who’s in who’s image?

who's in who's image cartoon by nakedpastor david hayward

“Who’s In Who’s Image?” (cartoon by nakedpastor David Hayward)

The number one commandment is against idolatry because it’s our number one problem. And it begins in the mind. A thought of God is formed and we bow down before it and worship it.

The word is not the thing. The thought is not the thing.

Imagine that!

About David Hayward

David Hayward runs the blog nakedpastor as a graffiti artist on the walls of religion where he critiques religion… specifically Christianity and the church. He also runs the online community The Lasting Supper where people can help themselves discover, explore and live in spiritual freedom.

  • http://thewoundedbird.blogspot.com Grandmère Mimi

    Brilliant because it’s true.

  • http://theoldadam.com/ theoldadam

    That’s what we do!

    We make ourselves into little gods. Every day.

  • Tracy Williams

    Love your work, David. Keep it up. : )

  • Caryn LeMur

    Where do I plead guilty? God is so huge. His thoughts are so high above our thoughts that we cannot compare. He is so beyond the church building, the church sacrements, the church pastors, the doctrines of avoidance and exclusion — the Kingdom of God is enormous. Amen and amen.

    Much love in Christ always and unconditionally; Caryn

  • http://nakedpastor.com David Hayward

    and i love your comments tracy :)

  • Carol

    If God created man in his image, we have more than reciprocated. –Voltaire

    “The difference between you and God is that God doesn’t think He’s you. ” — Anne Lamott

    You can safely assume that you’ve created God in your own image when it turns out that God hates all the same people you do. ~Anne Lamott

  • Adam Julians

    Yes indeed and this is what some who do not believe in God existing have said happens. The God is humankind’s creation in order to have something to believe in that doesn’t really exist that unifies everyone for social acdvantage.

    And isn’t that what happens sometimes in churches? That God in the true snese of who he is is kept out. And though there is the language of God, it has more to do with the human institution and what people in that insituttion are comfortable with about what they want God to be?

    I would confess I have been like that either willingly or wihtout intending to. Lord have mercy!

    So yeah nothing new under the sun – gloden calfs popping up all over the place.

    Good to be reinided of that by your cartoon and words David and keeping that awareness up!

  • Carol

    Human nature is human nature. The universal idol is the Imperial Self.

    Unless we consciously practice frequent and penetratingly honest examinations of our consciences, sub-conscious self-interest and desires will motivate our behavior.

    The only difference between secularists and most religious people is that the secular people don’t claim Divine sanction for the pursuit of the selfish interests and desires of themselves and those they love at the expense of others.

    The idols of moral people are not usually what we would consider evils; but a good for which we have an inordinate love, something intrinsically good that we love more that God.

    An idolatrous love of family is often behind the lack of courage in many Christians to speak out against abuse and unethical practices in the workplace.

    Whoever loves father or mother more than me is not worthy of me, and whoever loves son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me. Matthew 10:37

    “I distrust those people who know so well what God wants them to do because I notice it always coincides with their own desires.” –Susan B. Anthony

    “The degree to which you will awaken will be in direct proportion to the amount of truth you can accept about yourself.” –Dr. Robert Anthony

    “To everyone is given the key to the gates of heaven. The same key opens the gates of hell.” — Richard Feynman

    “The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you’re the easiest person to fool. ” ~Richard Feynman

    Many a man thinks he is buying pleasure, when he is really selling himself to it. –Ben Franklin

    I have known more men destroyed by the desire to have wife and child and to keep them in comfort than I have seen destroyed by drink and harlots. ~William Butler Yeats

  • http://www.welcometoleftfield.blogspotcom jonathan pelton

    This is why it comforts me so much when God and His commands don’t make sense.

  • Pingback: Who’s In Whose Image?

  • Mary

    My FAV: “You are not disagreeing with me, you are disagreeing with God.” That one always comes up when someone is not willing to admit that they aren’t All-Knowing.

  • http://thought-brigitte.blogspot.com Brigitte

    This came from the Chesterton society, today. I thought it fit in an oblique way. It’s fine to say it’s all beyond the word, but what is it you actually mean by that?

    “THIS, incidentally, is almost the whole weakness of Nietzsche, whom some are representing as a bold and strong thinker. No one will deny that he was a poetical and suggestive thinker; but he was quite the reverse of strong. He was not at all bold. He never put his own meaning before himself in bald abstract words: as did Aristotle and Calvin, and even Karl Marx, the hard, fearless men of thought. Nietzsche always escaped a question by a physical metaphor, like a cheery minor poet. He said, “beyond good and evil,” because he had not the courage to say, “more good than good and evil,” or, “more evil than good and evil.” Had he faced his thought without metaphors, he would have seen that it was nonsense. So, when he describes his hero, he does not dare to say, “the purer man,” or “the happier man,” or “the sadder man,” for all these are ideas; and ideas are alarming. He says “the upper man,” or “over man,” a physical metaphor from acrobats or alpine climbers. Nietzsche is truly a very timid thinker. He does not really know in the least what sort of man he wants evolution to produce. And if he does not know, certainly the ordinary evolutionists, who talk about things being “higher,” do not know either.”

    ~G.K. Chesterton, ‘Orthodoxy.’

  • Carol

    Normally I love Chesterton, but I think he failed to understand what Nietzsche was saying in Beyond Good and Evil, which was that God’s Love did not depend on man’s merit. That is a central Christian teaching which many Christians find offensive since they have fallen into the Galatian heresy of beginning in the Gospel, but returning to the Law: saved by Grace,but remain saved by our obedience.

    Nietzsche was not a strong man, he was a very vulnerable man what many mental health professionals would call a “highly sensitive person” [HSP]. He had a mental breakdown over the sight of a man beating a horse and had to be carried away after sobbing and clinging to the horse’s neck.
    Nietzsche did not fare well in a society where many professing Christians were proclaiming a God who was more like Thor or one of the OT Baalim than the Father God proclaimed by Jesus in the parable of the Prodigal Son [which is really the Parable of the Loving Father]. No wonder Nietzsche wanted that “God” to be dead! I think Nietzsche’s desire was prophetic, the God of Dogmatic Absolutism is “dead” for many Christians. Fortunately, the Pneuma God that Jesus promised to be with us after his Ascension is alive and well and still very active among. Often more active in the world than in a Church that is still clinging to many of its medieval traditions which bind it like a grave cloth.

    I rather suspect that had Nietzsche seen God that Jesus proclaimed in the lives of the professing Christians around him he would have opened himself up to a Divine Embrace. Nietzche was just such a vulnerable person as was always drawn to God through the words and actions of Jesus.

    I might believe in the Redeemer if His followers looked more Redeemed. –Fredrick Nietzsche

    The word “Christianity” is already a misunderstanding – in reality there has been only one Christian, and he died on the Cross.–Friedrich Nietzsche

    What is done out of love always takes place beyond good and evil.
    Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil, Aphorism 153

    The Christian resolution to find the world ugly and bad has made the world ugly and bad. –Friedrich Nietzsche

    All things are subject to interpretation whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth. –Friedrich Nietzsche

    Art raises its head where creeds relax. –Friedrich Nietzsche

    Convictions are more dangerous foes of truth than lies. –Friedrich Nietzsche

    Glance into the world just as though time were gone: and everything crooked will become straight to you. –Friedrich Nietzsche

    Not necessity, not desire – no, the love of power is the demon of men. Let them have everything – health, food, a place to live, entertainment – they are and remain unhappy and low-spirited: for the demon waits and waits and will be satisfied. –Friedrich Nietzsche

    Nothing has been purchased more dearly than the little bit of reason and sense of freedom which now constitutes our pride. –Friedrich Nietzsche

    One has to pay dearly for immortality; one has to die several times while one is still alive.
    –Friedrich Nietzsche

    The “kingdom of Heaven” is a condition of the heart – not something that comes “upon the earth” or “after death.” –Friedrich Nietzsche

    Whoever battles with monsters had better see that it does not turn him into a monster. And if you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you. –Friedrich Nietzsche

  • Gun Nordström

    Carol, thank you for quoting so many of Nietzsche´s deep aphorisms! It´s like listening to Jesus preaching.
    What comes to good and evil I feel that the symbol of Adam and Eva in paradise eating of the “Three of life” refers to us as souls letting us be born with free will to this beautiful planet where we have to live in duality choosing between good and evil, until we are evolving beyond the duality of good and evil.
    In other words when we are beginning to turn inwards and becoming aware of the true source of our souls. We are reconnecting with the “kingdom of Heaven” as a condition of the heart when we remember who we are. Thus”truth is a pathless land” (J.Krishnamurti) and no-one can show it to others, only be living it day by day.

  • Carol

    We can look to others like Krishnamurti or Merton, or whomever speaks to our hearts as well as our minds, for guidance but, in the end, it is we who have to decide. As one wag put it, “God doesn’t have any grandchildren, only children.”


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