the blood of Jesus and LGBTQ solidarity

rainbow blood of jesus cartoon by nakedpastor david hayward

Want a print of this cartoon shipped to your home? Click on it to shop!

No, Jesus didn’t bleed rainbow blood. But I am certain that his story is one of solidarity with those who are labeled, marginalized and persecuted because of who or what they are.

It was one thing for the religious to oppose Jesus. But once they marshaled the corroboration of the government, then they could successfully exterminate him.

This is happening to gays now in Russia. As happened to Jews in Europe. As happened to people of color in the USA. As happened to the aboriginal peoples in Canada. As happened to…

The life of Jesus is about advocacy. It is about solidarity.

The Lasting Supper is a safe place of solidarity and advocacy. I invite you to join us.

About David Hayward

David Hayward runs the blog nakedpastor as a graffiti artist on the walls of religion where he critiques religion… specifically Christianity and the church. He also runs the online community The Lasting Supper where people can help themselves discover, explore and live in spiritual freedom.

  • Andy

    Did Jesus also shed his blood for that cake shop owner in Oregon? Or the wedding photographer in New Mexico?

  • Brigitte Mueller

    Yes, yes, but was it also for your sin, David? Or is it always about the sins of others. If nobody is looking at himself, we will all be advocates for something and reconcile nothing.

  • http://religiouscomics.net/ Jeff P

    Hey Brigitte, I see we now get to associate a face with your comments. :)

  • http://demiurgiclust.net shelly

    Way to miss the point.

  • http://demiurgiclust.net shelly

    Point missed.

  • http://demiurgiclust.net shelly

    I love how the two initial replies to this cartoon COMPLETELY miss the point of it.

    Christianity constantly marginalizes people — people of colour, LGBTQ+, the poor, women, the disabled (mentally and physically), and so on — which is the antithesis of what Jesus said (“whatever you do to the least of these, you do to me”). The point isn’t that Jesus didn’t die for the privileged (he did!). The point is that, during his life, he constantly called out the privileged and sided with the marginalized, and he continued to side with the marginalized (hell, he BECAME marginalized himself!) while being crucified. So by asking “What about (insert group of Christians who exhibit heterosexist behaviour, which makes a mockery of their Saviour, here)?”, you’re deflecting the issue, you’re siding with the privileged, and making a mockery of your Saviour in the process. You’re focused on the speck while ignoring the plank.

  • BHG

    Actually, His story is about God become man to reconcile man to God. ALL men, even the ones who crucified Him. Reducing the passion to a tale of political or social or societal solidarity and advocacy is indeed to miss the point.

  • http://nakedpastor.com/ nakedpastor

    I agree Shell. Great comment!

  • klhayes

    Preach on, Shelly!

  • klhayes

    It’s ALL about the sins of others for many Christians. They want others to live like them so much that they forget to live like they claim to believe. I am not sure if it is for fear that their faith is so weak they will go astray or to get a notch on their halo and say “look, I saved somebody!”

  • klhayes

    They were the Christians marginalizing others.

  • Cecilia Davidson

    . <- the point

    O <- your head

  • Cecilia Davidson

    Point missed entirely.

  • JosephBrown660

    Jesus died for all the sins of mankind. To access His saving grace, one must acknowledge their sin, confess it and turn from it (repent). If one stubbornly clings to their sin or refuses to acknowledge that their lifestyle is sinful, they face an uncertain eternity.

  • BHG

    Different point, I think, rather than just missed. The discussion and the blog, as it stands, I think miss something vital and risks Christianity’s deteriorating into something merely political and social rather than eternal and salvific. Thanks for a discussion rather than just a three-word put down. I appreciate conversation.

    I was not responding to the cartoon but to the commentary that stated: “… his story is one of solidarity with those who are labeled, marginalized and persecuted because of who or what they are.”

    We too often confuse who we are with what we do. Who we are should never be marginalized; what we do can—and should—be the subject of discourse for what we do may lead us to Christ or away. Not all our choices are good ones, not all our actions, even when deeply desired and fully committed, lead us to God or enhance our true selves.

    My point is that it is important not to confuse the reason for the Incarnation with the way we see it playing out in our lives and I thought the comment I highlighted above did just that. Christ did indeed become poor that we might become rich, and was marginalized that we might not confuse His power with earthly power. Indeed, we are all poor in different ways and it is only in poverty and helplessness, however we encounter them, that we encounter Christ and can be changed by Him.

    Certainly temporal solidarity with the poor and marginalized is a necessary result of encountering Christ and we all fall short. St. Basil, for instance, wrote that if we have two coats in our closet, one belongs to the poor with all the action that implies. I surely don’t meet that standard but my encounter with Christ leads me to move closer to it, even if by nanometers as I grow in faith and grace.

    Poverty and wealth can then become the venue in which redemption once accepted leads to a working out of salvation for both the giver of the cloak and the recipient, done within the life of grace. Solidarity is not, properly understood, a merely unilateral act; it should always be reciprocal and call people into relationship. The wealthy in solidarity with the poor in
    their poverty; the poor in solidarity with the wealthy in theirs.

    Because commenting on the cartoon seems the done thing, here’s my additional thought and perhaps it will connect my earlier comment with what I meant to convey. Certainly there are those who are wrongly excluded from the Church because of who they are or are perceived to be and for anyone to do so is to sin. It is an incredibly poverty of spirit (a poverty worse than financial poverty, I think) to deny the dignity
    and worth of anyone; to say, for example, “You are not welcome in this
    community because you are attracted to people of the same sex.” It is
    beyond mere poverty to persecute people for who they are.

    But it is an equal poverty of spirit to remove oneself from the Church community because it calls one to abandon, for example, a life of serial heterosexual adultery through divorce and remarriage, and then to claim that one is excluded–and that happens too. In the former situation, one rejects a person; in the latter, our behavior in response to the call of grace is at issue. Christ calls us into His Church to bring us closer to Him and that requires all of us to give up those things and behaviors that separate us from Him, whatever they may be. And giving them up is painful–that’s why He called it a cross.

    The blog is interesting and makes a good point; I merely wanted to point out that without the balance of remembering that the reason for the Incarnation is the salvation of souls, not merely the alleviation of temporal injustices the call to solidarity too often deteriorates to a social and political agenda colored more by what we wish to do with our lives than by who we are and are created to be—and that is NOT the reason for the Incarnation. Not recognizing that, not keeping that central, risks imbalance just as bad in the opposite direction: accepting people where they are but not calling them to move closer to Christ; distorting Christ from Redeemer to mere community activist and organizer. Clearly, I didn’t do a very good job.

    Yes, Christ came to be the friend and defender of the poor and marginalized! Thanks be to God! But it is well to remember that not only did He interpose his body (which these days is the Church–something to think about and quite in line with the blog’s point) between the woman caught in adultery and the mob out to persecute her quite literally to death, He also turned to her and said, “Go and sin no more.” Both/and.

    Last of all, perhaps it helps to remember not to confuse individual Christians with Christianity. It wasn’t accidental that Chesterton said that Christianity has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and therefore has not been tried. If Christianity marginalizes the disabled, why are there so many Christian communities for them such as L’Arche and Mustard Seeds? If it marginalizes people of color, why is the Africa-American Church so vibrant? If it marginalizes women, why are the leaders “on the ground” in so many churches women? If it marginalizes the poor, why are there so many Christian charities doing such great work to alleviate poverty?

    I am truly sorry if I gave offense; I did not intend to. To assume I have a plank in my eye is a valid assumption but I think I have something of value to contribute to the conversation even so. I should have been more complete in my comment, I suppose. Maybe this helps clarify.

  • Gary

    “If one stubbornly clings to their sin or refuses to acknowledge that their lifestyle is sinful, they face an uncertain eternity.”

    What you are in essence saying here is that if someone “refuses to acknowledge that their lifestyle” has been declared by YOU to be sinful.

  • JosephBrown660

    I know you vehemently disagree but according to the Bible God calls it a sin. Take up with him not me. I am just following what Holy Scripture states.

  • Gary

    Why should I take it up with God? It is you I disagree with…not God. The bible has been badly polluted on this topic and honest exegesis proves this. You simply choose to deny and close your mind in order to cling to your bigotry. God is bigger than the bible, and thankfully He is even bigger than your bigotry.

  • Gary

    And of course the irony is that MAN created the bible, but GOD created homosexuals. This means that it is actually YOU who needs to “take it up with him”.

    LOL

  • Brigitte Mueller

    Many, many places we have Christians as the marginalized people, in prison for their faith, poor, rejected, women, children, people of color, etc. What equates “Christian” with “privileged”?

  • http://religiouscomics.net/ Jeff P

    Religion is like a stick used to beat other people into line. In dominant Christian areas, Christianity (and the bible) is used to keep people in line (or in their place) and sometimes includes the persecution of those with differing minority views. In areas with another religion in dominance, that other religion (and its holy writings) is used to keep people in line and “in their place” and sometimes includes the persecution of those with minority views including Christians. That is just how religion works. It is a tool among others that people use to beat up on other people who are a little bit different.

    For example, Christianity says “You should do this and this and never that and that and believe this and this and never that and that all because it is written in the bible and these writings come from God and if you don’t do and believe these things, you are an awful person and God will see to it that you burn in Hell for all eternity.”

    Yes, that is a pretty big stick.

  • JosephBrown660

    I believe that the Bible IS God’s inspired Word. Please enlighten me as to how is the Bible polluted? Seeing that you are so much of an expert, what other areas are also affected. Is Jesus the Son of God? Did he conquer death? If you are such an authority cite some examples of where an honest exegesis proves that homosexual behavior is not an abominable, sinful act. I breathlessly await your scholarly, expletive laced submission. Given that you are such an expert, please point to your scholarly works.

  • Gary

    You can spare me your condescending and arrogant attack. We have been down this road before and the sources have been provided and there are countless more examples of biblical scholars coming to the same conclusion. Fact is many Christian denominations are coming to the same conclusion. Those claiming biblical justification for their homosexual bigotry are finding themselves ever more in the minority and will soon be relegated to nutjob status just like those still clinging to their biblical justifications for misogyny and racial prejudice.

    How is the bible polluted? Open your eyes man and look. The word homosexual was not even in our english bibles until 1946 and in the passages where it is used , the greek equivalents were NEVER used. Still, if you clammer for more sources I’ll provide another…though your mind is clearly so muddled with arrogance and your heart so full of contempt rather than love…it will likely have no chance of penetrating your thick skull.

    http://www.hrmcc.org/Resources/StudyDocuments/bibleand.htm

    Oh…and since you seem to really like my expletives I should try not to disappoint you. If you are only going to attack don’t bother…you can really just fuck off.

  • JosephBrown660

    Gary, You surprised me…only one f bomb! What has happened to you? Is the “f” key broken on your computer? Give me a break, are you that thick skulled to think that just because the word homosexuality did not appear until 1946 that the Word of God was changed then to accommodate it. No, the reprehensible act of homosexuality was addressed in more graphic terms in the Bible in all versions since it was inspired. Nice try.
    Thank you for the link to a biased source. Would you like links to other more credible sources?
    Have a nice day! Always nice corresponding to a calm sincere progressive such as you.

  • JosephBrown660

    That is the epicenter of our disagreement. I believe the Bible is inspired by God. You don’t.

  • Brigitte Mueller

    Someone is always keeping people in line, even if it is simply the law, the state or the police, all legal entities that we have to keep society functioning. If it is the voluntary participation in religion, then you have certain expectations of moral behavior. If you don’t like it or believe it you can quit, except for in Islam, where then you deserve temporal death, as well as eternal damnation. Better to be kept in line by teachings than threats of violence, prison, terrorism, death. David can produce his cartoons because he lives in a free, western (Christian-ish) society and because he does not aim them at Islam or despots.

  • Gary

    You are a hoot. I am not sure what your obsession with profanity is all about…but frankly is speaks of a small mind. As does your continued defense of bigotry.

  • Gary

    Actually your statement is (once again) a misrepresentation. You do not just claim that the bible is “inspired” (I also believe some of it is inspired) but rather that it “IS God’s inspired Word”, a point in which we do strongly disagree.

    The “Word” is clearly defined in the bible…and the bible ain’t it. LOL

  • JosephBrown660

    We will have to agree to disagree. Good luck with your erroneous beliefs. Remember they do carry with them eternal consequences.

  • JosephBrown660

    I do because the Bible, God’s Holy inspired Word encourages believers to avoid profanity and vulgarity. Something you seem to ignore.

  • Gary

    You seem to believe that only sources which agree with you are credible, and all that disagree with you are biased. This may help you maintain your beliefs in a flat Earth (oh wait…you believe in bigotry. I always get those two confused) but it will do nothing for the pursuit of truth. Which is why fundamentalists are not typically drawn to truth but instead seek to closed mindedly defend their dogma at any cost.

  • Gary

    That’s right. Throw your boogeyman god beliefs at me. If I don’t agree with you he will zap me, or roast me, or whatever the hell you think is the proper punishment for not agreeing with you.

    LMFAO

    Get a grip…such lame threats are truly for the simple minded. They lost their affect on me many years ago.

  • Gary

    Uhm…NOPE…wrong again. (Save me the proof text ripped out of context…been there, done that)

    I still have not figured out why the FUCK you keep hanging out in here.

  • http://religiouscomics.net/ Jeff P

    “…they do carry with them eternal consequences.” Says you and what God? I can dream up a God that says something different. I can also write down the stuff I dream up and call it scripture and point to it like you like to point to the scripture that you believe in. No real difference. It is all just human words and ideas. No one knows if there is an afterlife. All we can see with our eyes (and smell with our noses) is the decay of the flesh and the wishful thinking of those that remain. It would be nice to have an afterlife but just because something would be nice and just because people long ago wrote down what they thought about that nice idea doesn’t make that the way it will happen.

  • Cecilia Davidson

    Too often, any time that those who aren’t white or Protestant or straight or cisgender aren’t treated with the same respect as those who ARE, all in the name of preaching Jesus’ message or when it’s called out by others and the persecutors claim freedom of religion, Christian is equated with Privileged

  • http://religiouscomics.net/ Jeff P

    Yes, but nevertheless, many Christians would say that David is going to burn in hell and many more say that I will burn in hell. The message behind Christianity is not quite as lovey dovey as you seem to imply. There are real psychological threats involved for those who believe the doctrine. Fortunately I don’t but I still must be careful in what I say to people so as not to be shunned and ostracized.

  • Brigitte Mueller

    We are all going to die, or perish. And if we don’t look to forgiveness, we all die in our sins. It is not a very pretty picture, period.

  • http://demiurgiclust.net shelly

    In the US — or even in the West in general — Christians ARE the privileged.

  • Tom Estes

    Yea, Jesus would advocate for the very sodomites he destroyed in the Old Testament. This blog is anything but Christian.

  • DoctorDJ

    Oh, the poor, poor christians.

    They love to wear the martyr label.

  • DoctorDJ

    Verily, you’re right!

    If by christian you mean homophobic neanderthals.

  • Gary

    There’s that boogeyman trying to sneak in here again. Watch out everyone…he is looking for people to gobble up.

  • Gary

    Yes and he killed Lot’s wife for simply looking back upon the destruction. Now doesn’t that sound like a god of love?

    It has taken a long time to come to the point I can say that much of the OT is the ramblings of a superstitious people…and I am a believer. But the lack of questioning what is obvious myth makes us imbeciles.

  • Cecilia Davidson

    Oh COME NOW. You’ve been far more aggressive than any of us have been.

  • Cecilia Davidson

    If anything, this blog IS Christian. Christ had a term for people like you -

    PHARISEE.

  • JosephBrown660

    It is not about agreeing with me it is about reconciling to God.
    You must be a real swell guy to be around. If someone disagrees with you, you flip out start dropping F bombs to no end. It seems like you cannot engage in mature conversation without resorting to condescending remarks.

  • JosephBrown660

    You are a believer….in what? You should ask yourself what you believe in. Certainly not the inspired, living Word of God.

  • JosephBrown660

    You have to go back a bit to see how Gary flips out. He could not drop enough F bombs in prior exchanges.

  • Cecilia Davidson

    The harping on swearing means you have no argument.

  • Gary

    I am reconciled to God. I do not need your approval. I do not care if you think otherwise. Pretty simple stuff actually.

    As for the complete bullshit of your following remark…

    “It seems like you cannot engage in mature conversation without resorting to condescending remarks.”

    …you have got to be kidding. LMAO Let me quote you some of your “condescending remarks” you have thrown at me.

    “Seeing that you are so much of an expert…”
    “If you are such an authority…”
    “I breathlessly await your scholarly, expletive laced submission. Given that you are such an expert, please point to your scholarly works.”

    Seriously dude…you are totally cracking me up.

  • Gary

    I love a good “F bomb” when the situation calls for it.

    It mostly calls for it when dealing with rabid fundamentalists like yourself.

  • Gary

    No…I most certainly do not believe the bible is “the inspired, living Word of God”. But I am in good company…because God does not believe that either.

  • Cecilia Davidson

    There’s being a rabid fundamentalist, and then there’s being an ass. i have friends who are rabid fundamentalists but understand that there are things we’ll never agree on. They understand this and we don’t harp on each other – we try to love the other to the best of our ability.
    These friends of mine also understand that one can be ecstatic about their faith without needing to deride others.

  • Gary

    Good point and I agree (Especially with the ass part…lol) But my qualifier of “rabid” is my attempt to point out where they differ from basic fundamentalists. Your friends may be fundies…but I would submit that they are not “rabid” (irrationally extreme). I have friends like that as well.

  • Cecilia Davidson

    It would seem that you aren’t here under genuine pretenses, Joseph. Trolls should be ignored and cast aside like the rude guests invited to the banquet.

  • Cecilia Davidson

    I use rabid very broadly, myself, but I still think there’s a step beyond -

    Trolling.

  • Cecilia Davidson

    I’m afraid you are wrong to say anyone has erroneous beliefs. All beliefs are valid (if not always sound) and important to the believer – it’s when poor action is taken that the eternal consequences should be brought up.

    David will not like my doing this, but you, sir, need to leave Patheos if your soul point is to be an ass.

  • Brigitte Mueller

    How are they privileged, Shelly?–??? Do they not live under the same laws as everyone else?– I have lived in the West my entire life, but never in the US, which seems to be a special case in some ways, and fail to see my privileged position. My family were refugees. I myself am an immigrant. My husband and I could not have children and we adopted. My mother died when I was in my teens. My son died when he was 18 in a car accident. We have studied, lived and worked like anyone else. Except on Sundays we go to church and participate in a local community. This is indeed a privilege and a blessing, but I don’t think what you are talking about.

  • Cecilia Davidson

    Have you bothered to read how many stories there are of transgender men and women being killed and the killers, quite often, getting away with the act?

  • Gary

    Yes very good point.


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