Quoting Quiverfull: College Illusion?

Jenny Chancey from Ladies Against Feminism – January 26, 2013

We’ve been saying for years that the brick-and-mortar model was outdated and would go the way of the dodo. We’ve been mocked and misquoted and told we’re trying to prevent women from getting an education, when that’s absolutely not the case. We’re just in favor of a real education that doesn’t involve a lifetime of debt repayment and brainwashing in leftist philosophies. Now we’re finding more and more articles in mainstream publications and on education blogs that are dismissing the idea of the four-year campus-centered model of higher education.

Comments open below

QUOTING QUIVERFULL is a regular feature of NLQ – we present the actual words of noted Quiverfull leaders and ask our readers: What do you think? Agree? Disagree? This is the place to state your opinion. Please, let’s keep it respectful – but at the same time, we encourage readers to examine the ideas of Quiverfull honestly and thoughtfully.

NLQ Recommended Reading …

Breaking Their Will: Shedding Light on Religious Child Maltreatment‘ by Janet Heimlich

Quivering Daughters‘ by Hillary McFarland

Quiverfull: Inside the Christian Patriarchy Movement‘ by Kathryn Joyce

 

 

About Suzanne Calulu
  • chervil

    “We’re just in favor of a real education that doesn’t involve a lifetime of debt repayment and brainwashing in leftist philosophies. ”

    Well OK then, Jenny, it’s a real win-win, isn’t it. If your kids stay home, then our kids have more opportunities for the type of education we like and you hate, it just opens up more space for them. I don’t see a problem with that. It works both ways, if your kids are better off at home, I’m less worried about my kids having to interact on a daily basis with judgmental Christianists like Jenny and her crackpot ideas on creationism, gender roles, biblical cherry picking, cognitive dissonance and blatant lies and smears.

    My daughter is heading to school soon, we’ve already had this discussion a few times.

  • http://concerningpurity.blogspot.com Lynn

    I don’t have a problem with people foregoing the 4-year college model of education in favor of something different that will meet their specific needs. And there are plenty of schools out there that aren’t as liberal as many of the major universities. But I suspect the author’s definition of a *real* education is not an education at all, but some kind of training to be a housewife. That, I’m not okay with.

  • RodeoBob

    We’re just in favor of a real education that doesn’t involve a lifetime of debt repayment and brainwashing in leftist philosophies
    (emphasis mine)
    Nice attempted misdirection there, especially since the articles they link approvingly to are only about debt repayment and not about ideology. What does one have to do with the other? Absolutely nothing.

    It’s a bit like saying “For years I’ve been in favor of high-efficiency light bulbs and a velociraptor-free home, and I was mocked and opposed for it! But now, people are coming around. Look at these articles on compact fluorescent light bulbs!”

    The mockery and resistance have nothing to do with the former, and everything to do with the latter…

  • chervil

    lol, RodeoBob. Well said. +1 Internet.

  • Nea

    None of these things are like the other. (RodeoBob has a great analogy.) Mainstream media is discussing 4 years vs. 2 years; actual campus vs. virtual campus; rising prices. These have nothing at all to do with ideology and only a little to do with each other. Throwing them all together is like comparing apples to oranges to kiwi fruit and then saying “My beliefs are better!”

    And the bit about brainwashing makes me giggle, considering that we all know that what they really mean by “real education” is to wash brains in *their* brand of detergent.

  • http://calulu.blogspot.com Calulu

    It’s so hypocritical on their part. They say they homeschool so that their children will get a better education with one-on-one learning that cannot take place in a public or private school classroom because of the student to teacher ratio. Yet once they’ve educated their children to the limits of their own teaching then that need for superior education becomes something demonized. You can’t have it both ways, either you’re in favor of education or you aren’t but don’t play games about it and pretend that it’s not because you cannot control what your k id is exposed to. It’s all about control.
    Granted, higher education is expensive but there are different ways to go about paying for it. While not everyone necessarily needs a college degree, at the very least if you want your children to have legitimate jobs and be able to support themselves as adults you would want them to have some sort of post-high school training. This isn’t the 1800s where a man could go west, get a plot of land from the government and homestead farm. Hell, it’s not even the 1950s when you didn’t need an advanced education to make a decent living in manufacturing or working on an assembly line. The world has changed, QF refuses to adapt to that fact so as a result their children will be left behind in this economy without some sort of training or education. So nice of you to limit your kid before he/she has a chance.

  • saraquill

    Since their children are expected to provide grandchildren and teach them at home, I’m saddened and disturbed at the diminishing returns of education that this form of thinking creates.

  • teachergirl

    Here is a list of those who went to college: Jennie and Matt Chauncey, Kelly Crawford from Generation Cedar, Gil and Kelly Bates, the Botkin parents, the Phillips parents and the Brown patriarch ( father of Kelly Bradrick, Blair Tsantles and Daid Brown from the NCFIC.) These people are hypocrites plain and simple. They deny their children the very opportunities they had and it is sad. Of course they state they wont go to college, who would raise their multitudes of blessings?

  • Nea

    Diminishing education, but it’s *great* for keeping people within the cult!

  • heather134

    I love my university and the idea that it is evil or brainwashing offends me.
    Also teachergirl,I’m sorry, I actually like the Bates better than most of those families and at least one of their daughters is attending college

  • Stacey B.

    That whole quote reeks of hypocrisy.

  • Meggie

    My husband is a lecturer at a medical university. He does not brainwash his students in leftist philosophies – they are taught how to be doctors, nurses, physios, dentists, pharmacists, etc. Hubby really doesn’t care what his students believe in terms of religion or politics, as long as they get their chemistry correct. As far as debt goes, the $10,000 – $15,000 debt most students finish with really shouldn’t be too much of a problem for people who will earn 6 figure incomes.

  • Nea

    Y’know, one of the things that gets yelled at me when I work as an abortion clinic escort is “God sent a child to cure cancer and you aborted it!” I always want to yell back “God sent a child to cure cancer and you told her she had to skip college and stay home with the babies!”

  • Tori

    Nea – do it! And also, more power to you for the important and hard job you do. You are giving these women support at a very difficult time, made more difficult by these assholes.

  • Nea

    One of the lessons they hammer in training is to counter-protest on our own time, not during a shift. Although I have immense respect for the escorts who go down and let the protesters preach at them directly – many a woman has slipped by unnoticed while protesters are trying to save a “deathscort’s” soul.

  • http://existingbetween.wordpress.com/ Joy F

    Until people actually read the statistics college grads 3.7 unemployment, and even so with high hireabilty within 12 months. Recent stats debunk the naysayers in education, yet these myths keep getting perpetuated.


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