The Puritans, The Quakers and Little Old Me (Reflections on ‘A Measure of Light’)

by Virginia Knowles cross posted from her blog Watch The ShepherdA couple of weeks ago, a new novel mentioned on Facebook piqued my interest. I ordered it almost immediately. A Measure of Light, by bestselling Canadian author Beth Powning, retells the story of Mary Dyer, an English woman who came to Massachusetts as a persecuted Puritan, yet later became one of the earliest American Quakers.My mind always seeks connections between what I read and my own life and family, and this was an immediate grab for me. One of my ancestors, Margaret Stevenson Scott, was the last and oldest person hanged by the Puritans in the Salem … [Read more...]

Religious Child Abuse: An Unending Source of Sadness

by M. Dolon Hickmon author of the book '13:24 - A Story of Faith and Obsession'In addition to supernatural benefits, religions often promise what amounts to a program of self-improvement. Ingredients may include prayer, studying scripture and attending regular meetings. Such paths often also call for personal sacrifice, whether in the form of tithes and offerings or through performing unpaid labor such as proselytizing door-to-door. For their efforts, the faithful are promised an array of tangible and intangible remunerations: health and wealth, relief of depression or anxiety, eternal life and so forth. For many, one particularly alluring promise is that of a fool-proof formula for … [Read more...]

‘Radical’ Review : 1 – 22

by Samantha Field cross posted from her blog Samantha P Field.comThe first time I heard about David Platt’s Radical: Taking Back Your Faith from the American Dream, I was in my second year of graduate school. It had been out for over a year at that point, and a colleague I worked with recommended it to me after a conversation we’d had about the corruption and greed common in American evangelicalism. This book had left a lasting impression on my friend, but I wasn’t as struck by it as he was. … [Read more...]

The Importance of Dying Well

by Suzanne TitkemeyerAbout three weeks ago I received a book for review on the subject of dying. The book, "Peaceful Passages: A Hospice Nurse's Stories of Dying Well" written by Janet Wehr, was a fascinating one. Not necessarily a religious book or even a Christian book, but an inspired and moving account of the journey from life into death. I could not put the book down, finishing it in a few scant days. … [Read more...]

Blame it on the Smurfs – Post-Tramatic Church Syndrome

by Suzanne TitkemeyerWhen I first cracked open my copy of Reba Riley's book, Post-Tramatic Church Syndrome I wasn't entirely sure what to expect. I figured it might be much like many of the series we feature here on No Longer Quivering: Girl/boy is immersed in a Quiverfull/Fundamentalist/Evangelical church and leaves for a long laundry list of reasons with a heavy burden of spiritual abuse and a heaping helping of depression only to be heckled/harassed/hounded by those well-meaning 'Good Christians' left behind. Usually the woman/man has a long road of healing with lots of twists, turns and tears before coming to a place that works on all levels for them. A sadder but wiser person. … [Read more...]

NLQ Review: The Paranormal Conspiracy: The Truth About Ghosts, Aliens and Mysterious Beings

by Suzanne TitkemeyerOkay NLQers. I know this book has not much to do with what we talk about here at No Longer Quivering, but bear with me. It does in the sense that it was written by Timothy Dailey of the Moody Bible Institute and he works at, surprise, surprise, Josh Duggar's former employer - The Family Research Council. This is another book review for Patheos.~~~~~~~~~After reading The Paranormal Conspiracy: The Truth About Ghosts, Aliens and Mysterious Beings by Dr. Timothy Dailey one thing stood out to me in glaring neon - Boy, that tricky Satan is one very busy fellow with hoofs stuck in all sorts of pies. In fact, that is the main point of the entire book, anything that … [Read more...]

Jane Eyre’s Sisters – NLQ Book Review

by Suzanne TitkemeyerJane Eyre's Sisters: How Women Live and Write the Heroine's Story by Jody Gentian BowerI have to admit, I wasn't sure what this book was going to be about beyond how women write about the lives of other women from classic literature. If the focus had been only on the lives of women writers and the influence of society on their writings from the time of Jane Austen I would have been well satisfied. But this book was far richer in scope, opening up to me critical thinking about women, our roles in family, society and life. … [Read more...]

NLQ Book Review: The Hand on the Mirror

by Suzanne TitkemeyerWhen Patheos was asking for people to review 'The Hand on the Mirror: A True Story of Life Beyond Death' by Janis Heaphy Durham I was intrigued by the subject matter. In my years at my old church I'd participated in many a house cleansing and the occasional exorcism. Particularly interested after a few experiences I've had after beloved pets passed and something that happened during my vacation last summer  I became even more interested in the idea of the survival of the mind after death. Plus I've had my experiences through the years with the paranormal that cause me to believe that there is life beyond death. It's the one core belief that keeps me from fully … [Read more...]

Book Review: Relax, It’s Just God

NLQ friend and author of "13:24  - A Story of Faith and Obsession" M. Dolon Hickmon has written a review of Patheos blogger Wendy Thomas Russell's new book "Relax, It's Just God" for The Humanist.Com. Wendy blogs about parenting at Natural Wonderers.This is a book that deals with the issues of how and when to explain or expose your children to the ideas of faith, even if you have no religious beliefs of your own as a parent. It cites research data from a large group of secular parents positing when and what to teach your children, or if you should bother teaching your children any knowledge of faith or belief. … [Read more...]

“Zimzum of Love” review 97 – 121, “Sacred” & “Epilogue”

by Samantha Field cross posted from her blog Defeating The Dragons This is the last post on the book, and I find myself wondering if I can enthusiastically endorse it. It’s certainly different than every other Christian marriage-advice book I’ve ever read, and I’ve deeply appreciated those differences. It’s straightforward, honest, authentic, all things I appreciate, but at times it got a little boring because they frequently dipped into pretty conservative Christian ideas about the role and purpose of marriage, and I think they skirted more difficult questions or avoided them entirely. They didn’t examine problems like we’re just not happy anymore, or we want completely different things in … [Read more...]


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