Not Quoting Quiverfull: Where Does Parenting Responsibility End?

Have you been following the Rachel Canning situation in the news? Rachel is an 18 year old senior in New Jersey that has been living at a friend’s home since her birthday and is now suing her parents for private school tuition, living expenses and to force her parents to pay for her upcoming college education.

While the Rachel Canning law suit isn’t a case of Quiverfull or Evangelical or Homeschooling issues it could well have long term affect that impacts all three of those worlds of parenting. The judge decided today that Miss Canning’s parents are not legally culpable for tuition to her Catholic high school and the other issues are deferred to a later court date.

The case could have an impact on parenting, both by secular parents and those in the religious world depending on the final verdict. Could it be possible that parents might be held to paying for a college education for any of their children if they have the money?

Judge Peter Bogaard warned that her suit could lead to a “slippery slope”, asking: “Are we going to open the gates for 12-year-olds to sue for an Xbox? For 13-year-olds to sue for an iPhone?”

All day today the debate over the issues brought forward by the law suit has raged. People are divided over this, some saying Rachel is a victim of parental abuse and should be compensated accordingly because her family threw her out. The flip side is that this high school cheerleader and honor student left her parents home because she didn’t want a curfew and rules.

My question tonight is if a parent’s responsibility financially for a child should end when that child turns legal age? Where do you line up on this issue? It’s a tough one.

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NLQ Recommended Reading …

Breaking Their Will: Shedding Light on Religious Child Maltreatment‘ by Janet Heimlich

Quivering Daughters‘ by Hillary McFarland

Quiverfull: Inside the Christian Patriarchy Movement‘ by Kathryn Joyce

 

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