Quoting Quiverfull: The Instruction Business?

by Jay Younts of Shepherd Press  - “Fathers are in the instruction business”

Fathers are in the instruction business–the business of instructing their children to live obediently for the glory of God. Our culture has come to scoff at and even disdain this notion. Parents, and fathers in particular, are seen more as caregivers than as leaders charged with the responsibility of building lives.

Words like leadership and accountability don’t sit well in today’s politically correct world. In this world everything must be done for the child in order to serve the child. According to this view, parents must provide care for their children while being careful not to contaminate their minds with stuff about authority and religion.

If fathers are relegated to the role of caregiver, then someone else has to be responsible to teach children how to think about their world. Sound far-fetched? It has already happened. The state has taken upon itself the authority to redefine the institution of marriage.

Thankfully, God’s command regarding the role of fathers has not changed. God has charged fathers with the responsibility to raise their children in the training and instruction of the Lord (Ephesians 6:4). Mothers and fathers are not primarily caregivers. They are the holy representatives of the God of Creation to their children. The father’s authority is not authority that has been given to him by the state. The father’s authority is mandated by God and derived from God.

Churches must rise again to actively promote the role of the father as the leader of the family. Husbands and wives form the distinct union of being one-flesh. Fathers function in that union to embrace the responsibility of instructing their children about the world. The gospel is the central component of this instruction. Presenting the gospel requires that the reality of sin must be clearly incorporated into daily instruction. This means that the reality of a Savior to whom all men must turn to escape punishment must also be a daily part of a child’s instruction.

Comments open below

 

QUOTING QUIVERFULL is a regular feature of NLQ – we present the actual words of noted Quiverfull leaders and ask our readers: What do you think? Agree? Disagree? This is the place to state your opinion. Please, let’s keep it respectful – but at the same time, we encourage readers to examine the ideas of Quiverfull honestly and thoughtfully.

NLQ Recommended Reading …

Breaking Their Will: Shedding Light on Religious Child Maltreatment‘ by Janet Heimlich

Quivering Daughters‘ by Hillary McFarland

Quiverfull: Inside the Christian Patriarchy Movement‘ by Kathryn Joyce

 

About Suzanne Calulu
  • Desley Noneofyerbiz

    “Husbands and wives form the distinct union of being one-flesh. Fathers function in that union to embrace the responsibility of instructing their children about the world.”

    O.K. Since the function of instructing children in the one-flesh union is father-specific, what exactly is the function of the mother in this union?

  • NeaDods

    The state has taken upon itself the authority to redefine the institution of marriage.

    Which does not in any way stop a man from teaching his kids that their religion believes differently and that their views are not shared by the state.

  • http://biblicalpersonhood.wordpress.com/ Retha Faurie

    If fathers are supposed to be in the instructing business, why is most home schooling done by mothers? Should it not be the mother who works for money and the father who home school, under that paradigm?

  • http://biblicalpersonhood.wordpress.com/ Retha Faurie

    “According to this view, parents must provide care for their children while being careful not to contaminate their minds with stuff about authority and religion.If fathers are relegated to the role of caregiver, then someone else has to be responsible to teach children how to think about their world. ” – Jay Younts

    It is interesting that the first of only two things he mention that parents should speak about, but which the goverment (in his opinion) opposes, is authority. Human authority over other humans is really not that big a part of Christianity, the word authority related to humans over others appears in the NT only a few times, and only 4 times related to a command – thrice to say believers should not exercise authority over other believers, once to say Titus should teach with authority (which does not mean he can order around, but that his words will be authorative). (Women having authority over their own heads – not “a sign of” authority, those words are an insertion into the English Bible – is not authority over others.)

    “God has charged fathers with the responsibility to raise their children in the training and instruction of the Lord (Ephesians 6:4).” -JY

    Actually, that same Greek word is translated “parents” elsewhere in the Bible. And “raising them in the training and instruction of the Lord” does not mean the father should be the one instructing (teaching). God gives tasks according to gifts, some in the church have teaching gifts, and God calls the church to make people (children are people) His disciples and teach them. A father could raise his children “in the training and instruction of the Lord” if he isn’t spiritually mature enough or don’t have a teaching gift – by ensuring they are taught by those who have the gift.

    “Churches must rise again to actively promote the role of the father as the leader of the family.” -JY

    The Bible never say the man should be the leader of the family, nor the head of the family. http://biblicalpersonhood.wordpress.com/2012/10/27/how-ofte-does-the-bible-say-men-should-be-the-heads-of-their-households/


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