Quoting Quiverfull: So the Pilgrims Were Quiverfull Patriarch Types?

QUOTING QUIVERFULL is a regular feature of NLQ – we present the actual words of noted Quiverfull leaders and ask our readers: What do you think? Agree? Disagree? This is the place to state your opinion. Please, let’s keep it respectful – but at the same time, we encourage readers to examine the ideas of Quiverfull honestly and thoughtfully.

From the Vision Forum and Doug Phillip’s blog – November 21, 2012

If you only read from one book other than the Bible this Thanksgiving, make it Of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford. And if you only have time for one chapter, make sure it is the fourth. It is in this chapter that we learn about the true reasons why these homeschooling Pilgrims debated over whether or not they should risk their lives to go to America, the ultimate reasons for their departure (including concern over bad peer influences with their children), and their tremendous confidence in God. Most importantly, it is here that you read of Bradford’s multi-generational vision of victory.

the ideas of Quiverfull honestly and thoughtfully.

From the Vision Forum and Doug Phillip’s blog – November 21, 2012

 If you only read from one book other than the Bible this Thanksgiving, make it Of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford. And if you only have time for one chapter, make sure it is the fourth. It is in this chapter that we learn about the true reasons why these homeschooling Pilgrims debated over whether or not they should risk their lives to go to America, the ultimate reasons for their departure (including concern over bad peer influences with their children), and their tremendous confidence in God. Most importantly, it is here that you read of Bradford’s multi-generational vision of victory.

 

Comments open below

NLQ Recommended Reading …

Breaking Their Will: Shedding Light on Religious Child Maltreatment‘ by Janet Heimlich

Quivering Daughters‘ by Hillary McFarland

Quiverfull: Inside the Christian Patriarchy Movement‘ by Kathryn Joyce

 

About Suzanne Calulu
  • Laura

    Here’s the text. As he says, they were conflicted about leaving but thought they had to, to have a better life for themselves and for their children.

    I see the part about peers, but before that is this:

    Thirdly; as necessitie was a taskrnaster over them, so they were forced to be such, not only to their servants, but in a sorte, to their dearest children; the which as it did not a litle wound the tender harts of niany a loving father and mother, so it produced likwise sundrie sad and sorowful effects. For many of their children, that were of best dispositions and gracious inclinations, haveing lernde to bear the yoake in their youth, and willing to bear parte of their parents burden, were, often times, so oppressed with their hevie labours, that though their minds were free and willing, yet their bodies bowed under the weight of the same, and became decreped in their early youth; the vigor of nature? being consumed in the very budd as it were.

    We seem to have skipped over this part.

  • http://calulu.blogspot.com Calulu

    The point that struck me is that Doug Phillips (why do I always want to write ‘Dough’ for his name?) and others in the QF realm love to rewrite history to fit what they think it should be. He obviously skips over much of their history, including that under Puritan rule in the US half or more of the babies were conceived outside of marriage, the whole notion of ‘Bundling’ courting (how’d you like to see Patriarch courtship included Bundling? he he) and the fact that they were nothing like what Phillips thinks they were like. Home Schooling? Many people did that at the time, it was more normal than not, but trying to link it to their own heritage is a bit much just like saying that the Pilgrims were trying to keep their kids free from worldly influences.

  • Sandy

    Calulu, where did you get that fact about over half of the babies under Puritan rule were conceived after marriage? I know that in Scotland at the time that babies were conceived after wedlock before marriage. What is the book or link, please. this interests me.

  • Saraquill

    Try D’Emilio, John and Estelle Friedman eds.1997. Intimate Matters: A History of Sexuality in America London: University of Chicago Press. Full history of sex and the family from the British colonies onwards.

  • http://calulu.blogspot.com Calulu

    I got it from a book called “Legends, Lies and Cherished Myths of American History” by Rick Shenckman IIRC. My husband usually will pick up the odd history or factoid book for me when he’s out and about and sees one that looks interesting.

    Now I know the Patriarchal will say that Shenkman is wrong but he’s a Harvard grad who’s now a professor at George Mason and frequently called in to appear on CNN, Fox and MSNBC news.

  • Persephone

    It’s a very sad passage. The parents felt bad about what they did to their children and servants, and it describes the breaking down of the children under the strain. How can they exalt that? The parents didn’t exult in this treatment, and their children weren’t breaking down because they were being beaten regularly with plumbing line. How sick they are to treat this sadness this way.

    They also left out that the Pilgrims worked on a socialist basis, to protect and the old and ill and orphans, in an effort to save everyone possible through the hard times.

  • Cathy W

    …and also that public schooling was established early on in New England – a law from 1647 required every town of 50 families to have an elementary school for both boys and girls and every town of 100 families to have a secondary school for the boys, and even the towns that weren’t big enough to require a school tried to have one anyways… You want extensive homeschooling, you need to look at the South, where the rich had private tutors and everyone else could maybe read enough to puzzle through the Bible.


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